Identity Cloud

Scripting

Guide to scripting for ForgeRock® Identity Cloud.

Scripting lets you extend Identity Cloud functionality. For example, you can provide custom logic between source and target mappings, define correlation rules, filters, triggers, and so on. This guide shows you how to use scripts in Identity Cloud and provides reference information on the script engine.

Identity Cloud supports scripts written in JavaScript, and uses the following libraries:

  • Rhino version 1.7.13 to run JavaScript.

    Rhino has limited support for ES6 / ES2015 (JavaScript version 1.7). For more information, see Rhino ES2015 Support.
  • Lodash 3.10.1 and Handlebars 4.7.6 for Rhino scripting.

    Using Handlebars JS in server-side JS scripts requires synchronization; for example:

    var Handlebars = require("lib/handlebars");
    var result = new Packages.org.mozilla.javascript.Synchronizer(function() {
      var template = Handlebars.compile("Handlebars {{doesWhat}}");
      return template({ doesWhat: "rocks!" });
    }, Handlebars)();
    console.log(result);
  • BouncyCastle 1.67 for signing JWTs.

    The BouncyCastle .JAR file that is bundled with Identity Cloud includes the org.bouncycastle.asn1.util.Dump command-line utility. Although this utility is not used directly by Identity Cloud, it is possible to reference the utility in your scripts. Due to a security vulnerability in this utility, you should not reference it in your scripts. For more information, see the corresponding BouncyCastle issue.

ForgeRock Identity Platform™ serves as the basis for our simple and comprehensive Identity and Access Management solution. We help our customers deepen their relationships with their customers, and improve the productivity and connectivity of their employees and partners. For more information about ForgeRock and about the platform, see https://www.forgerock.com.

The ForgeRock Common REST API works across the platform to provide common ways to access web resources and collections of resources.

Call a script from the Identity Cloud configuration

To call a script from the Identity Cloud configuration, edit the configuration object. For example:

Provide a script source
{
    "type" : "text/javascript",
    "source": "scriptSource"
}

Script variables are not necessarily simple key:value pairs, and can be any arbitrarily complex JSON object.

type

string, required

The script type.

Identity Cloud supports "text/javascript".

source

string, required

Specifies the source code of the script to be executed.

In general, you should namespace variables passed into scripts with the globals map. Passing variables in this way prevents collisions with the top-level reserved words for script maps, such as source and type. This example uses the globals map to namespace the variables passed in the previous example.

"script": {
    "type" : "text/javascript",
    "source" : "scriptSource",
    "globals" : {
        "fromSender" : "admin@example.com",
        "toEmail" : "user@example.com"
    }
}

Examples

The following example script (in the mapping configuration) determines whether to include or ignore a target object in the reconciliation process based on an employeeType of true:

"validTarget" : {
    "type" : "text/javascript",
    "source" : "target.employeeType == 'external'"
}

The following example script (in the mapping configuration) sets the __PASSWORD__ attribute to defaultpwd when Identity Cloud creates a target object:

"onCreate" : {
    "type" : "text/javascript",
    "source" : "target.__PASSWORD__ = 'defaultpwd'"
}

You can pass variables to your scripts to provide contextual details at runtime. You pass variables to the scripts that are referenced in configuration by declaring the variable name in the script reference.

The following scheduled task configuration calls a script that triggers an email notification, but sets the sender and recipient of the email in the schedule configuration, rather than in the script itself:

{
    "enabled" : true,
    "type" : "cron",
    "schedule" : "0 0/1 * * * ?",
    "persisted" : true,
    "invokeService" : "script",
    "invokeContext" : {
        "script" : {
            "type" : "text/javascript",
            "source" : "scriptSource",
            "fromSender" : "admin@example.com",
            "toEmail" : "user@example.com"
        }
    }
}

Validate scripts over REST

Identity Cloud exposes a script endpoint over which scripts can be validated, by specifying the script parameters as part of the JSON payload. This functionality lets you test how a script will operate in your deployment, with complete control over the inputs and outputs. Testing scripts in this way can be useful in debugging.

The script endpoint supports two actions - eval and compile.

The eval action evaluates a script, by taking any actions referenced in the script, such as router calls to affect the state of an object. For JavaScript scripts, the last statement that is executed is the value produced by the script, and the expected result of the REST call.

The following REST call returns the value of an ESV (Environment Secret and Variable):

curl \
--header "Authorization: Bearer *token*" \
--header "Accept-API-Version: resource=1.0" \
--header "Content-Type: application/json" \
--request POST \
--data '{
  "type": "text/javascript",
  "source": "identityServer.getProperty(\"esv-myvariable_1\")"
}' \
"https://<tenant-env-fqdn>/openidm/script?_action=eval"

The variables passed into this script are namespaced with the globals map. It is preferable to namespace variables passed into scripts in this way, to avoid collisions with the top-level reserved words for script maps, such as file, source, and type.

The compile action compiles a script, but does not execute it. A successful compilation returns true. An unsuccessful compilation returns the reason for the failure.

The following REST call tests whether a transformation script will compile:

curl \
--header "Authorization: Bearer *token*" \
--header "Accept-API-Version: resource=1.0" \
--header "Content-Type: application/json" \
--request POST \
--data '{
  "type":"text/javascript",
  "source":"source.mail ? source.mail.toLowerCase() : null"
}' \
"http://<tenant-env-fqdn>/openidm/script?_action=compile"
True

If the script is not valid, the action returns an indication of the error, for example:

curl \
--header "Authorization: Bearer *token*" \
--header "Accept-API-Version: resource=1.0" \
--header "Content-Type: application/json" \
--request POST \
--data '{
  "type":"text/javascript",
  "source":"source.mail ? source.mail.toLowerCase()"
}' \
"http://<tenant-env-fqdn>/openidm/script?_action=compile"
{
  "code": 400,
  "reason": "Bad Request",
  "message": "missing : in conditional expression (386...BF2#1)in 386...BF2 at line number 1 at column number 39"
}

Create custom endpoints to launch scripts

Custom endpoints let you run arbitrary scripts through the REST API.

A custom endpoint configuration includes an inline script that provides the endpoint functionality.

Custom endpoint scripts

The following custom endpoint script demonstrates all the HTTP operations that can be called by a script. Each HTTP operation is associated with a method (create, read, update, delete, patch, action, or query). Requests sent to the custom endpoint return a list of the variables available to each method.

All scripts are invoked with a global request variable in their scope. This request structure carries all the information about the request.

Read requests on custom endpoints must not modify the state of the resource, either on the client or the server, as this can make them susceptible to CSRF exploits.

The standard READ endpoints are safe from Cross Site Request Forgery (CSRF) exploits because they are inherently read-only. That is consistent with the Guidelines for Implementation of REST, from the US National Security Agency, as "…​ CSRF protections need only be applied to endpoints that will modify information in some way."

