Quick introduction to ForgeRock® Identity Gateway for new users and readers evaluating the product.

Preface

ForgeRock Identity Platform™ is the only offering for access management, identity management, user-managed access, directory services, and an identity gateway, designed and built as a single, unified platform.

The platform includes the following components that extend what is available in open source projects to provide fully featured, enterprise-ready software:

  • ForgeRock Access Management (AM)

  • ForgeRock Identity Management (IDM)

  • ForgeRock Directory Services (DS)

  • ForgeRock Identity Gateway (IG)

1. About This Guide

IG integrates web applications, APIs, and microservices with the ForgeRock Identity Platform, without changing the application or container where they run. Based on reverse proxy architecture, it enforces security and access control in conjunction with AM modules.

This guide can help access management designers and administrators to install IG with a basic configuration, and start using the basic features of IG quickly and easily.

This guide assumes basic familiarity with the following topics:

  • HTTP, including how clients and servers exchange messages, and the role that a reverse proxy (gateway) plays

  • JSON, the format for IG configuration files

  • Managing services on operating systems and application servers

  • Configuring network connections on operating systems

2. Formatting Conventions

Most examples in the documentation are created in GNU/Linux or Mac OS X operating environments. If distinctions are necessary between operating environments, examples are labeled with the operating environment name in parentheses. To avoid repetition file system directory names are often given only in UNIX format as in /path/to/server, even if the text applies to C:\path\to\server as well.

Absolute path names usually begin with the placeholder /path/to/. This path might translate to /opt/, C:\Program Files\, or somewhere else on your system.

Command-line, terminal sessions are formatted as follows:

$ echo $JAVA_HOME
/path/to/jdk

Command output is sometimes formatted for narrower, more readable output even though formatting parameters are not shown in the command.

Program listings are formatted as follows:

class Test {
    public static void main(String [] args)  {
        System.out.println("This is a program listing.");
    }
}

3. Accessing Documentation Online

ForgeRock publishes comprehensive documentation online:

  • The ForgeRock Knowledge Base offers a large and increasing number of up-to-date, practical articles that help you deploy and manage ForgeRock software.

    While many articles are visible to community members, ForgeRock customers have access to much more, including advanced information for customers using ForgeRock software in a mission-critical capacity.

  • ForgeRock product documentation, such as this document, aims to be technically accurate and complete with respect to the software documented. It is visible to everyone and covers all product features and examples of how to use them.

4. Using the ForgeRock.org Site

The ForgeRock.org site has links to source code for ForgeRock open source software, as well as links to the ForgeRock forums and technical blogs.

If you are a ForgeRock customer, raise a support ticket instead of using the forums. ForgeRock support professionals will get in touch to help you.

5. Getting Support and Contacting ForgeRock

ForgeRock provides support services, professional services, classes through ForgeRock University, and partner services to assist you in setting up and maintaining your deployments. For a general overview of these services, see https://www.forgerock.com.

ForgeRock has staff members around the globe who support our international customers and partners. For details, visit https://www.forgerock.com, or send an email to ForgeRock at info@forgerock.com.

Chapter 1. IG At a Glance

This chapter provides a quick look at what is available in IG. For more information about the features of IG, see Chapter 1, "About Identity Gateway" in the Gateway Guide.

Most organizations have valuable existing services that are not easily integrated into newer architectures. These existing services cannot often be changed. Many client applications cannot communicate as they lack a gateway to bridge the gap. Figure 1.1, "Missing Gateway" illustrates one example of a missing gateway.

Figure 1.1. Missing Gateway
Missing Gateway

IG works as an HTTP gateway, based on reverse proxy architecture. IG is deployed on a network so it can intercept both client requests and server responses. Figure 1.2, "IG Deployed" illustrates a IG deployment.

Figure 1.2. IG Deployed
IG Deployed

Clients interact with protected servers through IG, which can be configured to add new capabilities to existing services without affecting current clients or servers.

The following list includes features that you can add to your solution by using IG:

  • Access management integration

  • Application and API security

  • Credential replay

  • OAuth 2.0 support

  • OpenID Connect 1.0 support

  • Network traffic control

  • Proxy with request and response capture

  • Request and response rewriting

  • SAML 2.0 federation support

  • SSO

Chapter 2. First Steps

This chapter describes how to quickly set up an instance of IG and use it as a gateway to access a sample application.

