Deploy a Lightweight Autonomous Identity

Autonomous Identity supports a flexible and scalable microservices architecture that you can deploy in any type of network environment: on-prem, cloud, multi-cloud, or hybrid cloud.

The deployment process is simple. Autonomous Identity provides a deployer script that you launch on a local server or laptop. The deployer pulls down the necessary images from the ForgeRock Google Cloud Repository (gcr.io) to install Autonomous Identity on the target node. From there, you run a few commands to complete the installation.

To download the deployer, you must obtain a registry key to access the ForgeRock Google Cloud Repository. Only ForgeRock Autonomous Identity customers can obtain a registry key. For more information, contact ForgeRock.

For this example, we install a lightweight version of Autonomous Identity in a two-core 8GB virtual machine on a cloud platform, such as Google Cloud Platform (GCP), Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, or others. The deployment includes the Docker-based microservices component and Apache Cassandra, but not Apache Spark. From there, you populate demo data by importing it into Cassandra and then display it on the Autonomous Identity UI console. This setup provides a way to deploy a system quickly for demonstration purposes.

This installation assumes that you set up the deployer script on a separate machine from the target. This lets you launch a build from a laptop or local server.

A simple diagram is shown below:

Figure 1: A lightweight single-node target deployment.

Autonomous Identity deployed in a lightweight, single-node target deployment.

This example setup is only for development or evaluation purposes and should not be used for production deployments.

Let’s set up Autonomous Identity on CentOS 7. The following are some prerequisites:

Prerequisites

  • Operating System. The target machine requires CentOS 7 and Python 3.6 or later. The deployer machine can use any operating system as long as Docker is installed. For this guide, we use CentOS 7 as its base operating system.

  • Memory Requirements. Make sure you have enough free disk space on the deployer machine before running the deployer.sh commands. We recommend at least a 40GB/partition with 14GB used and 27GB free after running the commands.

  • Registry Requirements. Autonomous Identity provides a Docker image that creates a deployer.sh script. The script downloads additional images necessary for the installation. To download the deployment images, you must first obtain a registry key to log into the ForgeRock Google Cloud Registry (gcr.io). The registry key is only available to ForgeRock Autonomous Identity customers. For specific instructions on obtaining the registry key, see How To Configure Service Credentials (Push Auth, Docker) in Backstage.

Set Up the Target Machine

  1. The install assumes that you have CentOS 7 as your operating system. Check your CentOS 7 version.

    $ sudo cat /etc/centos-release
  2. Check your Python version. Autonomous Identity supports Python 3.6 and higher.

    $ python --version
  3. Set the user for the target machine to a username of your choice. For example, autoid.

    # sudo adduser autoid
  4. Set the password for the user you created in the previous step.

    $ sudo passwd autoid
  5. Configure the user for passwordless sudo.

    $ echo "autoid    ALL=(ALL)  NOPASSWD:ALL" | sudo tee /etc/sudoers.d/autoid
  6. Add administrator privileges to the user.

    $ sudo usermod -aG wheel autoid
  7. Change to the user account.

    $ su - autoid
  8. Install yum-utils package on the deployer machine. yum-utils is a utilities manager for the Yum RPM package repository. The repository compresses software packages for Linux distributions.

    $ sudo yum -y install yum-utils

Set Up the Deployer Machine

Set up another machine as a deployer node. You can use any OS-based machine for the deployer as long as it has Docker installed. For this example, we use CentOS 7.

  1. The install assumes that you have CentOS 7 as your operating system. Check your CentOS 7 version.

    $ sudo cat /etc/centos-release
  2. Check your Python version. Autonomous Identity supports Python 3.6 and higher.

    $ python --version
  3. Set the user for the target machine to a username of your choice. For example, autoid.

    # sudo adduser autoid
  4. Set the user password for the user you created in the previous step.

    $ sudo passwd autoid
  5. Configure the user for passwordless sudo. Replace "autoid" with the username for your system.

    $ echo "autoid    ALL=(ALL)  NOPASSWD:ALL" | sudo tee /etc/sudoers.d/autoid
  6. Add administrator privileges to the user.

    $ sudo usermod -aG wheel autoid
  7. Change to the user account.

    $ su - autoid
  8. Install yum-utils package on the deployer machine. yum-utils is a utilities manager for the Yum RPM package repository. The repository compresses software packages for Linux distributions.

    $ sudo yum -y install yum-utils
  9. Create the installation directory. Note that you can use any install directory for your system as long as your run the deployer.sh script from there. Also, the disk volume where you have the install directory must have at least 8GB free space for the installation.

    $ mkdir ~/autoid-config

Install Docker on the Deployer Machine

Install Docker on the deployer machine. We run commands from this machine to install Autonomous Identity on the target machine. In this example, we use CentOS 7.