Custom endpoint scripts must return a JSON object. The structure of the return object depends on the method in the request.

Depending on the method, the variables available to the script can include the following:

resourceName

The name of the resource, without the endpoint/ prefix, such as echo.

newResourceId

The identifier of the new object, available as the results of a create request.

revision

The revision of the object.

parameters

Any additional parameters provided in the request. The sample code returns request parameters from an HTTP GET with ?param=x, as "parameters":{"param":"x"}.

content

Content based on the latest revision of the object, using getObject.

context

The context of the request, including headers and security. For more information, see Request context chain.

Paging parameters

The pagedResultsCookie, pagedResultsOffset, and pageSize parameters are specific to query methods. For more information see Page Query Results.

Query parameters

The queryId and queryFilter parameters are specific to query methods. For more information see Construct Queries.

Sample custom endpoint script

(function(){
    if (request.method === "create") {
        return {
            method: "create",
            resourceName: request.resourcePath,
            newResourceId: request.newResourceId,
            parameters: request.additionalParameters,
            content: request.content,
            context: context.current
        };
    } else if (request.method === "read") {
        return {
            method: "read",
            resourceName: request.resourcePath,
            parameters: request.additionalParameters,
            context: context.current
        };
    } else if (request.method === "update") {
        return {
            method: "update",
            resourceName: request.resourcePath,
            revision: request.revision,
            parameters: request.additionalParameters,
            content: request.content,
            context: context.current
        };
    } else if (request.method === "patch") {
        return {
            method: "patch",
            resourceName: request.resourcePath,
            revision: request.revision,
            parameters: request.additionalParameters,
            patch: request.patchOperations,
            context: context.current
        };
    } else if (request.method === "query") {
        // query results must be returned as a list of maps
        return [ {
            method: "query",
            resourceName: request.resourcePath,
            pagedResultsCookie: request.pagedResultsCookie,
            pagedResultsOffset: request.pagedResultsOffset,
            pageSize: request.pageSize,
            queryId: request.queryId,
            queryFilter: request.queryFilter.toString(),
            parameters: request.additionalParameters,
            content: request.content,
            context: context.current
        } ];
    } else if (request.method === "delete") {
        return {
            method: "delete",
            resourceName: request.resourcePath,
            revision: request.revision,
            parameters: request.additionalParameters,
            context: context.current
        };
    } else if (request.method === "action") {
        return {
            method: "action",
            action: request.action,
            content: request.content,
            parameters: request.additionalParameters,
            context: context.current
        };
    } else {
        throw { code : 500, message : "Unknown request type " + request.method };
    }
})();

Custom endpoint configuration

A custom endpoint configuration has the following structure:

{
    "context" : "context path",
    "type" : "script language",
    "source" : "script source"
}
context

string, optional

The root URL path for the endpoint, in other words, the route to the endpoint. An endpoint with the context endpoint/test is addressable over REST at the URL http://<tenant-env-fqdn>/openidm/endpoint/test or by using a script such as openidm.read("endpoint/test").

Endpoint contexts support wild cards, as shown in the preceding example. The endpoint/linkedview/* route matches the following patterns:

endpoint/linkedView/managed/realm-name_user/bjensen
endpoint/linkedView/system/ldap/account/bjensen
endpoint/linkedView/
endpoint/linkedView
type

string, required

The script type.

Identity Cloud supports "text/javascript".

source

The inline script source.

For example:

"source" : "require('linkedView').fetch(request.resourcePath);"

Sample custom endpoint configuration

{
    "type" : "text/javascript",
    "source" : "<script>"
}

Script exceptions

Some custom endpoint scripts require exception-handling logic. To return meaningful messages in REST responses and in logs, you must comply with the language-specific method of throwing errors.

A script written in JavaScript should comply with the following exception format:

throw {
    "code": 400, // any valid HTTP error code
    "message": "custom error message",
    "detail" : {
        "var": parameter1,
        "complexDetailObject" : [
            "detail1",
            "detail2"
        ]
    }
}

Any exceptions will include the specified HTTP error code, the corresponding HTTP error message, such as Bad Request, a custom error message that can help you diagnose the error, and any additional detail that you think might be helpful.

Register custom scripted actions

You can register custom scripts that initiate some arbitrary action on a managed object endpoint. You can declare any number of actions in your managed object schema and associate those actions with a script.

The return value of a custom scripted action is ignored. The managed object is returned as the response of the scripted action, whether that object has been updated by the script or not.

Custom scripted actions have access to the following variables:

  • context

  • request

  • resourcePath

  • object

Example scenario

In this scenario, you want your managed users to have the option to receive update notifications. You can define an action that toggles the value of a specific property on the user object.

  1. Add an updates property to the managed object configuration:

    "properties": {
        ...
        "updates": {
            "title": "Automatic Updates",
            "viewable": true,
            "type": "boolean",
            "searchable": true,
            "userEditable": true
        },
        ...
    }
  2. Add a toggleUpdates action to the managed user object definition:

    {
        "objects" : [
            {
                "name" : "user",
                "onCreate" : {
                    ...
                },
                ...
                "actions" : {
                    "toggleUpdates" : {
                        "type" : "text/javascript",
                        "source" : "openidm.patch(resourcePath, null, [{ 'operation' : 'replace', 'field' : '/updates', 'value' : !object.updates }])"
                    }
                },
                ...
            }
        ]
    }
    The toggleUpdates action calls a script that changes the value of the user’s updates property.
  3. To call the script, specify the ID of the action in a POST request on the user object:

    curl \
    --header "Authorization: Bearer *token*" \
    --header "Accept-API-Version: resource=1.0" \
    --request POST \
    "http://<tenant-env-fqdn>/openidm/managed/realm-name_user/ID?_action=toggleUpdates"

    You can now test the functionality.