2.1. Software Requirements

2.2. Configuring the Network

Because IG uses reverse proxy architecture, you must configure the network so that traffic from the browser to the sample application goes through IG.

In this guide, IG and a sample application run on the same host as your browser, which is probably your laptop or desktop. Because network configuration is an important deployment step, the configuration in this chapter expects the sample application to run on app.example.com rather than localhost.

The quickest way to configure the network locally is to add an entry to your /etc/hosts file on UNIX systems or %SystemRoot%\system32\drivers\etc\hosts on Windows. For more information about host files, see the Wikipedia entry, Hosts (file).

Edit your /etc/hosts file as follows:

  • To run the browser, IG, and the sample application on the same host, add the following entry:

    127.0.0.1    localhost openig.example.com app.example.com

  • To run the browser on one host, and IG and the sample application on another host, add the IP address of the host running IG and the sample application to the hosts file on the system running the browser, where the host name matches that of sample application. For example, if IG and the sample application are running on a host with IP address 192.168.0.15, add the following entry:

    192.168.0.15    openig.example.com app.example.com

  • To run the sample application on a different host to IG, also make sure that the host name of the sample application resolves correctly for requests from IG to the application.

Tip

  • Some browsers cache IP address resolutions, even after clearing all browsing data. After changing the IP addresses of named hosts, restart the browser.

    To make sure DNS or host settings are configured correctly for remote systems, stop IG and then make sure you cannot reach the target application with the host name and port number of IG. If you can still reach it, double-check your host settings.

  • Make sure that name resolution is configured to check host files before DNS. For most UNIX systems, make sure that files is listed before dns in /etc/nsswitch.conf.

2.3. Installing IG

IG is installed in the root context of a web application container. For information about supported web application containers, see Section 2.3, "Web Application Containers" in the Release Notes.

This guide uses Jetty server. The example commands assume you install Jetty to /path/to/jetty, and after installation, you have a directory /path/to/jetty/webapps in which you install IG. If you use another directory structure, substitute the commands.

Procedure 2.1. To Install IG
  1. Download a supported version of Jetty server from its download page, and install it to /path/to/jetty.

  2. Download IG-5.5.0.war from the ForgeRock BackStage download site .

  3. Copy (or move) and rename the .war file:

    $ cp IG-5.5.0.war /path/to/jetty/webapps/root.war

    Jetty automatically deploys IG in the root context on startup.

  4. Start Jetty:

    • To start Jetty in the background, enter:

      $ /path/to/jetty/bin/jetty.sh start

    • To start Jetty in the foreground, enter:

      $ cd /path/to/jetty/
      $ java -jar start.jar

  5. Make sure that IG is running:

2.4. Installing the Sample Application

ForgeRock provides a mockup web application for testing IG configurations. The sample application is used in many of the tutorials in this guide and the Gateway Guide. This section describes how to download and run the sample application.

Procedure 2.2. Installing the Sample Application
  1. Download the sample application, IG-sample-application-5.5.0.jar, from the ForgeRock BackStage download site .

  2. Run the sample application:

    $ java -jar IG-sample-application-5.5.0.jar
    Preparing to listen for HTTP on port 8081.
    Preparing to listen for HTTPS on port 8444.
    The server will use a self-signed certificate not known to browsers.
    When using HTTPS with curl for example, try --insecure.
    Using OpenAM URL: http://openam.example.com:8088/openam/oauth2.
    Starting server...
    Sep 09, 2016 9:52:56 AM org.glassfish.grizzly.http.server.NetworkListener start
    INFO: Started listener bound to [0.0.0.0:8444]
    Sep 09, 2016 9:52:56 AM org.glassfish.grizzly.http.server.NetworkListener start
    INFO: Started listener bound to [0.0.0.0:8081]
    Sep 09, 2016 9:52:56 AM org.glassfish.grizzly.http.server.HttpServer start
    INFO: [HttpServer] Started.
    Press Ctrl+C to stop the server.

