Reference documentation for ForgeRock® Identity Gateway.

Preface

ForgeRock Identity Platform™ is the only offering for access management, identity management, user-managed access, directory services, and an identity gateway, designed and built as a single, unified platform.

The platform includes the following components that extend what is available in open source projects to provide fully featured, enterprise-ready software:

  • ForgeRock Access Management (AM)

  • ForgeRock Identity Management (IDM)

  • ForgeRock Directory Services (DS)

  • ForgeRock Identity Gateway (IG)

  • ForgeRock Identity Message Broker (IMB)

1. About This Guide

This guide describes in detail the configuration options for IG. It is for IG designers, developers, and administrators.

For API specifications, see the appropriate Javadoc.

2. Reserved Routes

By default, IG reserves all paths starting with /openig for administrative use, and only local client applications can access resources exposed under /openig.

To change the base for administrative routes, edit admin.json. For more information, see AdminHttpApplication(5).

3. Reserved Field Names

IG reserves all configuration field names that contain only alphanumeric characters.

If you must define your own field names, for example, in custom decorators, use names with dots, ., or dashes, -. Examples include my-decorator and com.example.myDecorator.

4. Field Value Conventions

IG configuration uses JSON notation.

This reference uses the following terms when referring to values of configuration object fields:

array

JSON array.

boolean

Either true or false.

configuration token

Configuration tokens introduce variables into the server configuration. They can take values from Java system properties, environment variables, JSON and Java properties files held in specified directories, and from properties configured in routes.

For more information, see JSON Evaluation(5).

duration

A duration is a lapse of time expressed in English, such as 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds. Durations are not case sensitive, and negative durations are not supported. The following units can be used in durations:

  • indefinite, infinity, undefined, unlimited: unlimited duration

  • zero, disabled: zero-length duration

  • days, day, d: days

  • hours, hour, h: hours

  • minutes, minute, min, m: minutes

  • seconds, second, sec, s: seconds

  • milliseconds, millisecond, millisec, millis, milli, ms: milliseconds

  • microseconds, microsecond, microsec, micros, micro, us, µs: microseconds

  • nanoseconds, nanosecond, nanosec, nanos, nano, ns: nanoseconds

expression

See Expressions(5).

configuration expression

Expression evaluated at configuration time, when routes are loaded.

Configuration expressions can refer to the system heap properties, the built-in functions listed in Functions(5), the ${env['variable']}, and ${system['property']}. Because configuration expressions are evaluated before any requests are made, they cannot refer to the runtime properties, request, response, or context. For more information, see Expressions(5).

runtime expression

Expression evaluated at runtime, for each request and response.

Runtime expressions can refer to the same information as configuration expressions, plus the following objects:

instant

An instantaneous point on the timeline, as a Java type. For more information, see Class Instant.

lvalue-expression

Expression yielding an object whose value is to be set.

number

JSON number.

object

JSON object where the content depends on the object's type.

pattern

A regular expression according to the rules for the Java Pattern class.

pattern-template

Template for referencing capturing groups in a pattern by using $n, where n is the index number of the capturing group starting from zero.

For example, if the pattern is "\w+\s*=\s*(\w)+", the pattern-template is "$1", and the text to match is "key = value", the pattern-template yields "value".

reference

References an object in the following ways:

  • An inline configuration object, where the name is optional.

  • A configuration expression that is a string or contains variable elements that evaluate to a string, where the string is the name of an object declared in the heap.

    For example, the following temporaryStorage object takes the value of the system property openig.storage.ref, which must a be string equivalent to the name of an object defined in the heap:

    {
      "temporaryStorage": "${system['openig.storage.ref']}"
    }

string

JSON string.

5. About ForgeRock Common REST

ForgeRock® Common REST is a common REST API framework. It works across the ForgeRock platform to provide common ways to access web resources and collections of resources. Adapt the examples in this section to your resources and deployment.

5.1. Common REST Resources

Servers generally return JSON-format resources, though resource formats can depend on the implementation.

Resources in collections can be found by their unique identifiers (IDs). IDs are exposed in the resource URIs. For example, if a server has a user collection under /users, then you can access a user at /users/user-id. The ID is also the value of the _id field of the resource.

Resources are versioned using revision numbers. A revision is specified in the resource's _rev field. Revisions make it possible to figure out whether to apply changes without resource locking and without distributed transactions.

5.2. Common REST Verbs

The Common REST APIs use the following verbs, sometimes referred to collectively as CRUDPAQ. For details and HTTP-based examples of each, follow the links to the sections for each verb.

Create

Add a new resource.

This verb maps to HTTP PUT or HTTP POST.

For details, see Section 5.6, "Create".

Read

Retrieve a single resource.

This verb maps to HTTP GET.

For details, see Section 5.7, "Read".

Update

Replace an existing resource.

This verb maps to HTTP PUT.

For details, see Section 5.8, "Update".

Delete

Remove an existing resource.

This verb maps to HTTP DELETE.

For details, see Section 5.9, "Delete".

Patch

Modify part of an existing resource.

This verb maps to HTTP PATCH.

For details, see Section 5.10, "Patch".

Action

Perform a predefined action.

This verb maps to HTTP POST.

For details, see Section 5.11, "Action".

Query

Search a collection of resources.

This verb maps to HTTP GET.

For details, see Section 5.12, "Query".

5.3. Common REST Parameters

Common REST reserved query string parameter names start with an underscore, _.

Reserved query string parameters include, but are not limited to, the following names:

_action
_api
_crestapi
_fields
_mimeType
_pageSize
_pagedResultsCookie
_pagedResultsOffset
_prettyPrint
_queryExpression
_queryFilter
_queryId
_sortKeys
_totalPagedResultsPolicy

Note

Some parameter values are not safe for URLs, so URL-encode parameter values as necessary.

Continue reading for details about how to use each parameter.

5.4. Common REST Extension Points

The action verb is the main vehicle for extensions. For example, to create a new user with HTTP POST rather than HTTP PUT, you might use /users?_action=create. A server can define additional actions. For example, /tasks/1?_action=cancel.

A server can define stored queries to call by ID. For example, /groups?_queryId=hasDeletedMembers. Stored queries can call for additional parameters. The parameters are also passed in the query string. Which parameters are valid depends on the stored query.

5.5. Common REST API Documentation

Common REST APIs often depend at least in part on runtime configuration. Many Common REST endpoints therefore serve API descriptors at runtime. An API descriptor documents the actual API as it is configured.

Use the following query string parameters to retrieve API descriptors:

_api

Serves an API descriptor that complies with the OpenAPI specification.

This API descriptor represents the API accessible over HTTP. It is suitable for use with popular tools such as Swagger UI.

_crestapi

Serves a native Common REST API descriptor.

This API descriptor provides a compact representation that is not dependent on the transport protocol. It requires a client that understands Common REST, as it omits many Common REST defaults.

Note

Consider limiting access to API descriptors in production environments in order to avoid unnecessary traffic.

To provide documentation in production environments, see Procedure 1, "To Publish OpenAPI Documentation" instead.

Procedure 1. To Publish OpenAPI Documentation

In production systems, developers expect stable, well-documented APIs. Rather than retrieving API descriptors at runtime through Common REST, prepare final versions, and publish them alongside the software in production.

Use the OpenAPI-compliant descriptors to provide API reference documentation for your developers as described in the following steps:

  1. Configure the software to produce production-ready APIs.

    In other words, the software should be configured as in production so that the APIs are identical to what developers see in production.

  2. Retrieve the OpenAPI-compliant descriptor.

    The following command saves the descriptor to a file, myapi.json:

    $ curl -o myapi.json endpoint?_api
        
  3. (Optional) If necessary, edit the descriptor.

    For example, you might want to add security definitions to describe how the API is protected.

    If you make any changes, then also consider using a source control system to manage your versions of the API descriptor.

  4. Publish the descriptor using a tool such as Swagger UI.

    You can customize Swagger UI for your organization as described in the documentation for the tool.

5.6. Create

There are two ways to create a resource, either with an HTTP POST or with an HTTP PUT.

To create a resource using POST, perform an HTTP POST with the query string parameter _action=create and the JSON resource as a payload. Accept a JSON response. The server creates the identifier if not specified:

POST /users?_action=create HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
Content-Length: ...
Content-Type: application/json
{ JSON resource }
  

To create a resource using PUT, perform an HTTP PUT including the case-sensitive identifier for the resource in the URL path, and the JSON resource as a payload. Use the If-None-Match: * header. Accept a JSON response:

PUT /users/some-id HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
Content-Length: ...
Content-Type: application/json
If-None-Match: *
{ JSON resource }
  

The _id and content of the resource depend on the server implementation. The server is not required to use the _id that the client provides. The server response to the create request indicates the resource location as the value of the Location header.

If you include the If-None-Match header, its value must be *. In this case, the request creates the object if it does not exist, and fails if the object does exist. If you include the If-None-Match header with any value other than *, the server returns an HTTP 400 Bad Request error. For example, creating an object with If-None-Match: revision returns a bad request error. If you do not include If-None-Match: *, the request creates the object if it does not exist, and updates the object if it does exist.

Parameters

You can use the following parameters:

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

_fields=field[,field...]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

5.7. Read

To retrieve a single resource, perform an HTTP GET on the resource by its case-sensitive identifier (_id) and accept a JSON response:

GET /users/some-id HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
  
Parameters

You can use the following parameters:

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

_fields=field[,field...]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

_mimeType=mime-type

Some resources have fields whose values are multi-media resources such as a profile photo for example.

By specifying both a single field and also the mime-type for the response content, you can read a single field value that is a multi-media resource.