  4. Create a managed user, bjensen, with an updates property set to true:

    curl \
    --header "Authorization: Bearer *token*" \
    --header "Accept-API-Version: resource=1.0" \
    --header "Content-Type: application/json" \
    --request POST \
    --data '{
      "userName":"bjensen",
      "sn":"Jensen",
      "givenName":"Barbara",
      "mail":"bjensen@example.com",
      "telephoneNumber":"5556787",
      "description":"Created by OpenIDM REST.",
      "updates": true,
      "password":"Passw0rd"
    }' \
    "http://<tenant-env-fqdn>/openidm/managed/realm-name_user?_action=create"
    {
      "_id": "9dce06d4-2fc1-4830-a92b-bd35c2f6bcbb",
      "_rev": "0000000050c62938",
      "userName": "bjensen",
      "sn": "Jensen",
      "givenName": "Barbara",
      "mail": "bjensen@example.com",
      "telephoneNumber": "5556787",
      "description": "Created by OpenIDM REST.",
      "updates": true,
      "accountStatus": "active",
      "effectiveRoles": [],
      "effectiveAssignments": []
    }
  5. Run the toggleUpdates action on bjensen:

    curl \
    --header "Authorization: Bearer *token*" \
    --header "Accept-API-Version: resource=1.0" \
    --request POST \
    "http://<tenant-env-fqdn>/openidm/managed/realm-name_user/9dce06d4-2fc1-4830-a92b-bd35c2f6bcbb?_action=toggleUpdates"
    {
      "_id": "9dce06d4-2fc1-4830-a92b-bd35c2f6bcbb",
      "_rev": "00000000a92657c7",
      "userName": "bjensen",
      "sn": "Jensen",
      "givenName": "Barbara",
      "mail": "bjensen@example.com",
      "telephoneNumber": "5556787",
      "description": "Created by OpenIDM REST.",
      "updates": false,
      "accountStatus": "active",
      "effectiveRoles": [],
      "effectiveAssignments": []
    }
    Note in the command output that this action has set bjensen’s updates property to false.

Request context chain

The context chain of any request is established as follows:

  1. The request starts with a root context, associated with a specific context ID.

  2. The root context is wrapped in the security context that includes the authentication and authorization detail for the request.

  3. The security context is further wrapped by the HTTP context, with the target URI. The HTTP context is associated with the normal parameters of the request, including a user agent, authorization token, and method.

  4. The HTTP context is wrapped by one or more server/router context(s), with an endpoint URI. The request can have several layers of server and router contexts.

Script triggers

Scripts can be triggered in different places, and by different events. The following list indicates the configuration files in which scripts can be referenced, the events upon which the scripts can be triggered, and the actual scripts that can be triggered on each of these files.

Scripts called in mappings
Triggered by situation

onCreate, onUpdate, onDelete, onLink, onUnlink

Object filter

validSource, validTarget

Triggered when correlating objects

correlationQuery, correlationScript

Triggered on any reconciliation

result

Scripts inside properties

condition, transform

sync.json supports only one script per hook. If multiple scripts are defined for the same hook, only the last one is kept.

Scripts inside policies

condition

Within a synchronization policy, you can use a condition script to apply different policies based on the link type, for example:

"condition" : {
  "type" : "text/javascript",
  "source" : "linkQualifier == \"user\""
}
Scripts called in the managed object configuration

onCreate, onRead, onUpdate, onDelete, onValidate, onRetrieve, onStore, onSync, postCreate, postUpdate, and postDelete

The managed object configuration supports only one script per hook. If multiple scripts are defined for the same hook, only the last one is kept.

Scripts called in the router configuration

onRequest, onResponse, onFailure

The router configuration supports multiple scripts per hook.

Script triggers defined in the managed object configuration

For information about how managed objects are handled, and the available script triggers, see Managed objects.

Managed object configuration object

Trigger Variable

onCreate, postCreate

  • object: The content of the object being created.

  • newObject: The object after the create operation is complete.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as client, end user, and routing.

  • resourceName: The resource path of the object of the query. For example, if you create a managed user with ID 42f8a60e-2019-4110-a10d-7231c3578e2b, resourceName returns managed/realm-name_user/42f8a60e-2019-4110-a10d-7231c3578e2b.

  • request: Information related to the request, such as headers, credentials, and the desired action. Also includes the endpoint, and payload to be processed.

onUpdate, postUpdate

Returns JSON object

  • object: The content of the object being updated.

  • oldObject: The state of the object, before the update.

  • newObject: Changes to be applied to the object. May continue with the onUpdate trigger.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as client, end user, and routing.

  • resourceName: The resource path of the object the query.

  • request: Information related to the request, such as headers, credentials, and the desired action. Also includes the endpoint, and payload to be processed.

onDelete, onRetrieve, onRead

Returns JSON object.

  • object: The content of the object.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as client, end user, and routing.

  • resourceName: The resource path of the object the query.

  • request: Information related to the request, such as headers, credentials, and the desired action. Also includes the endpoint, and payload to be processed.

postDelete

Returns JSON object.

  • oldObject: Represents the deleted object.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as client, end user, and routing.

  • resourceName: The resource path of the object the query is performed upon.

  • request: Information related to the request, such as headers, credentials, and the desired action. Also includes the endpoint, and payload to be processed.

onSync

Returns JSON object

  • oldObject: Represents the object prior to sync. If sync has not been run before, the value will be null.

  • newObject: Represents the object after sync is completed.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as client, end user, and routing.

  • request: Information related to the request, such as headers, credentials, and the desired action. Also includes the endpoint, and payload to be processed.

  • resourceName: An object representing the resource path the query is performed upon.

  • syncResults: A map containing the results and details of the sync, including:

    • success (boolean): Success or failure of the sync operation.

    • action: Returns the name of the action performed as a string.

    • syncDetails: The mappings attempted during synchronization.

onStore, onValidate

Returns JSON object

  • object: Represents the object being stored or validated.

  • value: The content to be stored or validated for the object.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as client, end user, and routing.

  • resourceName: The resource path of the object the query is performed upon.

  • request: Information related to the request, such as headers, credentials, and the desired action. Also includes the endpoint, and payload to be processed.

Property object

Trigger Variable

onRetrieve, onStore

Returns JSON object

  • object: Represents the object being operated upon.

  • property: The value of the property being retrieved or stored.

  • propertyName: The name of the property being retrieved or stored.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as client, end user, and routing.

  • resourceName: The resource path of the object the query is performed upon.

  • request: Information related to the request, such as headers, credentials, and the desired action. Also includes the endpoint, and payload to be processed.

onValidate

Returns JSON object

  • property: The value of the property being validated.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as client, end user, and routing.

  • resourceName: The resource path of the object the query is performed upon.

  • request: Information related to the request, such as headers, credentials, and the desired action. Also includes the endpoint, and payload to be processed.

Script triggers defined in mappings

For information about how managed objects in mappings are handled, and the script triggers available, see Object-Mapping Objects.

Object-mapping object

Trigger Variable

correlationQuery, correlationScript

Returns JSON object

  • source: Represents the source object.

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier associated with the current sync.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as source and target.

linkQualifiers

Returns JSON object

  • mapping: The name of the current mapping.

  • object: The value of the source object. During a DELETE event, that source object may not exist, and may be null.

  • oldValue: The former value of the deleted source object, if any. If the source object is new, oldValue will be null. When there are deleted objects, oldValue is populated only if the source is a managed object.