  1. On the target machine, set up the Docker-CE repository.

    $ sudo yum-config-manager \
         --add-repo https://download.docker.com/linux/centos/docker-ce.repo
  2. Install the latest version of the Docker CE, the command-line interface, and containerd.io, a containerized website.

    $ sudo yum -y install  docker-ce docker-ce-cli containerd.io
  3. Enable Docker to start at boot.

    $ sudo systemctl enable docker
  4. Start Docker.

    $ sudo systemctl start docker
  5. Check that Docker is running.

    $ systemctl status docker
  6. Add the user to the Docker group.

    $ sudo usermod -aG docker ${USER}
  7. Reset the privileges on the Docker socket.

    $ sudo chmod 666 /var/run/docker.sock

Set Up SSH on the Deployer

  1. On the deployer machine, change to the SSH directory.

    $ cd ~/.ssh
  2. Run ssh-keygen to generate an RSA keypair, and then click Enter. You can use the default filename. Enter a password for protecting your private key.

    $ ssh-keygen -t rsa -C "autoid"

    The public and private rsa key pair is stored in home-directory/.ssh/id_rsa and home-directory/.ssh/id_rsa.pub .

  3. Copy the SSH key to the autoid-config directory.

    $ cp id_rsa ~/autoid-config
  4. Change the privileges and owner to the file.

    $ chmod 400 ~/autoid-config/id_rsa
  5. Copy your public SSH key, id_rsa.pub , to the target machine’s ~/.ssh/authorized_keys file.

    If your target system does not have an /authorized_keys directory, create it using mkdir -p ~/.ssh/authorized_keys.
    $ ssh-copy-id -i id_rsa.pub autoid@34.70.190.144
  6. On the deployer machine, test your SSH connection to the target machine. This is a critical step. Make sure the connection works before proceeding with the installation.

    $ ssh -i ~/.ssh/id_rsa autoid@34.70.190.144
    
    Last login: Wed Sep 23 14:06:06 2020
  7. On the target machine, set the privileges on your ~/.ssh and ~/.ssh/authorized_keys .

    $ chmod 700 ~/.ssh && chmod 600 ~/.ssh/authorized_keys
  8. If you successfully accessed the remote server and changed the privileges on the ~/.ssh , enter exit to end your SSH session.

Install Autonomous Identity

  1. On the deployer machine, change to the installation directory.

    $ cd ~/autoid-config/
  2. Log in to the ForgeRock Google Cloud Registry (gcr.io) using the registry key. The registry key is only available to ForgeRock Autonomous Identity customers. For specific instructions on obtaining the registry key, see How To Configure Service Credentials (Push Auth, Docker) in Backstage.

    $ docker login -u _json_key -p "$(cat autoid_registry_key.json)" https://gcr.io/forgerock-autoid
  3. Run the create-template command to generate the deployer.sh wrapper. Note that the command sets the configuration directory on the target node to /config . The --user parameter eliminates the need to use sudo while editing the hosts file and other configuration files.

    $ docker run --user=id -u -v ~/autoid-config:/config -it gcr.io/forgerock-autoid/deployer:2021.3.0 create-template
  4. Make the script executable.

    $ chmod +x deployer.sh
  5. To see the list of commands, enter deployer.sh .

    $ ./deployer.sh
    
    Usage: deployer <command>
    
    Commands:
      create-template
      download-images
      import-deployer
      encrypt-vault
      decrypt-vault
      run
      create-tar
      install-docker
      install-dbutils
      upgrade

Configure Autonomous Identity

The create-template command from the previous section creates a number of configuration files, required for the deployment.

  1. The create-template command creates a number of configuration files, including ansible.cfg . Open a text editor and edit the ansible.cfg to set up the remote user and SSH private key file location on the target node. Make sure that the remote_user exists on the target node.

    [defaults]
    host_key_checking = False
    remote_user = autoid
    private_key_file = id_rsa
    #set-ansible-cfg
  2. On the deployer machine, open a text editor and edit the ~/autoid-config/vars.yml file to configure specific settings for your deployment:

    • Database Type. By default, Apache Cassandra is set as the default database for Autonomous Identity. For this example, accept the default: Apache Cassandra. For instructions on configuring MongoDB, see Install a Single Node Deployment.

      db_driver_type: cassandra

    • Private IP Address Mapping. If your external and internal IP addresses are different, for example, when deploying the target host in a cloud, define a mapping between the external IP address and the private IP address in the ~/autoid-config/vars.yml file.

      If your external and internal IP addresses are the same, you can skip this step.

      On the deployer node, add the private_ip_address_mapping property in the ~/autoid-config/vars.yml file. You can look up the private IP on the cloud console, or run sudo ifconfig on the target host. Make sure the values are within double quotes. The key should not be in double quotes and should have two spaces preceding the IP address.

      private_ip_address_mapping:
        external_ip:  "internal_ip"

      For example:

      private_ip_address_mapping:
        34.70.190.144:  "10.128.0.52"
  3. Open a text editor and enter the target host’s public IP addresses in the ~/autoid-config/hosts file. Make sure the target machine’s external IP address is accessible from the deployer machine.