In this case, the content type of the field value returned matches the mime-type that you specify, and the body of the response is the multi-media resource.

The Accept header is not used in this case. For example, Accept: image/png does not work. Use the _mimeType query string parameter instead.

5.8. Update

To update a resource, perform an HTTP PUT including the case-sensitive identifier (_id) as the final element of the path to the resource, and the JSON resource as the payload. Use the If-Match: _rev header to check that you are actually updating the version you modified. Use If-Match: * if the version does not matter. Accept a JSON response:

PUT /users/some-id HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
Content-Length: ...
Content-Type: application/json
If-Match: _rev
{ JSON resource }
  

When updating a resource, include all the attributes to be retained. Omitting an attribute in the resource amounts to deleting the attribute unless it is not under the control of your application. Attributes not under the control of your application include private and read-only attributes. In addition, virtual attributes and relationship references might not be under the control of your application.

Parameters

You can use the following parameters:

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

_fields=field[,field...]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

5.9. Delete

To delete a single resource, perform an HTTP DELETE by its case-sensitive identifier (_id) and accept a JSON response:

DELETE /users/some-id HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
  
Parameters

You can use the following parameters:

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

_fields=field[,field...]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

5.10. Patch

To patch a resource, send an HTTP PATCH request with the following parameters:

  • operation

  • field

  • value

  • from (optional with copy and move operations)

You can include these parameters in the payload for a PATCH request, or in a JSON PATCH file. If successful, you'll see a JSON response similar to:

PATCH /users/some-id HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
Content-Length: ...
Content-Type: application/json
If-Match: _rev
{ JSON array of patch operations }
  

PATCH operations apply to three types of targets:

  • single-valued, such as an object, string, boolean, or number.

  • list semantics array, where the elements are ordered, and duplicates are allowed.

  • set semantics array, where the elements are not ordered, and duplicates are not allowed.

ForgeRock PATCH supports several different operations. The following sections show each of these operations, along with options for the field and value:

5.10.1. Patch Operation: Add

The add operation ensures that the target field contains the value provided, creating parent fields as necessary.

If the target field is single-valued, then the value you include in the PATCH replaces the value of the target. Examples of a single-valued field include: object, string, boolean, or number.

An add operation has different results on two standard types of arrays:

  • List semantic arrays: you can run any of these add operations on that type of array:

    • If you add an array of values, the PATCH operation appends it to the existing list of values.

    • If you add a single value, specify an ordinal element in the target array, or use the {-} special index to add that value to the end of the list.

  • Set semantic arrays: The list of values included in a patch are merged with the existing set of values. Any duplicates within the array are removed.

As an example, start with the following list semantic array resource:

{
    "fruits" : [ "orange", "apple" ]
}

The following add operation includes the pineapple to the end of the list of fruits, as indicated by the - at the end of the fruits array.

{
    "operation" : "add",
    "field" : "/fruits/-",
    "value" : "pineapple"
}

The following is the resulting resource:

{
    "fruits" : [ "orange", "apple", "pineapple" ]
}

5.10.2. Patch Operation: Copy

The copy operation takes one or more existing values from the source field. It then adds those same values on the target field. Once the values are known, it is equivalent to performing an add operation on the target field.

The following copy operation takes the value from a field named mail, and then runs a replace operation on the target field, another_mail.

[
  {
     "operation":"copy",
     "from":"mail",
     "field":"another_mail"
  }
]

If the source field value and the target field value are configured as arrays, the result depends on whether the array has list semantics or set semantics, as described in Section 5.10.1, "Patch Operation: Add".

5.10.3. Patch Operation: Increment

The increment operation changes the value or values of the target field by the amount you specify. The value that you include must be one number, and may be positive or negative. The value of the target field must accept numbers. The following increment operation adds 1000 to the target value of /user/payment.

[
  {
    "operation" : "increment",
    "field" : "/user/payment",
    "value" : "1000"
  }
]

Since the value of the increment is a single number, arrays do not apply.

5.10.4. Patch Operation: Move

The move operation removes existing values on the source field. It then adds those same values on the target field. It is equivalent to performing a remove operation on the source, followed by an add operation with the same values, on the target.

The following move operation is equivalent to a remove operation on the source field, surname, followed by a replace operation on the target field value, lastName. If the target field does not exist, it is created.

[
  {
     "operation":"move",
     "from":"surname",
     "field":"lastName"
  }
]

To apply a move operation on an array, you need a compatible single-value, list semantic array, or set semantic array on both the source and the target. For details, see the criteria described in Section 5.10.1, "Patch Operation: Add".

5.10.5. Patch Operation: Remove

The remove operation ensures that the target field no longer contains the value provided. If the remove operation does not include a value, the operation removes the field. The following remove deletes the value of the phoneNumber, along with the field.

[
  {
    "operation" : "remove",
    "field" : "phoneNumber"
  }
]

If the object has more than one phoneNumber, those values are stored as an array.

A remove operation has different results on two standard types of arrays:

  • List semantic arrays: A remove operation deletes the specified element in the array. For example, the following operation removes the first phone number, based on its array index (zero-based):

    [
       {
          "operation" : "remove",
          "field" : "/phoneNumber/0"
       }
    ]
  • Set semantic arrays: The list of values included in a patch are removed from the existing array.

5.10.6. Patch Operation: Replace

The replace operation removes any existing value(s) of the targeted field, and replaces them with the provided value(s). It is essentially equivalent to a remove followed by a add operation. If the arrays are used, the criteria is based on Section 5.10.1, "Patch Operation: Add". However, indexed updates are not allowed, even when the target is an array.

The following replace operation removes the existing telephoneNumber value for the user, and then adds the new value of +1 408 555 9999.

[
  {
    "operation" : "replace",
    "field" : "/telephoneNumber",
    "value" : "+1 408 555 9999"
  }
]

A PATCH replace operation on a list semantic array works in the same fashion as a PATCH remove operation. The following example demonstrates how the effect of both operations. Start with the following resource:

{
    "fruits" : [ "apple", "orange", "kiwi", "lime" ],
}

Apply the following operations on that resource:

[
  {
    "operation" : "remove",
    "field" : "/fruits/0",
    "value" : ""
  },
  {
    "operation" : "replace",
    "field" : "/fruits/1",
    "value" : "pineapple"
  }
]

The PATCH operations are applied sequentially. The remove operation removes the first member of that resource, based on its array index, (fruits/0), with the following result:

[
  {
    "fruits" : [ "orange", "kiwi", "lime" ],
  }
]

The second PATCH operation, a replace, is applied on the second member (fruits/1) of the intermediate resource, with the following result:

[
  {
    "fruits" : [ "orange", "pineapple", "lime" ],
  }
]

5.10.7. Patch Operation: Transform

The transform operation changes the value of a field based on a script or some other data transformation command. The following transform operation takes the value from the field named /objects, and applies the something.js script as shown:

[
  {
    "operation" : "transform",
    "field" : "/objects",
    "value" : {
      "script" : {
        "type" : "text/javascript",
        "file" : "something.js"
      }
    }
  }
]

5.10.8. Patch Operation Limitations

Some HTTP client libraries do not support the HTTP PATCH operation. Make sure that the library you use supports HTTP PATCH before using this REST operation.

For example, the Java Development Kit HTTP client does not support PATCH as a valid HTTP method. Instead, the method HttpURLConnection.setRequestMethod("PATCH") throws ProtocolException.

Parameters

You can use the following parameters. Other parameters might depend on the specific action implementation:

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

_fields=field[,field...]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

5.11. Action

Actions are a means of extending Common REST APIs and are defined by the resource provider, so the actions you can use depend on the implementation.

The standard action indicated by _action=create is described in Section 5.6, "Create".

Parameters

You can use the following parameters. Other parameters might depend on the specific action implementation:

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

_fields=field[,field...]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

5.12. Query

To query a resource collection (or resource container if you prefer to think of it that way), perform an HTTP GET and accept a JSON response, including at least a _queryExpression, _queryFilter, or _queryId parameter. These parameters cannot be used together:

GET /users?_queryFilter=true HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
  

The server returns the result as a JSON object including a "results" array and other fields related to the query string parameters that you specify.

Parameters

You can use the following parameters:

_queryFilter=filter-expression

Query filters request that the server return entries that match the filter expression. You must URL-escape the filter expression.

The string representation is summarized as follows. Continue reading for additional explanation:

Expr           = OrExpr
OrExpr         = AndExpr ( 'or' AndExpr ) *
AndExpr        = NotExpr ( 'and' NotExpr ) *
NotExpr        = '!' PrimaryExpr | PrimaryExpr
PrimaryExpr    = '(' Expr ')' | ComparisonExpr | PresenceExpr | LiteralExpr
ComparisonExpr = Pointer OpName JsonValue
PresenceExpr   = Pointer 'pr'
LiteralExpr    = 'true' | 'false'
Pointer        = JSON pointer
OpName         = 'eq' |  # equal to
                 'co' |  # contains
                 'sw' |  # starts with
                 'lt' |  # less than
                 'le' |  # less than or equal to
                 'gt' |  # greater than
                 'ge' |  # greater than or equal to
                 STRING  # extended operator
JsonValue      = NUMBER | BOOLEAN | '"' UTF8STRING '"'
STRING         = ASCII string not containing white-space
UTF8STRING     = UTF-8 string possibly containing white-space
     

JsonValue components of filter expressions follow RFC 7159: The JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) Data Interchange Format. In particular, as described in section 7 of the RFC, the escape character in strings is the backslash character. For example, to match the identifier test\, use _id eq 'test\\'. In the JSON resource, the \ is escaped the same way: "_id":"test\\".