  • returnAll (boolean): Link qualifier scripts must return every valid link qualifier when returnAll is true, independent of the source object. If returnAll is true, the script must not attempt to use the object variable, because it will be null. It’s best practice to configure scripts to start with a check for the value of returnAll.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as source and target.

onCreate

Returns JSON object

  • source: Represents the source object.

  • target: Represents the target object.

  • situation: The situation associated with the current sync operation.

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier associated with the current sync operation.

  • context: Information related to the current sync operation.

  • sourceId: The object ID for the source object.

  • targetId: The object ID for the target object.

  • mappingConfig: A configuration object representing the mapping being processed.

onDelete, onUpdate

Returns JSON object

  • source: Represents the source object.

  • target: Represents the target object.

  • oldTarget: Represents the target object prior to the DELETE or UPDATE action.

  • situation: The situation associated with the current sync operation.

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier associated with the current sync.

  • context: Information related to the current sync operation.

  • sourceId: The object ID for the source object.

  • targetId: The object ID for the target object.

  • mappingConfig: A configuration object representing the mapping being processed.

onLink, onUnlink

Returns JSON object

  • source: Represents the source object.

  • target: Represents the target object.

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier associated with the current sync operation.

  • context: Information related to the current sync operation.

  • sourceId: The object ID for the source object.

  • targetId: The object ID for the target object.

  • mappingConfig: A configuration object representing the mapping being processed.

onError

Returns JSON object

  • source: Represents the source object.

  • target: Represents the target object.

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier associated with the current sync operation.

  • context: Information related to the current sync operation.

  • situation: The situation associated with the current sync operation.

  • sourceId: The object ID for the source object.

  • targetId: The object ID for the target object.

  • oldSource: Available during UPDATE and DELETE operations performed through implicit sync. With implicit synchronization, the synchronization operation is triggered by a specific change to the source object. As such, implicit sync can populate the old value within the oldSource variable and pass it on to the sync engine.

  • error: The result of the resource exception, as a JSON object.

  • mappingConfig: A configuration object representing the mapping being processed.

result

Returns JSON object of reconciliation results

  • source: Provides statistics about the source phase of the reconciliation.

  • target: Provides statistics about the target phase of the reconciliation.

  • context: Information related to the current operation, such as source and target.

  • global: Provides statistics about the entire reconciliation operation.

  • mappingConfig: A configuration object representing the mapping being processed.

  • reconState: Provides the state of reconciliation operation; such as, success, failure, or active.

validSource

Returns boolean

  • source: Represents the source object.

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier associated with the current sync operation.

  • context: Information related to the current sync operation.

validTarget

Returns boolean

  • target: Represents the target object.

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier associated with the current sync operation.

  • context: Information related to the current sync operation.

Property object

Trigger Variable

condition

Returns boolean

  • object: The current object being mapped.

  • context: Information related to the current operation, such as source and target.

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier associated with the current sync operation.

  • target: Represents the target object.

  • oldTarget: Represents the target object prior to any changes.

  • oldSource: Available during UPDATE and DELETE operations performed through implicit sync. With implicit synchronization, the synchronization operation is triggered by a specific change to the source object. As such, implicit sync can populate the old value within the oldSource variable and pass it on to the sync engine.

    During reconciliation operations oldSource will be undefined. A reconciliation operation cannot populate the value of the oldSource variable as it has no awareness of the specific change to the source object. Reconciliation simply synchronizes the static source object to the target.

transform

Returns JSON object

  • source: Represents the source object.

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier associated with the current sync operation.

  • context: Information related to the current sync operation.

Policy object

Trigger Variable

action

Returns string OR JSON object

  • source: Represents the source object.

  • target: Represents the target object.

  • sourceAction (boolean): Indicates whether the action is being processed during the source or target synchronization phase (true if performed during a source synchronization, false if performed during a target synchronization).

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier used for this operation (default if no other link qualifier is specified).

  • context: Information related to the current sync operation.

  • recon: Represents the reconciliation operation.

  • The recon.actionParam object contains information about the current reconciliation operation and includes the following variables:

    • reconId: The ID of the reconciliation operation.

    • mapping: The mapping for which the reconciliation was performed, for example, systemLdapAccounts_managedUser.

    • situation: The situation encountered, for example, AMBIGUOUS.

    • action: The default action that would be used for this situation, if not for this script. The script being executed replaces the default action (and is used instead of any other named action).

    • sourceId: The _id value of the source record.

    • linkQualifier: The link qualifier used for that mapping, (default if no other link qualifier is specified).

    • ambiguousTargetIds: An array of the target object IDs that were found in an AMBIGUOUS situation during correlation.

    • _action: The synchronization action (only performAction is supported).

postAction

Returns JSON object

  • source: Represents the source object.

  • target: Represents the target object.

  • action: The sync action that was performed.

  • sourceAction (boolean): Indicates whether the action is being processed during the source or target synchronization phase (true if performed during a source synchronization, false if performed during a target synchronization).

  • linkQualifier: The link qualifier used for this operation (default if no other link qualifier is specified).

  • reconId: Represents the ID of the reconciliation.

  • situation: Represents the situation for this policy.

  • context: Information related to the current operation, such as source and target.

Script triggers defined in the router configuration

Trigger Variable

onFailure

exception

onRequest

request

onResponse

response

The augmentSecurityContext trigger

The augmentSecurityContext trigger, defined in the authentication configuration, can reference a script that is executed after successful authentication. Such scripts can populate the security context of the authenticated user. If the authenticated user is not found in the resource specified by queryOnResource, the augmentSecurityContext can provide the required authorization map.

Such scripts have access to the following bindings:

  • security - includes the authenticationId and the authorization key, which includes the moduleId.

    The main purpose of an augmentSecurityContext script is to modify the authorization map that is part of this security binding. The authentication module determines the value of the authenticationId, and Identity Cloud attempts to populate the authorization map with the details that it finds, related to that authenticationId value. These details include the following:

    • security.authorization.component - the resource that contains the account (this will always will be the same as the value of queryOnResource by default).

    • security.authorization.id - the internal _id value that is associated with the account.

    • security.authorization.roles - any roles that were determined, either from reading the userRoles property of the account or from calculation.

    • security.authorization.moduleId - the authentication module responsible for performing the original authentication.

    You can use the augmentSecurityContext script to change any of these authorization values. The script can also add new values to the authorization map, which will be available for the lifetime of the session.

  • properties - corresponds to the properties map of the related authentication module.

  • httpRequest - a reference to the Request object that was responsible for handling the incoming HTTP request.

    This binding is useful to the augment script because it has access to all of the raw details from the HTTP request, such as the headers. The following code snippet shows how you can access a header using the httpRequest binding. This example accesses the authToken request header:

    httpRequest.getHeaders().getFirst('authToken').toString()

Script variables

The variables available to a script depend on several factors:

  • The trigger that launches the script.