    [docker-managers]
    34.70.190.144
    
    [docker-workers]
    34.70.190.144
    
    [docker:children]
    docker-managers
    docker-workers
    
    [cassandra-seeds]
    34.70.190.144
    
    [cassandra-workers]
    34.70.190.144
    
    [spark-master]
    
    [spark-workers]
    
    [analytics]
    
    [mongo_master]
    
    [mongo_replicas]
    
    [mongo:children]
    mongo_replicas
    mongo_master
    
    # ELastic Nodes
    [odfe-master-node]
    34.70.190.144
    
    [odfe-data-nodes]
    
    [kibana-node]
    34.70.190.144
  4. Open a text editor to see the Autonomous Identity passwords, located at ~/autoid-config/vault.yml .

    configuration_service_vault:
        basic_auth_password: Welcome123
    
      openldap_vault:
        openldap_password: Welcome123
    
      cassandra_vault:
        cassandra_password: Welcome123
        cassandra_admin_password: Welcome123
    
      mongo_vault:
        mongo_admin_password: Welcome123
        mongo_root_password: Welcome123
    
      elastic_vault:
        elastic_admin_password: Welcome123
        elasticsearch_password: Welcome123
  5. Encrypt the vault file that stores the Autonomous Identity passwords, located at ~/autoid-config/vault.yml. Make note of the vault password. You will be asked to enter it when running the encrypt-vault command.

    $ ./deployer.sh encrypt-vault

    The encrypted passwords are saved to /config/.autoid_vault_password.

  6. The /config/ mount is internal to the deployer container.

  7. Download the images. This step downloads software dependencies needed for the deployment.

    $ ./deployer.sh download-images
  8. Run the deployer. This step builds the Docker microservices and Cassandra service.

    $ ./deployer.sh run
  9. Run the install-dbutils command. This command creates a dbutils directory in the target instance’s Cassandra seed node.

    $ ./deployer.sh install-dbutils

Import the Demo Data

If you are setting up a fresh install using the demo data provided by ForgeRock, follow these steps. Note that these steps were run on Google Cloud Platform CentOS 7 instances.

  1. Contact ForgeRock to obtain the demo data. Download the 2021.3.0 zip file to your machine.

  2. Copy the csv folder from the extracted data to a folder on the target machine.

    $ sudo scp 2021.3.0.zip autoid@34.70.190.144:/home/autoid/
  3. From the deployer node, SSH to the target node.

  4. From the /home/autoid/ directory, extract the download zip.

    $ unzip 2021.3.0.zip
  5. Change to the dbutils directory.

    $ cd /opt/autoid/dbutils
  6. Use the dbutils.py import command to populate the Autonomous Identity keyspace with the demo data.

    $ python dbutils.py import /import-dir

    For example:

    $ python dbutils.py import ~/2021.3.0/csv/data
  7. Change to the demo directory.

    $ cd ~/2021.3.0
  8. Extract the assignment-index-backup.tar.gz file. You should see an elastic-backup folder.

    $ tar -xf assignments-index-backup.tar.gz
  9. Copy the contents of the elastic-backup folder to /opt/autoid/elastic/elastic-backup .

    $ cp -r elastic-backup/* /opt/autoid/elastic/elastic-backup
  10. Change to the /opt/autoid/elastic directory.

    $ cd /opt/autoid/elastic
  11. Run the ./assignment-index-restore.sh script. When prompted for a snapshot name, press Enter to accept the default.

    $ ./assignment-index-restore.sh
    
    Elastic Host: 10.128.0.52
    Elastic Server Status : 200
    Elastic server is up and running …​
    assignment index exists status : 404
    entitlement-assignment not found…​ Proceeding with restore…​
    Restore snapshot ? true
     registerSnapshotStatus 200
    registering assignment_index_backup successful…​
    proceeding with index restore…​
    Enter the snapshot name to restore [snapshot_01]:
    snapshot to restore -→ snapshot_01
    entitlement-assignment index restore status -→ 200
    * entitlement-assignment restore successful *

    You have successfully imported the data and the backend indices.

Hostname Resolution

  1. On the target machine, open a text editor and add an entry in the /etc/hosts file for the Autonomous Identity self-service and UI services.

    For example:

    34.70.190.144  autoid-ui.forgerock.com autoid-selfservice.forgerock.com

Check the System

  1. Open a browser, and point it to https://autoid-ui.forgerock.com/ .

  2. Log in as a test user: bob.rodgers@forgerock.com. Enter the password for the user Welcome123. You should see data populated on the Autonomous Identity UI console. Logout when done.