When using a query filter in a URL, be aware that the filter expression is part of a query string parameter. A query string parameter must be URL encoded as described in RFC 3986: Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax For example, white space, double quotes ("), parentheses, and exclamation characters need URL encoding in HTTP query strings. The following rules apply to URL query components:

query       = *( pchar / "/" / "?" )
pchar       = unreserved / pct-encoded / sub-delims / ":" / "@"
unreserved  = ALPHA / DIGIT / "-" / "." / "_" / "~"
pct-encoded = "%" HEXDIG HEXDIG
sub-delims  = "!" / "$" / "&" / "'" / "(" / ")"
                  / "*" / "+" / "," / ";" / "="
     

ALPHA, DIGIT, and HEXDIG are core rules of RFC 5234: Augmented BNF for Syntax Specifications:

ALPHA       =  %x41-5A / %x61-7A   ; A-Z / a-z
DIGIT       =  %x30-39             ; 0-9
HEXDIG      =  DIGIT / "A" / "B" / "C" / "D" / "E" / "F"
     

As a result, a backslash escape character in a JsonValue component is percent-encoded in the URL query string parameter as %5C. To encode the query filter expression _id eq 'test\\', use _id+eq+'test%5C%5C', for example.

A simple filter expression can represent a comparison, presence, or a literal value.

For comparison expressions use json-pointer comparator json-value, where the comparator is one of the following:

eq (equals)
co (contains)
sw (starts with)
lt (less than)
le (less than or equal to)
gt (greater than)
ge (greater than or equal to)

For presence, use json-pointer pr to match resources where:

  • The JSON pointer is present.

  • The value it points to is not null.

Literal values include true (match anything) and false (match nothing).

Complex expressions employ and, or, and ! (not), with parentheses, (expression), to group expressions.

_queryId=identifier

Specify a query by its identifier.

Specific queries can take their own query string parameter arguments, which depend on the implementation.

_pagedResultsCookie=string

The string is an opaque cookie used by the server to keep track of the position in the search results. The server returns the cookie in the JSON response as the value of pagedResultsCookie.

In the request _pageSize must also be set and non-zero. You receive the cookie value from the provider on the first request, and then supply the cookie value in subsequent requests until the server returns a null cookie, meaning that the final page of results has been returned.

The _pagedResultsCookie parameter is supported when used with the _queryFilter parameter. The _pagedResultsCookie parameter is not guaranteed to work when used with the _queryExpression and _queryId parameters.

The _pagedResultsCookie and _pagedResultsOffset parameters are mutually exclusive, and not to be used together.

_pagedResultsOffset=integer

When _pageSize is non-zero, use this as an index in the result set indicating the first page to return.

The _pagedResultsCookie and _pagedResultsOffset parameters are mutually exclusive, and not to be used together.

_pageSize=integer

Return query results in pages of this size. After the initial request, use _pagedResultsCookie or _pageResultsOffset to page through the results.

_totalPagedResultsPolicy=string

When a _pageSize is specified, and non-zero, the server calculates the "totalPagedResults", in accordance with the totalPagedResultsPolicy, and provides the value as part of the response. The "totalPagedResults" is either an estimate of the total number of paged results (_totalPagedResultsPolicy=ESTIMATE), or the exact total result count (_totalPagedResultsPolicy=EXACT). If no count policy is specified in the query, or if _totalPagedResultsPolicy=NONE, result counting is disabled, and the server returns value of -1 for "totalPagedResults".

_sortKeys=[+-]field[,[+-]field...]

Sort the resources returned based on the specified field(s), either in + (ascending, default) order, or in - (descending) order.

Because ascending order is the default, including the + character in the query is unnecessary. If you do include the +, it must be URL-encoded as %2B, for example:

http://localhost:8080/api/users?_prettyPrint=true&_queryFilter=true&_sortKeys=%2Bname/givenName

The _sortKeys parameter is not supported for predefined queries (_queryId).

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

_fields=field[,field...]

Return only the specified fields in each element of the "results" array in the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

5.13. HTTP Status Codes

When working with a Common REST API over HTTP, client applications should expect at least the following HTTP status codes. Not all servers necessarily return all status codes identified here:

200 OK

The request was successful and a resource returned, depending on the request.

201 Created

The request succeeded and the resource was created.

204 No Content

The action request succeeded, and there was no content to return.

304 Not Modified

The read request included an If-None-Match header, and the value of the header matched the revision value of the resource.

400 Bad Request

The request was malformed.

401 Unauthorized

The request requires user authentication.

403 Forbidden

Access was forbidden during an operation on a resource.

404 Not Found

The specified resource could not be found, perhaps because it does not exist.

405 Method Not Allowed

The HTTP method is not allowed for the requested resource.

406 Not Acceptable

The request contains parameters that are not acceptable, such as a resource or protocol version that is not available.

409 Conflict

The request would have resulted in a conflict with the current state of the resource.

410 Gone

The requested resource is no longer available, and will not become available again. This can happen when resources expire for example.

412 Precondition Failed

The resource's current version does not match the version provided.

415 Unsupported Media Type

The request is in a format not supported by the requested resource for the requested method.

428 Precondition Required

The resource requires a version, but no version was supplied in the request.

500 Internal Server Error

The server encountered an unexpected condition that prevented it from fulfilling the request.

501 Not Implemented

The resource does not support the functionality required to fulfill the request.

503 Service Unavailable

The requested resource was temporarily unavailable. The service may have been disabled, for example.

6. Formatting Conventions

Most examples in the documentation are created in GNU/Linux or Mac OS X operating environments. If distinctions are necessary between operating environments, examples are labeled with the operating environment name in parentheses. To avoid repetition file system directory names are often given only in UNIX format as in /path/to/server, even if the text applies to C:\path\to\server as well.

Absolute path names usually begin with the placeholder /path/to/. This path might translate to /opt/, C:\Program Files\, or somewhere else on your system.

Command-line, terminal sessions are formatted as follows:

$ echo $JAVA_HOME
/path/to/jdk

Command output is sometimes formatted for narrower, more readable output even though formatting parameters are not shown in the command.

Program listings are formatted as follows:

class Test {
    public static void main(String [] args)  {
        System.out.println("This is a program listing.");
    }
}

7. Accessing Documentation Online

ForgeRock publishes comprehensive documentation online:

  • The ForgeRock Knowledge Base offers a large and increasing number of up-to-date, practical articles that help you deploy and manage ForgeRock software.

    While many articles are visible to community members, ForgeRock customers have access to much more, including advanced information for customers using ForgeRock software in a mission-critical capacity.

  • ForgeRock product documentation, such as this document, aims to be technically accurate and complete with respect to the software documented. It is visible to everyone and covers all product features and examples of how to use them.

8. Using the ForgeRock.org Site

The ForgeRock.org site has links to source code for ForgeRock open source software, as well as links to the ForgeRock forums and technical blogs.

If you are a ForgeRock customer, raise a support ticket instead of using the forums. ForgeRock support professionals will get in touch to help you.

9. Getting Support and Contacting ForgeRock

ForgeRock provides support services, professional services, training through ForgeRock University, and partner services to assist you in setting up and maintaining your deployments. For a general overview of these services, see https://www.forgerock.com.

ForgeRock has staff members around the globe who support our international customers and partners. For details, visit https://www.forgerock.com, or send an email to ForgeRock at info@forgerock.com.

Required Configuration


The configuration of IG is split into the following parts:

  • AdminHttpApplication: the entry point for administrative requests

  • GatewayHttpApplication: the entry point for gateway requests

Name

AdminHttpApplication — initialize IG configuration

Description

The AdminHttpApplication serves requests on the administrative route, such as the creation of routes and the collection of monitoring information. The administrative route and its subroutes are reserved for administration endpoints.

The configuration is loaded from a JSON-encoded configuration file, expected by default at $HOME/.openig/config/admin.json. If you don't provide an admin.json, IG provides a file with the following defaults:

  • The base of the administrative route is /openig. The product version and build information for a running instance of IG are at the /openig/api/info endpoint.

  • IG runs in production mode.

The AdminHttpApplication creates the following objects by default:

  • A CaptureDecorator that you can use to capture requests and response messages. The default CaptureDecorator is named capture. For details, see CaptureDecorator(5).

  • A TimerDecorator that you can use to record time spent within filters and handlers. The default TimerDecorator is named timer. For details, see TimerDecorator(5).

Important

The AdminHttpApplication does not declare default configurations for objects such as the ClientHandler, ReverseProxyHandler, or ForgeRockClientHandler. If you add an admin.json file to your configuration, consider whether you need to add these objects to its heap.

The AdminHttpApplication creates a default TemporaryStorage object named TemporaryStorage. To change the default values, add a TemporaryStorage object named TemporaryStorage and use non-default values.

Usage

{
   "heap": [ configuration object, ... ],
   "mode": enumeration,
   "prefix" : configuration expression<string>,
   "properties": JSON object,
   "temporaryStorage": TemporaryStorage reference
}

Properties

mode: operating mode, optional

Set the IG mode to development or production. The value is not case-sensitive.

  • Development mode (mutable mode)

    Use development mode to evaluate or demo IG, or to develop configurations on a single instance. This mode is not suitable for production.

    In development mode, by default all endpoints are open and accessible. You can create, edit, and deploy routes through IG Studio, and manage routes through Common REST, without authentication or authorization.

    To protect specific endpoints in development mode, configure an ApiProtectionFilter in admin.json and add it to the IG configuration.

  • Production mode (immutable mode)

    After you have developed your configuration, switch to production mode to test the configuration, to run the software in pre-production or production, or to run multiple instances of the software with the same configuration.

    In production mode, the /routes endpoint is not exposed or accessible. Studio is effectively disabled, and you cannot manage, list, or even read routes through Common REST.