  • The configuration file in which that trigger is defined.

  • The object type:

    • For objects defined in the managed object configuration, the object type is either a managed object, or a managed object property.

    • For objects defined in the mapping configuration, the object can be an object-mapping object, a property object, or a policy object. For more information, see Policy Objects).

The following subtopics list the variables available to scripts, based on the configuration file in which the trigger is defined.

Variables available to scripts in custom endpoints

All custom endpoint scripts have a request variable in their scope, which is a JSON object containing all information about the request. The parameters found in this object vary depending on the request method. The request may include headers, credentials, and the desired action. The request normally also includes the endpoint as well as the payload to be processed.

For more details about writing custom endpoint scripts, see Custom Endpoint Scripts.

Variable Variable Parameters

request

  • method: The type of request, such as query, create, or delete.

  • resourceName: The name of the resource associated with the request.

  • revision: The revision number of the requested object.

  • parameters: JSON object mapping any additional parameters sent in the request.

  • content: The contents of the requested object.

  • context: Information related to the current request, such as client, end user, and routing. Only available in query requests

  • pagedResultsCookie: Represents the cookie used for queryFilter operations to track the results of a filtered query.

  • pagedResultsOffset: Specifies how many records to skip before returning a set of results.

  • pageSize: Specifies how many results to return per page.

  • queryExpression: A string containing a native query to query a system resource directly.

  • queryId: A string using the id of a predefined query object to return a specific set of results from a queried object.

  • queryFilter: A string with a common expression used to filter the results of a queried object. Only available in create requests

  • newResourceId: The ID of the new object. Only available in create requests.

Variables available to role assignment scripts

The optional onAssignment and onUnassignment event scripts specify what should happen to attributes that are affected by role assignments when those assignments are applied to a user, or removed from a user.

These scripts have access to the following variables:

  • sourceObject

  • targetObject

  • existingTargetObject

  • linkQualifier

The standard assignment scripts, replaceTarget.js, mergeWithTarget.js, removeFromTarget.js, and noOp.js have access to all the variables in the previous list, as well as the following:

  • attributeName

  • attributeValue

  • attributesInfo

Role assignment scripts must always return targetObject, otherwise other scripts and code that occur downstream of your script will not work as expected.

The identityServer variable

Identity Cloud provides an additional variable, named identityServer, to scripts. You can use this variable in several ways. The ScriptRegistryService, described in Validate scripts over REST, binds this variable to:

  • getProperty

    Retrieves property information from system configuration files. Takes up to three parameters:

    • The name of the property you are requesting.

    • (Optional) The default result to return if the property wasn’t set.

    • (Optional) Boolean to determine whether to use property substitution when getting the property.

    For example, you can retrieve the value of the openidm.config.crypto.alias property with the following code:

    alias = identityServer.getProperty("openidm.config.crypto.alias", "true", true);

    The following REST call returns the value of an ESV (Environment Secret and Variable):

    curl \
    --header "Authorization: Bearer *token*" \
    --header "Accept-API-Version: resource=1.0" \
    --header "Content-Type: application/json" \
    --request POST \
    --data '{
      "type": "text/javascript",
      "source": "identityServer.getProperty(\"esv-myvariable_1\")"
    }' \
    "https://<tenant-env-fqdn>/openidm/script?_action=eval"
  • getInstallLocation

    Retrieves the Identity Cloud installation path, such as /path/to/openidm. May be superseded by an absolute path.

Router configuration

The router service provides the uniform interface to all Identity Cloud objects: managed objects, system objects, configuration objects, and so on.

The router configuration contains an array of Filter objects:

{
  "filters": [ filter object, ... ]
}

Filter objects

The required filters array defines a list of filters to be processed on each router request. Filters are processed in the order in which they are specified in this array, and have the following configuration:

{
  "pattern": string,
  "methods": [ string, ... ],
  "condition": script object,
  "onRequest": script object,
  "onResponse": script object,
  "onFailure": script object
}
pattern

string, optional

Specifies a regular expression pattern matching the JSON pointer of the object to trigger scripts. If not specified, all identifiers (including null) match. Pattern matching is done on the resource name, rather than on individual objects.

methods

array of strings, optional

One or more methods for which the script(s) should be triggered. Supported methods are: "create", "read", "update", "delete", "patch", "query", "action". If not specified, all methods are matched.

condition

script object, optional

Specifies a script that is called first to determine if the script should be triggered. If the condition yields "true", the other script(s) are executed. If no condition is specified, the script(s) are called unconditionally.

onRequest

script object, optional

Specifies a script to execute before the request is dispatched to the resource. If the script throws an exception, the method is not performed, and a client error response is provided.

onResponse

script object, optional

Specifies a script to execute after the request is successfully dispatched to the resource and a response is returned. Throwing an exception from this script does not undo the method already performed.

onFailure

script object, optional

Specifies a script to execute if the request resulted in an exception being thrown. Throwing an exception from this script does not undo the method already performed.

Pattern matching in the router configuration

Pattern matching can minimize overhead in the router service. The default router configuration includes instances of the pattern filter object, that limit script requests to specified methods and endpoints.

Based on the following code snippet, the router service would trigger the policyFilter.js script for CREATE and UPDATE calls to managed and internal objects:

{
    "pattern" : "^(managed|internal)($|(/.+))",
    "onRequest" : {
        "type" : "text/javascript",
        "source" : "require('policyFilter').runFilter()"
    },
    "methods" : [
        "create",
        "update"
    ]
}

Without this pattern, Identity Cloud would apply the policy filter to additional objects, such as the audit service, which could affect performance.

Script execution sequence

All onRequest and onResponse scripts are executed in sequence. First, the onRequest scripts are executed from the top down, then the onResponse scripts are executed from the bottom up.

client -> filter 1 onRequest -> filter 2 onRequest -> resource
client <- filter 1 onResponse <- filter 2 onResponse <- resource

The following sample router configuration shows the order in which the scripts would be executed:

{
    "filters" : [
        {
            "onRequest" : {
                "type" : "text/javascript",
                "source" : "require('router-authz').testAccess()"
            }
        },
        {
            "pattern" : "^managed/realm-name_user",
            "methods" : [
                "read"
            ],
            "onRequest" : {
                "type" : "text/javascript",
                "source" : "console.log('requestFilter 1');"
            }
        },
        {
            "pattern" : "^managed/realm-name_user",
            "methods" : [
                "read"
            ],
            "onResponse" : {
                "type" : "text/javascript",
                "source" : "console.log('responseFilter 1');"
            }
        },
        {
            "pattern" : "^managed/realm-name_user",
            "methods" : [
                "read"
            ],
            "onRequest" : {
                "type" : "text/javascript",
                "source" : "console.log('requestFilter 2');"
            }
        },
        {
            "pattern" : "^managed/realm-name_user",
            "methods" : [
                "read"
            ],
            "onResponse" : {
                "type" : "text/javascript",
                "source" : "console.log('responseFilter 2');"
            }
        }
    ]
}