    By default, this server listens for HTTP on port 8081, and for HTTPS on port 8444. If one or both of those ports are not free, specify other ports:

    $ java -jar IG-sample-application-5.5.0.jar 8888 8889
    Preparing to listen for HTTP on port 8888.
    Preparing to listen for HTTPS on port 8889.
    The server will use a self-signed certificate not known to browsers.
    When using HTTPS with curl for example, try --insecure.
    Using OpenAM URL: http://openam.example.com:8088/openam/oauth2.
    Starting server...
    Sep 09, 2016 9:55:57 AM org.glassfish.grizzly.http.server.NetworkListener start
    INFO: Started listener bound to [0.0.0.0:8889]
    Sep 09, 2016 9:55:57 AM org.glassfish.grizzly.http.server.NetworkListener start
    INFO: Started listener bound to [0.0.0.0:8888]
    Sep 09, 2016 9:55:57 AM org.glassfish.grizzly.http.server.HttpServer start
    INFO: [HttpServer] Started.
    Press Ctrl+C to stop the server.

    If you change the port numbers when starting the server, also account for the differences when using the examples.

  3. Browse to http://localhost:8081/home to access the home page of the sample application.

    Some information about the browser request is displayed.

  4. Browse to http://localhost:8081/login to access the login page of the sample application, and then log in with username demo and password changeit.

    The username, demo, and some information about the browser request is displayed.

Procedure 2.3. Stopping and Restarting IG
  1. Stop Jetty:

    • If Jetty is running in the background, enter:

      $ /path/to/jetty/bin/jetty.sh stop

    • If Jetty is running in the foreground, enter Ctrl+c in the terminal where Jetty is running.

  2. Start Jetty:

    • To start Jetty in the background, enter:

      $ /path/to/jetty/bin/jetty.sh start

    • To start Jetty in the foreground, enter:

      $ cd /path/to/jetty/
      $ java -jar start.jar

2.5. Trying IG With a Simple Configuration

2.5.1. Adding a Base Configuration File

The entry point for requests coming in to IG is a JSON-encoded configuration file, expected by default at $HOME/.openig/config/config.json.

If IG doesn't find $HOME/.openig/config/config.json at startup, it uses its own, default config.json.

The config.json file initializes a heap of objects and provides the main Handler to receive incoming requests. For more information, see Heap Objects(5) in the Configuration Reference and Router(5) in the Configuration Reference.

If you edit config.json, stop and restart IG to take the changes into effect.

By default, the router defined in config.json looks for routes in $HOME/.openig/config/routes. For more information, see GatewayHttpApplication(5) in the Configuration Reference

Neither $HOME/.openig/config nor $HOME/.openig/config/routes are created automatically.

Procedure 2.4. To Configure the Base Configuration of IG
  1. Add the following file to the IG configuration as $HOME/.openig/config/config.json, on Windows add the file as %appdata%\OpenIG\config\config.json:

    {
      "handler": {
        "type": "Router",
        "name": "_router",
        "baseURI": "http://app.example.com:8081",
        "capture": "all"
      },
      "heap": [
        {
          "name": "JwtSession",
          "type": "JwtSession"
        },
        {
          "name": "capture",
          "type": "CaptureDecorator",
          "config": {
            "captureEntity": true,
            "_captureContext": true
          }
        }
      ]
    }

    Notice the following features of the file:

    • The handler contains a main router named _router. When IG receives an incoming request, _router routes the request to the first route in the configuration whose condition is satisfied.

    • The baseURI changes the request URI to point the request to the sample application.

    • The capture captures the body of the HTTP request and response.

  2. Stop and restart IG, as described in Procedure 2.3, "Stopping and Restarting IG".

    The Jetty log includes a message that the config is loaded from the new file:

    INFO  o.f.openig.web.Initializer -
    Reading the configuration from $HOME/.openig/config/config.json
          

To locate the %appdata% folder for your version of Windows, open Windows Explorer, enter %appdata% as the file path, and press Enter. You must create the %appdata%\OpenIG\config folder, and then copy the configuration files.

Before you use this base configuration in production, adjust the log level, and deactivate the CaptureDecorator that generates several log message lines for each request and response. Also consider editing the router based on recommendations described in Section 11.5, "Preventing the Reload of Routes" in the Gateway Guide.

Important

If you plan to create routes through IG Studio, make sure that config.json contains a main router named _router. For information about IG Studio, see Chapter 3, "Configuring Routes With IG Studio".