    By default, other endpoints, such as /monitoring, /share, and api/info are exposed to the loopback address only. To change the default protection for specific endpoints, configure an ApiProtectionFilter in admin.json and add it to the IG configuration.

If mode is not set, the IG mode can be set by the configuration token ig.run.mode. For more information, see Configuration Tokens(5).

Default: production

"heap": array of configuration objects, optional

The heap object configuration, described in Heap Objects(5).

You can omit an empty array.

"prefix": configuration expression<string>, optional

The base of the route for administration requests. This route and its subroutes are reserved for administration endpoints.

Default: openig

"properties": JSON object, optional

Configuration parameters declared as property variables for use in the configuration. See also Properties(5).

Default: none

"temporaryStorage": TemporaryStorage reference, optional

Cache content during processing based on this TemporaryStorage configuration.

Define the TemporaryStorage in one of the following ways:

  • An inline TemporaryStorage configuration object.

  • The name of a TemporaryStorage object defined in the heap.

  • A configuration expression that evaluates to the name of a TemporaryStorage object defined in the heap.

Default: use the heap object named TemporaryStorage.

See also reference and TemporaryStorage(5).

Example

The following example shows an admin.json file configured to override the default ApiProtectionFilter that protects the reserved administrative route. This example is used in Procedure 11.5, "To Set Up IG As an UMA Resource Server" in the Gateway Guide.

{
  "heap": [
    {
      "name": "ClientHandler",
      "type": "ClientHandler"
    },
    {
      "name": "ApiProtectionFilter",
      "type": "ScriptableFilter",
      "config": {
        "type": "application/x-groovy",
        "file": "CorsFilter.groovy"
      }
    }
  ],
  "prefix": "openig"
}

Name

GatewayHttpApplication — configure IG

Description

The GatewayHttpApplication is the entry point for all incoming gateway requests. It is responsible for initializing a heap of objects, described in Heap Objects(5), and providing the main Handler that receives all the incoming requests. The configuration is loaded from a JSON-encoded configuration file, expected by default at $HOME/.openig/config/config.json.

If you provide a config.json, the IG configuration is loaded from that file. If there is no file, the default configuration is loaded.

The endpoint is defined by the presence and content of config.json, as follows:

  • When config.json is not provided, the routes endpoint includes the name of the main router in the default configuration, _router.

  • When config.json is provided with an unnamed main router, the routes endpoint includes the main router name router-handler.

  • When config.json is provided with a named main router, the routes endpoint includes the provided name or the transformed, URL-friendly name.

Important

Studio deploys and undeploys routes through a main router named _router, which is the name of the main router in the default configuration. If you use a custom config.json, make sure that it contains a main router named _router.

The GatewayHttpApplication creates the following objects by default:

  • A BaseUriDecorator that you can use to override the scheme, host, and port of the existing request URI. The default BaseUriDecorator is named baseURI. For details, see BaseUriDecorator(5).

  • A CaptureDecorator that you can use to capture requests and response messages. The default CaptureDecorator is named capture. For details, see CaptureDecorator(5).

  • A TimerDecorator that you can use to record time spent within Filters and Handlers. The default TimerDecorator is named timer. For details, see TimerDecorator(5).

The GatewayHttpApplication declares default configurations in the heap for the following objects:

  • A client handler named ClientHandler for communicating with with third-party services. For details, see ClientHandler(5).

  • A proxy client handler named ReverseProxyHandler for communicating with protected applications. For details, see ReverseProxyHandler(5).

  • A client handler named ForgeRockClientHandler for sending a ForgeRock Common Audit transaction ID when communicating with protected applications. The default object wraps a ClientHandler.

The GatewayHttpApplication looks for an object named Session in the heap:

  • If it finds an object named Session, it uses it as the default session producer.

    For example, to store session information in an HTTP cookie on the user-agent, you can define a JwtSession named Session in config.json. Stored session information must fit the constraints for storage in a JWT and in a cookie, as described in JwtSession(5).

  • If it doesn't find an object named Session, the session is based on the Servlet HttpSession that is handled by the container where IG runs.

    Session information is stored in an IG cookie called by default IG_SESSIONID.

Usage

{
  "handler": Handler reference or inline Handler declaration,
  "heap": [ configuration object, ... ],
  "properties": JSON object,
  "temporaryStorage": TemporaryStorage reference
}

Properties

"handler": Handler reference, required

Dispatch all requests to this handler.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

See also Handlers.

"heap": array of configuration objects, optional

The heap object configuration, described in Heap Objects(5).

You can omit an empty array. If you only have one object in the heap, you can inline it as the handler value.

"properties": JSON object, optional

Configuration parameters declared as property variables for use in the configuration. See also Properties(5).

Default: none

"temporaryStorage": TemporaryStorage reference, optional

Cache content during processing based on this TemporaryStorage configuration.

Provide either the name of a TemporaryStorage object defined in the heap, or an inline TemporaryStorage configuration object.

Default: use the heap object named TemporaryStorage. Otherwise use an internally-created TemporaryStorage object that is named TemporaryStorage and that uses default settings for a TemporaryStorage object.

See also TemporaryStorage(5).


Name

Heap Objects — configure and initialize objects, with dependency injection

Description

A heaplet creates and initializes an object that is stored in a heap. A heaplet can retrieve objects it depends on from the heap.

A heap is a collection of associated objects created and initialized by heaplet objects. All configurable objects in IG are heap objects.

The heap configuration is included as an object in the configuration of the GatewayHttpApplication and AdminHttpApplication. For information, see AdminHttpApplication(5) and GatewayHttpApplication(5).

Usage

[
    {
        "name": string,
        "type": string,
        "config": {
            object-specific configuration
        }
    },
    ...
]

Properties

"name": string, required except for inline objects

The unique name to give the heap object in the heap. This name is used to resolve the heap object, for example, when another heap object names a heap object dependency.

"type": string, required

The class name of the object to be created. To determine the type name, see the object's documentation in this reference.

"config": object, required

The configuration that is specific to the heap object being created.

If all the fields are optional and the configuration uses only default settings, you can omit the config field instead of including an empty config object as the field value.

Automatically Created Objects

IG automatically creates required configuration objects. To override an automatically created object, create a heap object with the same name. The following objects are automatically created:

"ApiProtectionFilter"

The default filter used to protect administrative APIs on reserved routes. Reserved routes are described in Section 2, "Reserved Routes".

To override this filter, declare a different filter with the same name in admin.json. For more information, see AdminHttpApplication(5).

Default: a filter that allows access only from the loopback address.

"MetricsProtectionFilter"

The default filter used to protect the monitoring endpoints.

To override this filter, declare a different filter with the same name in admin.json. For more information, see AdminHttpApplication(5).

Default: the monitoring endpoints are not protected.

"TemporaryStorage"

The default object to use for managing temporary buffers.

Default: a TemporaryStorage object named "TemporaryStorage" with the default configuration is added to the top-level heap.

Routes can use this object without explicitly defining it. To override this object, create a TemporaryStorage heap object with the same name.

See also TemporaryStorage(5).


Name

Configuration Settings — configure objects

Description

Filters, handlers, and other objects whose configuration settings are defined by strings, integers, or booleans, can alternatively be defined by expressions that match the expected type.

Expressions can retrieve the values for configuration settings from system properties or environment variables. When IG starts up or when a route is reloaded, the expressions are evaluated. If you change the value of a system property or environment variable and then restart IG or reload the route, the configuration settings are updated with the new values.

If a configuration setting is required and the expression returns null, an error occurs when IG starts up or when the route is reloaded. If the configuration setting is optional, there is no error.

In the following example, "numberOfRequests" is defined by an expression that recovers the system property "requestsPerSecond" and transforms it into an integer. Similarly, "monitor" is defined by an expression that recovers the environment variable "ENABLE_MONITORING" and transforms it into a boolean:

{
  "handler": {
    "type": "Chain",
    "config": {
      "filters": [
        {
          "type": "ThrottlingFilter",
          "config": {
            "requestGroupingPolicy": "${request.headers['UserId'][0]}",
            "rate": {
              "numberOfRequests": "${integer(system['requestsPerSecond'])}",
              "duration": "10 seconds"
            }
          }
        }
      ],
      "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  },
  "monitor" : "${boolean(env['ENABLE_MONITORING'])}",
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/throttle-simple')}"
}

If "requestsPerSecond"=150 and "ENABLE_MONITORING"=false, after the expressions are evaluated IG views the example route as follows:

{
  "handler": {
    "type": "Chain",
    "config": {
      "filters": [
        {
          "type": "ThrottlingFilter",
          "config": {
            "requestGroupingPolicy": "${request.headers['UserId'][0]}",
            "rate": {
              "numberOfRequests": 150,
              "duration": "10 seconds"
            }
          }
        }
      ],
      "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  },
  "monitor" : false,
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/throttle-simple')}"
}

For information about expressions, see Expressions(5).

Handlers


Handler objects process an HTTP request by producing an associated response.

Name

Chain — dispatch the request to ordered list of filters and finally to a handler

Description

Dispatches a request to an ordered list of filters, and then finally to a handler.

Unlike ChainOfFilters, Chain finishes by dispatching the request to a handler. For more information, see ChainOfFilters(5).

Usage

{
     "name": string,
     "type": "Chain",
     "config": {
         "filters": [ Filter reference, ... ],
         "handler": Handler reference
     }
}

Properties

"filters": array of filter references, required

An array of names of filter objects defined in the heap, and inline filter configuration objects.

The chain dispatches the request to these filters in the order they appear in the array.

See also Filters.

"handler": Handler reference, required

Either the name of a handler object defined in the heap, or an inline handler configuration object.