This configuration would produce a log as follows:

requestFilter 1
requestFilter 2
responseFilter 2
responseFilter 1
Example Filter Configuration

This example executes a script after a managed user object is created or updated:

{
    "filters": [
        {
            "pattern": "^managed/realm-name_user",
            "methods": [
                "create",
                "update"
            ],
            "onResponse": {
                "type": "text/javascript",
                "file": "scripts/afterUpdateUser.js"
            }
        }
    ]
}

Script scope

Scripts are provided with the following scope:

{
  "openidm": openidm-functions object,
  "request": resource-request object,
  "response": resource-response object,
  "exception": exception object
}
openidm

openidm-functions object

Provides access to Identity Cloud resources.

request

resource-request object

The resource-request context, which has one or more parent contexts. Provided in the scope of all scripts. For more information about the request context, see Request context chain.

response

resource-response object

The response to the resource-request. Only provided in the scope of the "onResponse" script.

exception

exception object

The exception value that was thrown as a result of processing the request. Only provided in the scope of the "onFailure" script. An exception object is defined as:

{
  "code": integer,
  "reason": string,
  "message": string,
  "detail": string
}
code

integer

The numeric HTTP code of the exception.

reason

string

The short reason phrase of the exception.

message

string

A brief message describing the exception.

detail

(optional), string

A detailed description of the exception, in structured JSON format, suitable for programmatic evaluation.

1. Scripting function reference

If you need to request specific resource versions, see REST API versioning.

Functions (access to managed objects, system objects, and configuration objects) within Identity Cloud are accessible to scripts via the openidm object, which is included in the top-level scope provided to each script.

The script engine supports the following functions:

openidm.create(resourceName, newResourceId, content, params, fields)

This function creates a new resource object.

Parameters
resourceName

string

The container in which the object will be created, for example, managed/realm-name_user.

newResourceId

string

The identifier of the object to be created, if the client is supplying the ID. If the server should generate the ID, pass null here.

content

JSON object

The content of the object to be created.

params

JSON object (optional)

Additional parameters that are passed to the create request.

fields

JSON array (optional)

An array of the fields that should be returned in the result. The list of fields can include wild cards, such as * or *_ref. If no fields are specified, the entire new object is returned.

Returns

The created resource object.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the object could not be created.

Example
openidm.create("managed/realm-name_user", ID, JSON object);
openidm.patch(resourceName, rev, value, params, fields)

This function performs a partial modification of a managed or system object. Unlike the update function, only the modified attributes are provided, not the entire object.

Parameters
resourceName

string

The full path to the object being updated, including the ID.

rev

string

The revision of the object to be updated. Use null if the object is not subject to revision control, or if you want to skip the revision check and update the object, regardless of the revision.

value

An array of one or more JSON objects

The value of the modifications to be applied to the object. The patch set includes the operation type, the field to be changed, and the new values. A PATCH request can add, remove, replace, or increment an attribute value.

A remove operation removes a property if the value of that property equals the specified value, or if no value is specified in the request. The following example value removes the marital_status property from the object, if the value of that property is single:

[
    {
        "operation": "remove",
        "field": "marital_status",
        "value": "single"
    }
]

For fields whose value is an array, it’s not necessary to know the position of the value in the array, as long as you specify the full object. If the full object is found in the array, that value is removed. The following example removes user adonnelly from bjensen’s reports:

{
    "operation": "remove",
    "field": "/manager",
    "value": {
      "_ref": "managed/realm-name_user/adonnelly",
      "_refResourceCollection": "managed/realm-name_user",
      "_refResourceId": "adonnelly",
      "_refProperties": {
        "_id": "ed6620e4-98ba-410c-abc0-e06dc1be7aa7",
        "_rev": "000000008815942b"
      }
    }
}

If an invalid value is specified (that is a value that does not exist for that property in the current object) the patch request is silently ignored.

A replace operation replaces an existing value, or adds a value if no value exists.

params

JSON object (optional)

Additional parameters that are passed to the patch request.

fields

JSON array (optional)

An array of the fields that should be returned in the result. The list of fields can include wild cards, such as * or *_ref. If no fields are specified, the entire new object is returned.

Returns

The modified resource object.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the object could not be updated.

Examples

Patching an object to add a value to an array:

openidm.patch("managed/realm-name_role/" + role._id, null, [{"operation":"add", "field":"/members/-", "value": {"_ref":"managed/realm-name_user/" + user._id}}]);

Patching an object to remove an existing property:

openidm.patch("managed/realm-name_user/" + user._id, null, [{"operation":"remove", "field":"marital_status", "value":"single"}]);

Patching an object to replace a field value:

openidm.patch("managed/realm-name_user/" + user._id, null, [{"operation":"replace", "field":"/password", "value":"Passw0rd"}]);

Patching an object to increment an integer value:

openidm.patch("managed/realm-name_user/" + user._id, null, [{"operation":"increment","field":"/age","value":1}]);
openidm.read(resourceName, params, fields)

This function reads and returns a resource object.

Parameters
resourceName

string

The full path to the object to be read, including the ID.

params

JSON object (optional)

The parameters that are passed to the read request. Generally, no additional parameters are passed to a read request, but this might differ, depending on the request. If you need to specify a list of fields as a third parameter, and you have no additional params to pass, you must pass null here. Otherwise, you simply omit both parameters.

fields

JSON array (optional)

An array of the fields that should be returned in the result. The list of fields can include wild cards, such as * or *_ref. If no fields are specified, the entire object is returned.

Returns

The resource object, or null if not found.

Example
openidm.read("managed/realm-name_user/"+userId, null, ["*", "manager"]);
openidm.update(resourceName, rev, value, params, fields)

This function updates an entire resource object.

Parameters
id

string

The complete path to the object to be updated, including its ID.

rev

string

The revision of the object to be updated. Use null if the object is not subject to revision control, or if you want to skip the revision check and update the object, regardless of the revision.

value

object

The complete replacement object.

params

JSON object (optional)

The parameters that are passed to the update request.

fields

JSON array (optional)

An array of the fields that should be returned in the result. The list of fields can include wild cards, such as * or *_ref. If no fields are specified, the entire object is returned.

Returns

The modified resource object.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the object could not be updated.