2.5.2. Adding a Default Route

Procedure 2.5. To Configure a Default Route
  • Add the following file to the IG configuration as $HOME/.openig/config/routes/zz-default.json, on Windows add the file as %appdata%\OpenIG\config\routes\zz-default.json:

    {
      "handler": "ClientHandler"
    }
    

    The Jetty log includes a message that the new file is loaded into the config:

    INFO  o.f.o.handler.router.RouterHandler -
    Loaded the route with id 'zz-default' registered with the name 'zz-default'

    Notice the following features of the route:

    • The route calls a ClientHandler with the default configuration. The ClientHandler simply proxies the request to the sample application and returns the response, without changing either the request or the response.

    • Because routes are loaded lexicographically in the configuration, firstly by name and then by ID, the filename of the default route is zz-default.json. Using a filename that starts with zz almost guarantees that the default route is the last route in the configuration, and therefore the last route to which requests are directed.

2.5.3. Testing the Setup

To test your configuration, make sure that IG and the sample application are running, and then browse to http://openig.example.com:8080/home. You should be directed to the home page of the sample application.

What just happened:

  • When you browsed to http://openig.example.com:8080/home, you connected to IG deployed in Jetty.

  • The baseURI in config.json changed the request URI to point the request to the sample application, and the capture captured the body of the HTTP request and response.

    The main router in config.json routed the request to the IG configuration.

  • Because there was no other route in the IG configuration, the request was routed to zz-default.json. This default route called a ClientHandler, which submitted the request to the sample application and returned the response without changing either the request or the response.

  • The browser request was sent unchanged to the sample application, and the response from the sample application was returned unchanged to the browser.

2.6. Adding a Route to the IG Configuration

In the previous section you set up IG to proxy requests to the home page of the sample application. In this section, you add a route to log you in to the sample application automatically.

Figure 2.1, "Log in With Hard-Coded Credentials" shows the steps to log in to the sample application by using hard-coded credentials.

Figure 2.1. Log in With Hard-Coded Credentials


  1. The browser host makes a DNS request for the IP address of the HTTP server host, openig.example.com.

  2. DNS responds with the address for IG.

  3. Browser sends a request to the HTTP server.

  4. IG replaces the browser's original HTTP GET request with an HTTP POST login request containing credentials to authenticate. As a result, instead of returning the login page with a login form, IG logs you in directly.

  5. The sample application responds with the page you see after logging in.

  6. IG returns this response to your browser.

2.6.1. Configuring IG to Log You In With Credentials

Procedure 2.6. To Configure IG to Log You In With Credentials
  • Add the following file to the IG configuration as $HOME/.openig/config/routes/01-static.json, on Windows add the file as %appdata%\OpenIG\config\routes\01-static.json:

    {
      "handler": {
        "type": "Chain",
        "config": {
          "filters": [
            {
              "type": "StaticRequestFilter",
              "config": {
                "method": "POST",
                "uri": "http://app.example.com:8081/login",
                "form": {
                  "username": [
                    "demo"
                  ],
                  "password": [
                    "changeit"
                  ]
                }
              }
            }
          ],
          "handler": "ClientHandler"
        }
      },
      "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/static')}"
    }
    

    The Jetty log includes a message that the new file is loaded into the config:

    INFO  o.f.o.handler.router.RouterHandler -
    Loaded the route with id '01-static' registered with the name '01-static'

    By default, routes in the $HOME/.openig/config/routes directory are loaded and updated without restarting IG.

    Because routes are loaded lexicographically in the configuration, firstly by name and then by ID, 01-static.json is loaded into the configuration before zz-default.json.

2.6.2. Testing the Setup

To test your configuration, make sure that IG and the sample application are running, and then browse to http://openig.example.com:8080/static. You should be directed to the sample application and logged in automatically as demo.

What just happened:

  • When you browsed to http://openig.example.com:8080/static, you connected to IG deployed in Jetty, and the request was routed to 01-static.json.

  • The StaticRequestFilter replaced the request with an HTTP POST request, including the login form with hard-coded credentials.

  • The sample application validated the credentials, and responded with the profile page.

  • The ClientHandler proxied the request to the sample application and returned the response.

  • IG passed the response back to the browser.

Chapter 3. Configuring Routes With IG Studio

IG Studio is a user interface to configure and deploy routes in IG. IG Studio provides an easy way to evaluate or demo IG, or to develop new configurations on a single instance.

You can use IG Studio to create routes for many applications, such as authenticating users, authorizing access to APIs, throttling requests to protected applications, capturing messages, and collecting statistics.