The chain dispatches to this handler after the request has traversed all of the specified filters.

See also Handlers.

Example

{
     "name": "LoginChain",
     "type": "Chain",
     "config": {
         "filters": [ "LoginFilter" ],
         "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
     }
}

Name

ClientHandler — relay requests to third-party services

Description

Submits requests to third-party services.

To relay requests to proxied applications servers instead of third-party services, consider using a ReverseProxyHandler(5).

Usage

{
     "name": string,
     "type": "ClientHandler",
     "config": {
         "connections": number,
         "disableReuseConnection": boolean,
         "hostnameVerifier": configuration expression<enumeration>,
         "soTimeout": duration string,
         "connectionTimeout": duration string,
         "numberOfWorkers": number,
         "proxy": Server reference,
         "sslCipherSuites": array,
         "sslContextAlgorithm": string,
         "sslEnabledProtocols": array,
         "systemProxy": boolean,
         "keyManager": KeyManager reference(s),
         "trustManager": TrustManager reference(s),
         "temporaryStorage": string,
         "asyncBehavior": "enumeration",
         "retries": object
     }
}

Properties

"connections": number, optional

The maximum number of connections in the HTTP client connection pool.

Default: 64

"connectionTimeout": duration string, optional

Amount of time to wait to establish a connection, expressed as a duration

Default: 10 seconds

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"disableReuseConnection": boolean, optional

Whether to disable connection reuse.

Default: false

"hostnameVerifier": configuration expression<enumeration>, optional

Way to handle hostname verification for outgoing SSL connections. Use one of the following values:

  • ALLOW_ALL: Allow a certificate issued by a trusted CA for any hostname or domain to be accepted for a connection to any domain.

    Caution

    This setting allows a certificate issued for one company to be accepted as a valid certificate for another company.

    To prevent the compromise of TLS connections, use this setting in development mode only. In production, use STRICT.

  • STRICT: Match the hostname either as the value of the the first CN, or any of the subject-alt names.

    A wildcard can occur in the CN, and in any of the subject-alt names. Wildcards match one domain level, so *.example.com matches www.example.com but not some.host.example.com.

Default: STRICT

"numberOfWorkers": number, optional

The number of worker threads dedicated to processing outgoing requests.

Increasing the value of this attribute can be useful in deployments where a high number of simultaneous connections remain open, waiting for protected applications to respond.

Default: One thread per CPU available to the JVM.

"proxy": Server reference, optional

A proxy server to which requests can be submitted. Use this property to relay requests to other parts of the network, for example, to relay requests from an internal network to the internet.

If both proxy and systemProxy are defined, proxy takes precedence.

uri: configuration expression<uri string>, required

URI of a server to use as a proxy for outgoing requests.

The result of the expression must be a string that represents a valid URI, but is not a real java.net.URI object.

username: string, required if the proxy requires authentication

Username to access the proxy server.

password: string, required if the proxy requires authentication

Password to access the proxy server.

In the following example, the ClientHandler passes outgoing requests to the proxy server, which requires authentication:

"handler": {
  "type": "ClientHandler",
  "config": {
     "proxy" : {
        "uri": "http://proxy.example.com:3128",
        "username": "proxy-user",
        "password": "proxy-password"
     }
  }
}
"keyManager": KeyManager reference(s), optional

The key manager(s) that handle(s) this client's keys and certificates.

The value of this field can be a single reference, or an array of references.

Provide either the name(s) of KeyManager object(s) defined in the heap, or specify the configuration object(s) inline.

You can specify either a single KeyManager, as in "keyManager": "MyKeyManager", or an array of KeyManagers, as in "keyManager": [ "FirstKeyManager", "SecondKeyManager" ].

If you do not configure a key manager, then the client cannot present a certificate, and so cannot play the client role in mutual authentication.

See also KeyManager(5).

"soTimeout": duration string, optional

Socket timeout, after which stalled connections are destroyed, expressed as a duration

Tip

If SocketTimeoutException errors occur in the logs when you try to download large files, consider increasing soTimeout.

Default: 10 seconds

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"sslCipherSuites": array of strings, optional

Array of cipher suite names, used to restrict the cipher suites allowed when negotiating transport layer security for an HTTPS connection.

For details about the available cipher suite names, see the documentation for the Java virtual machine (JVM) used by the container where you run IG. For Oracle Java, see the list of JSSE Cipher Suite Names.

Default: Allow any cipher suite supported by the JVM.

"sslContextAlgorithm": string, optional

The SSLContext algorithm name, as listed in the table of SSLContext Algorithms for the Java Virtual Machine used by the container where IG runs.

Default: TLS

"sslEnabledProtocols": array of strings, optional

Array of protocol names, used to restrict the protocols allowed when negotiating transport layer security for an HTTPS connection.

For details about the available protocol names, see the documentation for the Java virtual machine (JVM) used by the container where you run IG. For Oracle Java, see the list of Additional JSSE Standard Names.

Default: Allow any protocol supported by the JVM.

"systemProxy": boolean, optional

Submit outgoing requests to a system-defined proxy, set by the following system properties or their HTTPS equivalents:

  • http.proxyHost, the host name of the proxy server.

  • http.proxyPort, the port number of the proxy server. The default is 80.

  • http.nonProxyHosts, a list of hosts that should be reached directly, bypassing the proxy.

This property can't be used with a proxy that requires a username and password. Use the property proxy instead.

If both proxy and systemProxy are defined, proxy takes precedence.

For more information, see Java Networking and Proxies.

Default: False.

"trustManager": TrustManager reference(s), optional

The trust managers that handle(s) peers' public key certificates.

The value of this field can be a single reference, or an array of references.

Provide either the name(s) of TrustManager object(s) defined in the heap, or specify the configuration object(s) inline.

You can specify either a single TrustManager, as in "trustManager": "MyTrustManager", or an array of KeyManagers, as in "trustManager": [ "FirstTrustManager", "SecondTrustManager" ].

If you do not configure a trust manager, then the client uses only the default Java truststore. The default Java truststore depends on the Java environment. For example, $JAVA_HOME/lib/security/cacerts.

See also TrustManager(5).

"temporaryStorage": string, optional

Specifies the heap object to use for temporary buffer storage.

Default: The temporary storage object named TemporaryStorage, declared in the top-level heap.

"asyncBehavior": enumeration, optional

Specifies how the HTTP client behaves for asynchronous responses. Set the value to streaming or non_streaming (not case-sensitive):

  • streaming: Responses are processed as soon as all headers are received. The entity content is downloaded in a background thread.

    Streaming mode reduces latency and is mandatory for Server-Sent Events (SSE) and the support of very large files (bigger than 2 GB). If thread starvation occurs, consider increasing numberOfWorkers, the number of worker threads dedicated to processing outgoing requests.

  • non_streaming: Responses are processed when the entity content is entirely available.

    Non-streaming mode does not support SSE or very large files. However, it has higher latency, and does not cause thread starvation.

Default: non_streaming

"retries": object, optional

Enable and configure retry for requests.

When a runtime error occurs while executing the request to the remote server, IG schedules a new execution of the request after the specified delay, until the allowed number of retries is reached or the execution succeeds.

"enabled": boolean, optional

Enable retries.

Default: true

"executor": ScheduledExecutorService reference, optional

The ScheduledExecutorService to use for scheduling delayed execution of the request.

Default: ScheduledExecutorService.

See also ScheduledExecutorService(5).

"count": number, optional

The maximum number of retries to perform.

After this threshold is passed and if the request is still not successful, then the ClientHandler will propagate the failure.

Default: 5 retries.

"delay": duration, optional

The delay to wait before retrying the request.

After a failure to send the request, if the number of retries is below the threshold, a new attempt is scheduled with the executor service after this delay.

Default: 10 seconds.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

The following example configures the handler to retry the request only once, after a 1-minute delay:

{
  "retries": {
    "count": 1,
    "delay": "1 minute"
  }
}

The following example configures the handler to retry the request at most 20 times, every second:

{
  "retries": {
    "count": 20,
    "delay": "1 second"
  }
}

The following example configures the handler to retry the request 5 times, every 10 seconds (default values), with a dedicated executor:

{
  "retries": {
    "executor": {
      "type": "ScheduledExecutorService",
      "config": {
        "corePoolSize": 20
      }
    }
  }
}

Example

The following object configures a ClientHandler named Client:

{
  "name": "Client",
  "type": "ClientHandler",
  "config": {
        "hostnameVerifier": "STRICT",
        "sslContextAlgorithm": "TLSv1.2",
        "keyManager": {
            "type": "KeyManager",
            "config": {
                "keystore": {
                    "type": "KeyStore",
                    "config": {
                        "url": "file://${env['HOME']}/keystore.jks",
                        "password": "${system['keypass']}"
                    }
                },
                "password": "${system['keypass']}"
            }
        },
        "trustManager": {
            "type": "TrustManager",
            "config": {
                "keystore": {
                    "type": "KeyStore",
                    "config": {
                        "url": "file://${env['HOME']}/truststore.jks",
                        "password": "${system['trustpass']}"
                    }
                }
            }
        }
  }
}

Name

DesKeyGenHandler — generate a DES key

Description

Generates a DES key for use with AM as described in Procedure 4.1, "To Create a DES Shared Key In IG" in the Gateway Guide.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "DesKeyGenHandler"
}

Name

DispatchHandler — dispatch to a handler if a condition is met

Description

When a request is handled, the first condition in the list of conditions is evaluated. If the condition expression yields true, the request is dispatched to the associated handler with no further processing. Otherwise, the next condition in the list is evaluated.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "DispatchHandler",
    "config": {
        "bindings": [
            {
                "condition": runtime expression<boolean>,
                "handler": Handler reference,
                "baseURI": runtime expression<uri string>,
            }, ...
        ]
    }
}

Properties

"bindings": array of objects, required

A list of bindings of conditions and associated handlers to dispatch to.