Example

In this example, the managed user entry is read (with an openidm.read, the user entry that has been read is updated with a new description, and the entire updated object is replaced with the new value.

var user_read = openidm.read('managed/realm-name_user/' + source._id);
user_read['description'] = 'The entry has been updated';
openidm.update('managed/realm-name_user/' + source._id, null, user_read);
openidm.delete(resourceName, rev, params, fields)

This function deletes a resource object.

Parameters
resourceName

string

The complete path to the to be deleted, including its ID.

rev

string

The revision of the object to be deleted. Use null if the object is not subject to revision control, or if you want to skip the revision check and delete the object, regardless of the revision.

params

JSON object (optional)

The parameters that are passed to the delete request.

fields

JSON array (optional)

An array of the fields that should be returned in the result. The list of fields can include wild cards, such as * or *_ref. If no fields are specified, the entire object is returned.

Returns

Returns the deleted object if successful.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the object could not be deleted.

Example
openidm.delete('managed/realm-name_user/'+ user._id, user._rev);
openidm.query(resourceName, params, fields)

This function performs a query on the specified resource object. For more information, see Construct Queries.

Parameters
resourceName

string

The resource object on which the query should be performed, for example, "managed/realm-name_user", or "system/ldap/account".

params

JSON object

The parameters that are passed to the query (_queryFilter, or _queryId). Additional parameters passed to the query will differ, depending on the query.

Certain common parameters can be passed to the query to restrict the query results. The following sample query passes paging parameters and sort keys to the query.

reconAudit = openidm.query("audit/recon", {
    "_queryFilter": queryFilter,
    "_pageSize": limit,
    "_pagedResultsOffset": offset,
    "_pagedResultsCookie": string,
    "_sortKeys": "-timestamp"
});

For more information about _queryFilter syntax, see Common Filter Expressions. For more information about paging, see Page Query Results.

fields

list

A list of the fields that should be returned in the result. The list of fields can include wild cards, such as * or *_ref. The following example returns only the userName and _id fields:

openidm.query("managed/realm-name_user", { "_queryFilter": "/userName sw \"user.1\""}, ["userName", "_id"]);

This parameter is particularly useful in enabling you to return the response from a query without including intermediary code to massage it into the right format.

Fields are specified as JSON pointers.

Returns

The result of the query. A query result includes the following parameters:

query-time-ms

(For JDBC repositories only) the time, in milliseconds, that Identity Cloud took to process the query.

result

The list of entries retrieved by the query. The result includes the properties that were requested in the query.

The following example shows the result of a custom query that requests the ID, user name, and email address of all managed users in the repository.

{
  "result": [
    {
      "_id": "9dce06d4-2fc1-4830-a92b-bd35c2f6bcbb",
      "_rev": "00000000a059dc9f",
      "userName": "bjensen",
      "mail": "bjensen@example.com"
    },
    {
      "_id": "42f8a60e-2019-4110-a10d-7231c3578e2b",
      "_rev": "00000000d84ade1c",
      "userName": "scarter",
      "mail": "scarter@example.com"
    }
  ],
  "resultCount": 2,
  "pagedResultsCookie": null,
  "totalPagedResultsPolicy": "NONE",
  "totalPagedResults": -1,
  "remainingPagedResults": -1
}
Throws

An exception is thrown if the given query could not be processed.

Examples

The following sample query uses a _queryFilter to query the managed user repository:

openidm.query("managed/realm-name_user", {'_queryFilter': userIdPropertyName + ' eq "' + security.authenticationId  + '"'});

The following sample query references the for-userName query, defined in the repository configuration, to query the managed user repository:

openidm.query("managed/realm-name_user", {"_queryId": "for-userName", "uid": request.additionalParameters.uid });
openidm.action(resource, actionName, content, params, fields)

This function performs an action on the specified resource object. The resource and actionName are required. All other parameters are optional.

Parameters
resource

string

The resource that the function acts upon, for example, managed/realm-name_user.

actionName

string

The action to execute. Actions are used to represent functionality that is not covered by the standard methods for a resource (create, read, update, delete, patch, or query). In general, you should not use the openidm.action function for create, read, update, patch, delete or query operations. Instead, use the corresponding function specific to the operation (for example, openidm.create).

Using the operation-specific functions lets you benefit from the well-defined REST API, which follows the same pattern as all other standard resources in the system. Using the REST API enhances usability for your own API, and enforces the established patterns.

Identity Cloud-defined resources support a fixed set of actions. For user-defined resources (scriptable endpoints) you can implement whatever actions you require.

Supported Actions Per Resource

The following list outlines the supported actions for each resource or endpoint. The actions listed here are also supported over the REST interface.

Actions supported on the authentication endpoint (authentication/*)

reauthenticate

Actions supported on the configuration resource (config/)

No action parameter applies.

Actions supported on custom endpoints

Custom endpoints enable you to run arbitrary scripts through the REST URI, and are routed at endpoint/name, where name generally describes the purpose of the endpoint. For more information on custom endpoints, see Create custom endpoints to launch scripts. You can implement whatever actions you require on a custom endpoint. Identity Cloud uses custom endpoints in its workflow implementation. Those endpoints, and their actions are as follows:

endpoint/getprocessforuser - create, complete
endpoint/gettasksview - create, complete

Actions supported on the external endpoint
  • external/email - send, for example:

    {
        emailParams = {
            "from" : 'admin@example.com',
            "to" : user.mail,
            "subject" : 'Password expiry notification',
            "type" : 'text/plain',
            "body" : 'Your password will expire soon. Please change it!'
        }
        openidm.action("external/email", "send",  emailParams);
    }
  • external/email - sendTemplate, for example:

    {
        emailParams = {
            "templateName" : "welcome",
            "to" : user.mail,
            "cc" : "ccUser1@example.com,ccUser2@example.com",
            "bcc" : "bigBoss@example.com"
        }
        openidm.action("external/email", "sendTemplate",  emailParams);
    }
  • external/rest - call, for example:

    openidm.action("external/rest", "call", params);
Actions supported on the info endpoint (info/*)

No action parameter applies.