IG Studio runs only when IG is in development (mutable) mode. When IG is in production (immutable) mode you cannot change your configuration. In this mode, IG Studio is effectively disabled. For more information about production and development modes, see Section 2.8, "Making the Configuration Immutable" in the Gateway Guide.

Important

IG Studio deploys and undeploys routes through a main router named _router, which is the name of the main router in the default configuration. If you use a custom config.json, make sure that it contains a main router named _router.

3.1. Accessing IG Studio

When IG is installed and running as described in Chapter 2, "First Steps", access IG Studio on http://openig.example.com:8080/openig/studio. The welcome screen is displayed.

Welcome screen of IG Studio

The following tables summarize the basic tasks in IG Studio, and the route status:

Table 3.1. Task Reference

To do this

Do this

Create a new route

Select ROUTES or Protect an Application, and start creating a new route.

Select a route

Select ROUTES, and then select a route to view.

Display the config of a selected route

Select a route, and then select and Display.

Deploy a selected route

Select a route, and then select Deploy.

Undeploy a selected route

Select a deployed route, and then select and Undeploy.

Change the basic config of a selected route

Select a route, and then select Route settings. Edit the route and save the changes.


Table 3.2. Route Status

Status

Description

Action

Undeployed

The route has been created and saved in IG Studio or has been imported into IG Studio, but does not exist in the backend.

Deploy the route. The status changes to Deployed.

Deployed

The route is saved in IG Studio and deployed to the backend.

No action required. The route has the same configuration in IG Studio and the backend.

Changes pending

The route has been deployed and then subsequently changed in IG Studio.

Deploy the route. The status changes to Deployed.

Out of sync

The route has been deployed and then subsequently changed in the backend, or in both IG Studio and the backend.

Select Deploy. A message informs you that a different version of the route is deployed in the backend. Select Deploy or Import a route.

Deploy: The version in IG Studio overwrites the backend.

Import a route: The version in the backend overwrites IG Studio.

When you import a route into IG Studio you go into editor mode. You can use the JSON editor to manually edit the route, but can no longer use the full IG Studio interface to add or edit filters.


3.2. Creating Simple Routes

This section describes procedures to configure the basic settings for a route in IG Studio. After creating a route, you can always edit its basic settings by selecting Route settings on the top-right of the screen.

Procedure 3.1. To Create a Simple Route

This procedure bypasses some of the steps of Procedure 3.2, "To Create a Route With Advanced Options" by using a path condition, and matching the route name to the condition.

  1. Access IG Studio on http://openig.example.com:8080/openig/studio, and select Protect an Application.

  2. In Application URL, enter a URL for the application you want to protect followed by a path condition, and then select Create route.

    For example, to allow requests to access the sample application on the my-basic-route path, enter http://app.example.com:8081/my-basic-route.

  3. On the top-right of the screen, select and Display.

    A route similar to this should be displayed, where the path condition is used for the route name:

    {
      "name": "my-basic-route",
      "baseURI": "http://app.example.com:8081",
      "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/my-basic-route')}",
      "monitor": false,
      "handler": "ClientHandler"
    }

Procedure 3.2. To Create a Route With Advanced Options
  1. Access IG Studio on http://openig.example.com:8080/openig/studio, and select Protect an Application.

  2. In the Create a route window, enter a URL for the application you want to protect, and then select Create route. For example, to protect the sample application, enter http://app.example.com:8081.

  3. (Optional) In Condition, select Path or Expression, and then enter a condition for the route. For example, to allow only requests on the path /mypath, select Path and enter /mypath.

    The route can handle requests that meet the condition you specify. If you don't specify a condition, the route can handle all requests.

    For information about route conditions, see Section 11.2.2, "Setting Route Conditions" in the Gateway Guide.

  4. In Name, enter a unique name for the route. The name is used to order the routes lexicographically in the configuration. For example, enter the name my route.

    The route ID is filled automatically when you enter a name, and any spaces are replaced by dashes. You can change the name and ID independently. For information about how route names, IDs, and filenames are used in the configuration, see Section 11.2.3, " Configuring Route Names, IDs, and Filenames " in the Gateway Guide.

  5. Select Create route, and then on the top-right of the screen, select and Display.

    A route similar to this should be displayed:

    {
      "name": "my route",
      "baseURI": "http://app.example.com:8081",
      "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/mypath')}",
      "monitor": false,
      "handler": "ClientHandler"
    }

3.3. Deploying Routes to Your Configuration

After creating or importing a route in IG Studio, deploy it to you IG configuration for testing.