"condition": runtime expression<boolean>, optional

If the expression evaluates true, the request is dispatched to the associated handler. If no condition is specified, the request is dispatched to the associated handler unconditionally.

Default: No condition is specified.

"handler": Handler reference, required

Dispatch to this handler if the associated condition yields true.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

See also Handlers.

"baseURI": runtime expression<uri string>, optional

A base URI that overrides the existing request URI. Only scheme, host, and port are used in the supplied URI.

The result of the expression must be a string that represents a valid URI, but is not a real java.net.URI object. For example, it would be incorrect to use ${request.uri}, which is not a String but a MutableUri.

In the following example, the binding condition looks up the hostname of the request. If it finds a match, the value is used for the baseURI. Otherwise, the default value is used:

{
  "properties": {
    "uris": {
      "app1.example.com": {
        "baseURI": "http://backend1:8080/"
      },
      "app2.example.com": {
        "baseURI": "http://backend2:8080/"
      },
      "default": {
        "baseURI": "http://backend3:8080/"
      }
    }
  },
  "handler": {
    "type": "DispatchHandler",
    "config": {
      "bindings": [
        {
          "condition": "${not empty uris[contexts.router.originalUri.host]}",
          "baseURI": "${uris[contexts.router.originalUri.host].baseURI}",
          "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
        },
        {
          "baseURI": "${uris['default'].baseURI}",
          "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
        }
      ]
    }
  }
}

Default: No change to the base URI

Example

The following sample is from a SAML 2.0 federation configuration:

  • If the incoming URI matches /saml, then IG dispatches to a SamlFederationHandler without further processing.

  • If the previous condition is not met, and the user name is not set in the session context, then IG dispatches the request to a SPInitiatedSSORedirectHandler.

    In this case, the user has not authenticated with the SAML 2.0 Identity Provider, so the SPInitiatedSSORedirectHandler initiates SAML 2.0 SSO from the Service Provider, which is IG.

  • If neither of the previous conditions are met, the request goes through a LoginChain handler.

{
    "name": "DispatchHandler",
    "type": "DispatchHandler",
    "config": {
        "bindings": [
            {
                "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/saml')}",
                "handler": "SamlFederationHandler"
            },
            {
                "condition": "${empty session.username}",
                "handler": "SPInitiatedSSORedirectHandler",
                "baseURI": "http://www.example.com:8081"
            },
            {
                "handler": "LoginChain",
                "baseURI": "http://www.example.com:8081"
            }
        ]
    }
}


Name

ReverseProxyHandler — relay requests to proxied applications, return 502 on failure

Description

Relays requests to proxied applications. When IG fails to connect to the proxied application, changes a runtime exception into a 502 Bad Gateway response.

To relay requests to third-party services instead of a proxied application, consider using a ClientHandler(5).

Usage

{
     "name": string,
     "type": "ReverseProxyHandler",
     "config": {
         "connections": number,
         "disableReuseConnection": boolean,
         "hostnameVerifier": configuration expression<enumeration>,
         "soTimeout": duration string,
         "connectionTimeout": duration string,
         "numberOfWorkers": number,
         "proxy": Server reference,
         "sslCipherSuites": array,
         "sslContextAlgorithm": string,
         "sslEnabledProtocols": array,
         "systemProxy": boolean,
         "keyManager": KeyManager reference(s),
         "trustManager": TrustManager reference(s),
         "temporaryStorage": string,
         "asyncBehavior": "enumeration",
         "retries": object
     }
}

Properties

"connections": number, optional

The maximum number of connections in the HTTP client connection pool.

Default: 64

"connectionTimeout": duration string, optional

Amount of time to wait to establish a connection, expressed as a duration

Default: 10 seconds

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"disableReuseConnection": boolean, optional

Whether to disable connection reuse.

Default: false

"hostnameVerifier": configuration expression<enumeration>, optional

Way to handle hostname verification for outgoing SSL connections. Use one of the following values:

  • ALLOW_ALL: Allow a certificate issued by a trusted CA for any hostname or domain to be accepted for a connection to any domain.

    Caution

    This setting allows a certificate issued for one company to be accepted as a valid certificate for another company.

    To prevent the compromise of TLS connections, use this setting in development mode only. In production, use STRICT.

  • STRICT: Match the hostname either as the value of the the first CN, or any of the subject-alt names.

    A wildcard can occur in the CN, and in any of the subject-alt names. Wildcards match one domain level, so *.example.com matches www.example.com but not some.host.example.com.

Default: STRICT

"numberOfWorkers": number, optional

The number of worker threads dedicated to processing outgoing requests.

Increasing the value of this attribute can be useful in deployments where a high number of simultaneous connections remain open, waiting for protected applications to respond.

Default: One thread per CPU available to the JVM.

"proxy": Server reference, optional

A proxy server to which requests can be submitted. Use this property to relay requests to other parts of the network, for example, to submit requests from an internal network to the internet.

If both proxy and systemProxy are defined, proxy takes precedence.

url: configuration expression<uri string>, required

URI of a server to use as a proxy for outgoing requests.

The result of the expression must be a string that represents a valid URI, but is not a real java.net.URI object.

username: string, required if the proxy requires authentication

Username to access the proxy server.

password: string, required if the proxy requires authentication

Password to access the proxy server.

In the following example, the ReverseProxyHandler passes outgoing requests to the proxy server, which requires authentication:

"handler": {
  "type": "ReverseProxyHandler",
  "config": {
     "proxy" : {
        "uri": "http://proxy.example.com:3128",
        "username": "proxy-user",
        "password": "proxy-password"
     }
  }
}
"keyManager": KeyManager reference(s), optional

The key manager(s) that handle(s) this client's keys and certificates.

The value of this field can be a single reference, or an array of references.

Provide either the name(s) of KeyManager object(s) defined in the heap, or specify the configuration object(s) inline.

You can specify either a single KeyManager, as in "keyManager": "MyKeyManager", or an array of KeyManagers, as in "keyManager": [ "FirstKeyManager", "SecondKeyManager" ].

If you do not configure a key manager, then the client cannot present a certificate, and so cannot play the client role in mutual authentication.

See also KeyManager(5).

"soTimeout": duration string, optional

Socket timeout, after which stalled connections are destroyed, expressed as a duration

Default: 10 seconds

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"sslCipherSuites": array of strings, optional

Array of cipher suite names, used to restrict the cipher suites allowed when negotiating transport layer security for an HTTPS connection.

For details about the available cipher suite names, see the documentation for the Java virtual machine (JVM) used by the container where you run IG. For Oracle Java, see the list of JSSE Cipher Suite Names.

Default: Allow any cipher suite supported by the JVM.

"sslContextAlgorithm": string, optional

The SSLContext algorithm name, as listed in the table of SSLContext Algorithms for the Java Virtual Machine used by the container where IG runs.

Default: TLS

"sslEnabledProtocols": array of strings, optional

Array of protocol names, used to restrict the protocols allowed when negotiating transport layer security for an HTTPS connection.

For details about the available protocol names, see the documentation for the Java virtual machine (JVM) used by the container where you run IG. For Oracle Java, see the list of Additional JSSE Standard Names.

Default: Allow any protocol supported by the JVM.

"systemProxy": boolean, optional

Submit outgoing requests to a system-defined proxy, set by the following system properties or their HTTPS equivalents:

  • http.proxyHost, the host name of the proxy server.

  • http.proxyPort, the port number of the proxy server. The default is 80.

  • http.nonProxyHosts, a list of hosts that should be reached directly, bypassing the proxy.

This property can't be used with a proxy that requires a username and password. Use the property proxy instead.

If both proxy and systemProxy are defined, proxy takes precedence.

For more information, see Java Networking and Proxies.

Default: False.

"trustManager": TrustManager reference(s), optional

The trust managers that handle(s) peers' public key certificates.

The value of this field can be a single reference, or an array of references.

Provide either the name(s) of TrustManager object(s) defined in the heap, or specify the configuration object(s) inline.

You can specify either a single TrustManager, as in "trustManager": "MyTrustManager", or an array of KeyManagers, as in "trustManager": [ "FirstTrustManager", "SecondTrustManager" ].

If you do not configure a trust manager, then the client uses only the default Java truststore. The default Java truststore depends on the Java environment. For example, $JAVA_HOME/lib/security/cacerts.

See also TrustManager(5).

"temporaryStorage": string, optional

Specifies the heap object to use for temporary buffer storage.

Default: The temporary storage object named TemporaryStorage, declared in the top-level heap.

"asyncBehavior": enumeration, optional

Specifies how the HTTP client behaves for asynchronous responses. Set the value to streaming or non_streaming (not case-sensitive):

  • streaming: Responses are processed as soon as all headers are received. The entity content is downloaded in a background thread.

    Streaming mode reduces latency and is mandatory for Server-Sent Events (SSE) and the support of very large files (bigger than 2 GB). If thread starvation occurs, consider increasing numberOfWorkers, the number of worker threads dedicated to processing outgoing requests.

  • non_streaming: Responses are processed when the entity content is entirely available.

    Non-streaming mode does not support SSE or very large files. However, it has higher latency, and does not cause thread starvation.

Tip

If timeout errors occur in the logs, consider setting soTimeout to limit the timeout, and setting asyncBehavior to non_streaming.

Default: non_streaming

"retries": object, optional

Enable and configure retry for requests.

When a runtime error occurs while executing the request to the remote server, IG schedules a new execution of the request after the specified delay, until the allowed number of retries is reached or the execution succeeds.