Actions supported on managed resources (managed/*)

patch, triggerSyncCheck

Actions supported on the policy resource (policy)

validateObject, validateProperty

For example:

openidm.action("policy/" + fullResourcePath, "validateObject", request.content, { "external" : "true" });
Actions supported on the reconciliation resource (recon)

recon, reconById, cancel

For example:

openidm.action("recon", "cancel", content, params);
Actions supported on the repository (repo)

command

For example:

var r, command = {
    "commandId": "purge-by-recon-number-of",
    "numberOf": numOfRecons,
    "includeMapping": includeMapping,
    "excludeMapping": excludeMapping
};
r = openidm.action("repo/audit/recon", "command", {}, command);
Actions supported on the script resource (script)

eval

For example:

openidm.action("script", "eval", getConfig(scriptConfig), {});
Actions supported on the synchronization resource (sync)

getLinkedResources, notifyCreate, notifyDelete, notifyUpdate, performAction

For example:

openidm.action('sync', 'performAction', content, params);
Actions supported on system resources (system/*)

availableConnectors, createCoreConfig, createFullConfig, test, testConfig, liveSync, authenticate, script

For example:

openidm.action("system/ldap/account", "authenticate", {"username" : "bjensen", "password" : "Passw0rd"});
Actions supported on the task scanner resource (taskscanner)

execute, cancel

Actions supported on the workflow resource (workflow/*)

On workflow/processdefinition create, complete

On workflow/processinstance create, complete

For example:

var params = {
    "_key":"contractorOnboarding"
};
openidm.action('workflow/processinstance', 'create', params);

On workflow/taskinstance claim, create, complete

For example:

var params = {
    "userId":"manager1"
};
openidm.action('workflow/taskinstance/15', 'claim', params);
content

object

Content given to the action for processing.

params

object (optional)

Additional parameters passed to the script. The params object must be a set of simple key:value pairs, and cannot include complex values. The parameters must map directly to URL variables, which take the form name1=val1&name2=val2&…​.

fields

JSON array (optional)

An array of the fields that should be returned in the result. The list of fields can include wild cards, such as * or *_ref. If no fields are specified, the entire object is returned.

Returns

The result of the action may be null.

Throws

If the action cannot be executed, an exception is thrown.

openidm.encrypt(value, cipher, alias)

This function encrypts a value.

Parameters
value

any

The value to be encrypted.

cipher

string

The cipher with which to encrypt the value, using the form "algorithm/mode/padding" or just "algorithm". Example: AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding.

alias

string

The key alias in the keystore, such as openidm-sym-default (deprecated) or a purpose defined in the secrets.json file, such as idm.password.encryption.

Returns

The value, encrypted with the specified cipher and key.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the object could not be encrypted.

openidm.decrypt(value)

This function decrypts a value.

Parameters
value

object

The value to be decrypted.

Returns

A deep copy of the value, with any encrypted value decrypted.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the object could not be decrypted for any reason. An error is thrown if the value is passed in as a string - it must be passed in an object.

openidm.isEncrypted(object)

This function determines if a value is encrypted.

Parameters
object to check

any

The object whose value should be checked to determine if it is encrypted.

Returns

Boolean, true if the value is encrypted, and false if it is not encrypted.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the server is unable to detect whether the value is encrypted, for any reason.

openidm.hash(value, algorithm, options)

This function calculates a value using a salted hash algorithm.

Table 1. Supported Hashing Algorithms and Configuration Properties
Algorithm Config Property and Description

BCRYPT

cost

Value between 4 and 31. Default is 13.

PBKDF2

hashLength

Byte-length of the generated hash. Default is 16.

saltLength

Byte-length of the salt value. Default is 16.

iterations

Number of cryptographic iterations. Default is 20000.

hmac

HMAC algorithm. Default is SHA3-256.

Supported values:

  • SHA-224

  • SHA-256

  • SHA-384

  • SHA-512

  • SHA3-224

  • SHA3-256

  • SHA3-384

  • SHA3-512

SCRYPT

hashLength

Byte-length of the generated hash, must be greater than or equal to 8. Default is 16.

saltLength

Byte-length of the salt value. Default is 16.

n

CPU/Memory cost. Must be greater than 1, a power of 2, and less than 2^(128 * r / 8). Default is 32768.

p

Parallelization. Must be a positive integer less than or equal to Integer.MAX_VALUE / (128 * r * 8). Default is 1.

r

Block size. Must be greater than or equal to 1. Default is 8.

SHA-256

saltLength

Byte-length of the salt value. Default is 16.

This is the default hashing.

SHA-384

saltLength

Byte-length of the salt value. Default is 16.

SHA-512

saltLength

Byte-length of the salt value. Default is 16.

Parameters
value

any

The value to be hashed.

algorithm

string (optional)

The hashing algorithm. Example: SHA-512.

If no algorithm is provided, a null value must be passed, and the algorithm defaults to SHA-256.

options

For JavaScript, JSON object (optional)

Configuration properties for the selected algorithm.

Returns

The value, calculated with the specified hash algorithm.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the object could not be hashed for any reason.

Examples
JavaScript
openidm.hash(\"dummy\", \"BCRYPT\", {\"cost\": 10})
openidm.isHashed(value)

This function detects whether a value has been calculated with a salted hash algorithm.

Parameters
value

any

The value to be reviewed.

Returns

Boolean, true if the value is hashed, and false otherwise.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the server is unable to detect whether the value is hashed, for any reason.

openidm.matches(string, value)

This function detects whether a string, when hashed, matches an existing hashed value.

Parameters
string

any

A string to be hashed.

value

any

A hashed value to compare to the string.

Returns

Boolean, true if the hash of the string matches the hashed value, and false otherwise.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the string could not be hashed.

1.1. Log functions

Identity Cloud also provides a logger object to access the Simple Logging Facade for Java (SLF4J) facilities. The following code shows an example of the logger object.

logger.info("Parameters passed in: {} {} {}", param1, param2, param3);

In addition, JavaScript has a useful logging function named console.log(). This function provides an easy way to dump data to the Identity Cloud standard output (usually the same output as the OSGi console). The function works well with the JavaScript built-in function JSON.stringify and provides fine-grained details about any given object. For example, the following line will print a formatted JSON structure that represents the HTTP request details to STDOUT.

console.log(JSON.stringify(context.http, null, 4));

The script engine supports the following log functions:

logger.debug(string message, object…​ params)

Logs a message at DEBUG level.

Parameters
message

string

The message format to log. Params replace {} in your message.

params

object

Arguments to include in the message.

Returns

A null value if successful.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the message could not be logged.

logger.error(string message, object…​ params)

Logs a message at ERROR level.

Parameters
message

string

The message format to log. Params replace {} in your message.

params

object

Arguments to include in the message.

Returns

A null value if successful.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the message could not be logged.

logger.info(string message, object…​ params)

Logs a message at INFO level.

Parameters
message

string

The message format to log. Params replace {} in your message.

params

object

Arguments to include in the message.

Returns

A null value if successful.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the message could not be logged.

logger.trace(string message, object…​ params)

Logs a message at TRACE level.

Parameters
message

string

The message format to log. Params replace {} in your message.

params

object

Arguments to include in the message.

Returns

A null value if successful.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the message could not be logged.

logger.warn(string message, object…​ params)

Logs a message at WARN level.

Parameters
message

string

The message format to log. Params replace {} in your message.

params

object

Arguments to include in the message.

Returns

A null value if successful.

Throws

An exception is thrown if the message could not be logged.

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