Procedure 3.3. To Deploy a Route to Your Configuration
  1. In IG Studio, select ROUTES and then select a route.

  2. On the top-right of the screen, select and Display, and then check the configuration. If the route is okay, select Deploy to push the route to the IG configuration.

    The route status Deployed is displayed, and the Deploy button is grey and disabled.

  3. Check the $HOME/.openig/config/routes folder in your IG configuration to see that the route is there.

    By default, routes are loaded automatically into the IG configuration. You don't need to stop and restart IG. For information about reloading routes, see Section 11.5, "Preventing the Reload of Routes" in the Gateway Guide.

  4. Check the system log messages to confirm that the route was loaded succesfully into the configuration. For information about logs, see Chapter 16, "Logging Events" in the Gateway Guide.

Procedure 3.4. To Undeploy a Route
  1. In IG Studio, select ROUTES and then select a route.

  2. On the top-right of the screen, select and Undeploy, and then confirm your request.

    The route is removed from the IG configuration. On the IG Studio screen, the route status Deployed is no longer displayed, and the Deploy option is active again.

3.4. Adding Filters to a Route

For routes created in IG Studio, you can use the full interface of IG Studio to add filters. For examples, see the following sections of the Gateway Guide:

Filters are added to a chain that ends with a ClientHandler. To view the chain, select Chain on the right of the screen. For information about chains, see Chain(5) in the Configuration Reference.

Note the following ways to manage filters in a chain:

  • To move a filter to another position in the chain, simply drag it.

  • To edit a filter in the chain, select for the filter.

  • To remove a filter from the chain, deselect ENABLED. The filter is disabled and removed from the chain. If you enable the filter again, the configuration is restored, and you don't have to enter the data again.

  • To add a disabled filter back in the chain, select ENABLED.

Procedure 3.5. To Add Other Filters to a Route
  1. In IG Studio, select ROUTES and then select a route.

  2. Select Other filters, New filter, and then Other filter.

  3. In Type, select a filter type from the list, and then optionally enter a name and configuration for the filter.

    Note

    IG Studio checks that the JSON is valid, but doesn't check that the configuration of the filter is valid. If the filter configuration isn't valid, the route fails to load when deployed.

    When you save, the filter is added to the chain.

  4. Deploy the route as described in Section 3.3, "Deploying Routes to Your Configuration".

3.5. Editing and Redeploying Routes

Procedure 3.6. To Edit and Redeploy a Route
  1. In IG Studio, select ROUTES and then select a route.

  2. Edit the route in IG Studio or manually:

    • To edit in IG Studio, select options offered in IG Studio.

    • To edit manually, select and Editor mode, and use the JSON editor to edit the route.

      Important

      When you go into editor mode, you can use the JSON editor to manually edit the route, but can no longer use the full IG Studio interface to add or edit filters.

    The route status is Changes pending.

  3. Deploy the route as described in Procedure 3.3, "To Deploy a Route to Your Configuration".

3.6. Importing Routes Into IG Studio

Important

When you import a route into IG Studio you go into editor mode. You can use the JSON editor to manually edit the route, but can no longer use the full IG Studio interface to add or edit filters.

Procedure 3.7. To Import a Route Into IG Studio
  1. In IG Studio, select ROUTES and then select a route.

  2. Click in the window to import a route, or drag a route from your filesystem.

    If the route has a name property, the name is automatically used for the Name and ID fields in IG Studio.

  3. If necessary, make the following changes, and then select Import:

    • If the Name and ID fields are empty, enter a unique name and ID for the route.

    • If the Name and ID fields are outlined in red, the route name or ID already exists in IG Studio. Change the name and ID to be unique.

    • If an error message is displayed, the route is not valid JSON. Fix the route and then try again to import it.

    The route is displayed in the editor window.

  4. Deploy the route as described in Section 3.3, "Deploying Routes to Your Configuration".

3.7. Viewing and Searching for Routes in Your Configuration

All of the routes that exist in your backend configuration are displayed on the ROUTES page, including imported routes and routes created outside of IG Studio.

To search for a route, select ROUTES, and type part of the name or URL of the route in the search box (). Routes that match are displayed as you enter the search criteria.

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