"enabled": boolean, optional

Enable retries.

Default: true

"executor": ScheduledExecutorService reference, optional

The ScheduledExecutorService to use for scheduling delayed execution of the request.

Default: ScheduledExecutorService.

See also ScheduledExecutorService(5).

"count": number, optional

The maximum number of retries to perform.

After this threshold is passed and if the request is still not successful, then the ReverseProxyHandler will return a 502 Bad Gateway response.

Default: 5 retries.

"delay": duration, optional

The delay to wait before retrying the request.

After a failure to send the request, if the number of retries is below the threshold, a new attempt is scheduled with the executor service after this delay.

Default: 10 seconds.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

The following example configures the handler to retry the request only once, after a 1-minute delay:

{
  "retries": {
    "count": 1,
    "delay": "1 minute"
  }
}

The following example configures the handler to retry the request at most 20 times, every second:

{
  "retries": {
    "count": 20,
    "delay": "1 second"
  }
}

The following example configures the handler to retry the request 5 times, every 10 seconds (default values), with a dedicated executor:

{
  "retries": {
    "executor": {
      "type": "ScheduledExecutorService",
      "config": {
        "corePoolSize": 20
      }
    }
  }
}

Name

Route — JSON configuration files to handle requests and their context

Description

Routes are configuration files that you add to IG to manage requests. They are flat files in JSON format. You can add routes in the following ways:

Every route must call a handler to process requests and produce responses to requests.

When a route has a condition, it can handle only requests that meet the condition. When a route has no condition, it can handle any request.

Routes inherit settings from their parent configuration. This means that you can configure global objects in the config.json heap, for example, and then reference the objects by name in any other IG configuration.

For examples of route configurations see Chapter 12, "Configuring Routers and Routes" in the Gateway Guide.

Usage

{
    "handler": Handler reference or inline Handler declaration,
    "heap": [ configuration object, ... ],
    "condition": runtime expression<boolean>,
    "monitor": boolean expression or object,
    "name": string,
    "session": Session reference
}

Properties

"handler": Handler reference, required

For this route, dispatch the request to this handler.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

See also Handlers.

"heap": array of configuration objects, optional

Heap object configuration for objects local to this route.

Objects referenced but not defined here are inherited from the parent.

You can omit an empty array. If you only have one object in the heap, you can inline it as the handler value.

See also Heap Objects(5).

"condition": runtime expression<boolean>, optional

If the expression evaluates to true, the request is dispatched to the route. If no condition is specified, the route accepts any request.

An external request can never match a condition that uses the reserved administrative route. Therefore, routes that use these conditions are effectively ignored. For example, if /openig is the administrative route, a route with the following condition would effectively be ignored: ${matches(request.uri.path, '^/openig/my/path')}.

Default: No condition is specified.

For some example route conditions, see Section 12.2.2, "Setting Route Conditions" in the Gateway Guide.

See also Section 2, "Reserved Routes" and Expressions(5).

"monitor": boolean expression OR object, optional

This property lets you specify whether to maintain statistics about the route, and optionally to specify the percentiles in the distribution for which to record response times.

Use a boolean or boolean expression to activate monitoring with the default percentiles configuration.

When the boolean expression resolves to true, statistics for the route are exposed at an IG Common REST endpoint. For more information, see Section 16.3, "IG Route Monitoring Endpoint (Deprecated)" in the Gateway Guide.

For information about API descriptors for monitoring endpoints, see Section 1.10, "Understanding IG APIs With API Descriptors" in the Gateway Guide. For information about Common REST, see Section 5, "About ForgeRock Common REST".

Default: false, with percentiles 0.999, 0.9999, and 0.99999.

{
    "monitor": {
        "enabled": boolean expression OR boolean,
        "percentiles": array of numbers
    }
}

The configuration object fields include the following:

"enabled": boolean expression, required

Whether to maintain statistics about the route, as described above.

"percentiles": array of decimal numbers, optional

The percentiles in the distribution for which to maintain response time statistics. If you specify percentiles, only those percentiles are used. The default percentile settings no longer apply.

Each value in the array is a decimal representation of a percentage. For example, 0.999 represents 99.9%.

The statistic maintained for a percentile is the response time in milliseconds after which percentile of responses were sent. For example, the statistic for 0.999 corresponds to the response time in milliseconds after which 99.9% of responses were sent. The statistic for 0.5 corresponds to the response time in milliseconds after which half of all responses were sent.

Default: [ 0.999, 0.9999, 0.99999 ]

The following examples show the formats of the monitor attribute:

{
    "monitor": true
}

{
   "monitor": {
       "enabled": false
   }
}

{
   "monitor": {
       "enabled": "${true}",
       "percentiles": [ 0.1, 0.75, 0.99, 0.999 ]
   }
}

"name": string, optional

Name for the route.

The Router uses the name property to order the routes in the configuration. If the route does not have a name property, the Router uses the route ID.

The route ID is managed as follows:

  • When you add a route manually to the routes folder, the route ID is the value of the _id field. If there is no _id field, the route ID is the filename of the added route.

  • When you add a route through the Common REST endpoint, the route ID is the value of the mandatory _id field.

  • When you add a route through Studio, you can edit the default route ID.

Caution

The filename of a route cannot be default.json, and the route's name property and route ID cannot be default.

Default: route ID

"session": Session reference, optional

Session storage implementation used by this route, such as a JwtSession as described in JwtSession(5).

Provide either the name of a session storage object defined in the heap, or an inline session storage configuration object.

Default: do not change the session storage implementation for session.


Name

Router — Route request processing to separate routes

Description

A router is a handler that performs the following tasks:

  • Defines the routes directory and loads routes into the configuration.

  • Depending on the scanning interval, periodically scans the routes directory and updates the IG configuration when routes are added, removed, or changed. The router updates the IG configuration without needing to restart IG or access the route.

  • Manages an internal list of routes, where routes are ordered lexicographically by route name. If a route is not named, then the route ID is used instead. For more information, see Route(5).

  • Routes requests to the first route in the internal list of routes, whose condition is satisfied.

    Because the list of routes is ordered lexicographically by route name, name your routes with this in mind:

    • If a request satisfies the condition of more than one route, it is routed to the first route in the list whose condition is met.

    • Even if the request matches a later route in the list, it might never reach that route.

    If a request does not satisfy the condition of any route, it is routed to the default handler if one is configured.

The router does not have to know about specific routes in advance - you can configure the router first and then add routes while IG is running.

Important

Studio deploys and undeploys routes through a main router named _router, which is the name of the main router in the default configuration. If you use a custom config.json, make sure that it contains a main router named _router.

Usage

{
    "name": "Router",
    "type": "Router",
    "config": {
        "defaultHandler": Handler reference,
        "directory": expression,
        "scanInterval": duration string or integer
    }
}

An alternative value for type is RouterHandler.

Properties

"defaultHandler": Handler reference, optional

Handler to use when a request does not satisfy the condition of any route.

Provide either the name of a handler object defined in the heap, or an inline handler configuration object.

Default: If no default route is set either here or in the route configurations, IG aborts the request with an internal error.

See also Handlers.

"directory": expression, optional

Base directory from which to load configuration files for routes.

Default: default base directory for route configuration files. For details, see Section 2.3, "Installing IG" in the Gateway Guide.

The following example changes the file system location to look for routes:

{
    "type": "Router",
    "config": {
        "directory": "/path/to/safe/routes",
    }
}

Important

If you define a new router in the default base directory, then you must set the directory property to a different directory from the default base directory in order to avoid a circular reference to the new router.

See also Expressions(5).

"scanInterval": duration string or integer, optional

Time interval at which IG scans the specified directory for changes to routes. When a route is added, removed, or changed, the router updates the IG configuration without needing to restart IG or access the route.

When an integer is used for the scanInterval, the time unit is seconds.

To load routes at startup only, and prevent changes to the configuration if the routes are changed, set the scan interval to disabled.

Default: 10 seconds

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.


Name

SamlFederationHandler — play the role of SAML 2.0 Service Provider

Description

A handler to play the role of SAML 2.0 Service Provider (SP).

Note

This handler does not support filtering. Specifically, do not use this as the handler for a Chain, which can include filters.

More generally, do not use this handler when its use depends on something in the response. The response can be handled independently of IG, and can be null when control returns to IG. For example, do not use this handler in a SequenceHandler where the postcondition depends on the response.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "SamlFederationHandler",
    "config": {
        "assertionMapping": object,
        "redirectURI": string,
        "assertionConsumerEndpoint": string,
        "authnContext": string,
        "authnContextDelimiter": string,
        "logoutURI": string,
        "sessionIndexMapping": string,
        "singleLogoutEndpoint": string,
        "singleLogoutEndpointSoap": string,
        "SPinitiatedSLOEndpoint": string,
        "SPinitiatedSSOEndpoint": string,
        "subjectMapping": string
    }
}

Properties

"assertionMapping": object, required

The assertionMapping defines how to transform attributes from the incoming assertion to attribute value pairs in IG.

Each entry in the assertionMapping object has the form localName: incomingName, where:

  • localName is the name of the attribute set in the session

  • incomingName is the name of the attribute set in the incoming assertion

The following example is an assertionMapping object:

{
    "username": "mail",
    "password": "mailPassword"
}

If the incoming assertion contains the statement:

mail = george@example.com
mailPassword = costanza

Then the following values are set in the session:

username = george@example.com
password = costanza

For this to work, edit the <Attribute name="attributeMap"> element in the SP extended metadata file, $HOME/.openig/SAML/sp-extended.xml, so that it matches the assertion mapping configured in the SAML 2.0 Identity Provider (IDP) metadata.

Because the dot character (.) serves as a query separator in expressions, do not use dot characters in the localName.

To prevent different handlers from overwriting each others' data, use unique localName settings when protecting multiple service providers.

"redirectURI": string, required

Set this to the page that the filter used to HTTP POST a login form recognizes as the login page for the protected application.

This is how IG and the Federation component work together to provide SSO. When IG detects the login page of the protected application, it redirects to the Federation component. Once the Federation handler validates the SAML exchanges with the IDP, and sets the required session attributes, it redirects back to the login page of the protected application. This allows the filter used to HTTP POST a login form to finish the job by creating a login form to post to the application based on the credentials retrieved from the session attributes.

"assertionConsumerEndpoint": string, optional

Default: fedletapplication (same as the Fedlet)

If you modify this attribute you must change the metadata to match.

"authnContext": string, optional

Name of the session field to hold the value of the authentication context. Because the dot character (.) serves as a query separator in expressions, do not use dot characters in the field name.

Use this setting when protecting multiple service providers, as the different configurations must not map their data into the same fields of session. Otherwise different handlers can overwrite each others' data.

As an example, if you set "authnContext": "myAuthnContext", then IG sets session.myAuthnContext to the authentication context specified in the assertion. When the authentication context is password over protected transport, then this results in the session containing "myAuthnContext": "urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:ac:classes:PasswordProtectedTransport".

Default: map to session.authnContext

"authnContextDelimiter": string, optional

The authentication context delimiter used when there are multiple authentication contexts in the assertion.

Default: |

"logoutURI": string, optional

Set this to the URI to visit after the user is logged out of the protected application.

You only need to set this if the application uses the single logout feature of the Identity Provider.

"sessionIndexMapping": string, optional

Name of the session field to hold the value of the session index. Because the dot character (.) serves as a query separator in expressions, do not use dot characters in the field name.

Use this setting when protecting multiple service providers, as the different configurations must not map their data into the same fields of session. Otherwise different handlers can overwrite each others' data.

As an example, if you set "sessionIndexMapping": "mySessionIndex", then IG sets session.mySessionIndex to the session index specified in the assertion. This results in the session containing something like "mySessionIndex": "s24ccbbffe2bfd761c32d42e1b7a9f60ea618f9801".

Default: map to session.sessionIndex

"singleLogoutEndpoint": string, optional

Default: fedletSLORedirect (same as the Fedlet)

If you modify this attribute you must change the metadata to match.

"singleLogoutEndpointSoap": string, optional

Default: fedletSloSoap (same as the Fedlet)

If you modify this attribute you must change the metadata to match.

"SPinitiatedSLOEndpoint": string, optional

Default: SPInitiatedSLO

If you modify this attribute you must change the metadata to match.

"SPinitiatedSSOEndpoint": string, optional

Default: SPInitiatedSSO

If you modify this attribute you must change the metadata to match.

"subjectMapping": string, optional

Name of the session field to hold the value of the subject name. Because the dot character (.) serves as a query separator in expressions, do not use dot characters in the field name.

Use this setting when protecting multiple service providers, as the different configurations must not map their data into the same fields of session. Otherwise different handlers can overwrite each others' data.

As an example, if you set "subjectMapping": "mySubjectName", then IG sets session.mySubjectName to the subject name specified in the assertion. If the subject name is an opaque identifier, then this results in the session containing something like "mySubjectName": "vtOk+APj1s9Rr4yCka6V9pGUuzuL".

Default: map to session.subjectName

Example

The following sample configuration is corresponds to a scenario where IG receives a SAML 2.0 assertion from the IDP, and then logs the user in to the protected application using the username and password from the assertion:

{
    "name": "SamlFederationHandler",
    "type": "SamlFederationHandler",
    "config": {
        "assertionMapping": {
            "username": "mail",
            "password": "mailPassword"
        },
        "redirectURI": "/login",
        "logoutURI": "/logout"
    }
}

Name

ScriptableHandler — handle a request by using a script

Description

Handles a request by using a script.

The script must return either a Promise<Response, NeverThrowsException> or a Response.

Important

When you are writing scripts or Java extensions, never use a Promise blocking method, such as get(), getOrThrow(), or getOrThrowUninterruptibly(), to obtain the response.

A promise represents the result of an asynchronous operation. Therefore, using a blocking method to wait for the result can cause deadlocks and/or race issues.

Objects

The script has access to the following global objects:

Any parameters passed as args

You can use the configuration to pass parameters to the script by specifying an args object.

The args object is a map whose values can be scalars, arrays, and objects. The args object can reference objects defined in the heap by using expressions, for example, "${heap['ObjectName']}".

The values for script arguments can be defined as configuration expressions, and evaluated at configuration time.

Script arguments cannot refer to context and request, but context and request variables can be accessed directly within scripts.

Take care when naming keys in the args object. If you reuse the name of another global object, cause the script to fail and IG to return a response with HTTP status code 500 Internal Server Error.

All heap objects

The heap object configuration, described in Heap Objects(5).

openig

An implicit object that provides access to the environment when expressions are evaluated.

attributes

The attributes object provides access to a context map of arbitrary attributes, which is a mechanism for transferring transient state between components when processing a single request.

Use session for maintaining state between successive requests from the same logical client.

context

The processing context.

This context is the leaf of a chain of contexts. It provides access to other Context types, such as SessionContext, AttributesContext, and ClientContext, through the context.asContext(ContextClass.class) method.

contexts

a map<string, context> object. For information, see Contexts(5).

request

The HTTP request.

globals

This object is a Map that holds variables that persist across successive invocations.

http

An embedded client for making outbound HTTP requests, which is an org.forgerock.http.Client.

If a "clientHandler" is set in the configuration, then that Handler is used. Otherwise, the default ClientHandler configuration is used.

For details, see Handlers.

ldap

The ldap object provides an embedded LDAP client.

Use this client to perform outbound LDAP requests, such as LDAP authentication.

logger

The logger object provides access to a unique SLF4J logger instance for scripts, where the logger instance is named with the script name.

For information about logging for scripts, see Section 18.4.3, "Logging for Scripts" in the Gateway Guide.

session

The session object provides access to the session context, which is a mechanism for maintaining state when processing a successive requests from the same logical client or end-user.

Use attributes for transferring transient state between components when processing a single request.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "ScriptableHandler",
    "config": {
        "type": string,
        "file": expression,                    // Use either "file"
        "source": string or array of strings   // or "source", but not both
        "args": object,
        "clientHandler": Handler reference
    }
}

Properties

"type": string, required

The Internet media type (formerly MIME type) of the script, "application/x-groovy" for Groovy

"file": expression

Path to the file containing the script; mutually exclusive with "source"

Relative paths in the file field are relative to the base location for scripts. The base location depends on the configuration. For details, see Section 2.3, "Installing IG" in the Gateway Guide.

The base location for Groovy scripts is on the classpath when the scripts are executed. If some Groovy scripts are not in the default package, but instead have their own package names, they belong in the directory corresponding to their package name. For example, a script in package com.example.groovy belongs under openig-base/scripts/groovy/com/example/groovy/.

"source": string or array of strings, required if "file" is not used

The script as a string or array of strings; mutually exclusive with "file".

The following example shows the source of a script as an array of strings:

"source" : [
    "Response response = new Response(Status.OK)",
    "response.entity = 'foo'",
    "return response"
]

"args": map, optional

Parameters passed from the configuration to the script.

  • The following example configures arguments as a map whose values can are scalars, arrays, and objects:

    {
      "args": {
        "title": "Coffee time",
        "status": 418,
        "reason": [
          "Not Acceptable",
          "I'm a teapot",
          "Acceptable"
        ],
        "names": {
          "1": "koffie",
          "2": "kafe",
          "3": "cafe",
          "4": "kafo"
        }
      }
    }

    A script can access the args parameters in the same way as other global objects. The following example sets the response status to I'm a teapot:

    response.status = Status.valueOf(418, reason[1])

    For information about the 418 status code see RFC 7168, Section 2.3.3 418 I'm a Teapot.

  • The following example configures arguments as strings and numbers for a ScriptableThrottlingPolicy:

    "args" : {
      "status" : "gold",
      "rate" : 6,
      "duration": "10 seconds"
    }

    The following lines set the throttling rate to 6 requests each 10 seconds when the response status is gold:

    "if (attributes.rate.status == status) {",
    "  return new ThrottlingRate(rate, duration)"
  • The following example configures arguments that reference a SampleFilter defined in the heap:

    {
      "heap": [
        {
          "name": "SampleFilter",
          "type": "SampleFilter",
          "config": {
            "name": "X-Greeting",
            "value": "Hello world"
          }
        }
      ]
    }

    The following line uses an expression in the args parameter to pass SampleFilter to the script:

    {
      "args": {
        "filter": "${heap['SampleFilter']}"
      }
    }

    The script can then reference SampleFilter as filter.

"clientHandler", ClientHandler reference, optional

A Handler for making outbound HTTP requests.

Default: Use the default ClientHandler.

For details, see Handlers.


Name

SequenceHandler — process request through sequence of handlers

Description

Processes a request through a sequence of handlers. This allows multi-request processing such as retrieving a form, extracting form content (for example, nonce) and submitting in a subsequent request. Each handler in the bindings is dispatched to in order; the binding postcondition determines if the sequence should continue.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "SequenceHandler",
    "config": {
        "bindings": [
            {
                "handler": Handler reference,
                "postcondition": runtime expression<boolean>
            }
        ]
    }
}

Properties

"bindings": array of objects, required

A list of bindings of handler and postcondition to determine that sequence continues.

"handler": Handler reference, required

Dispatch to this handler.

Either the name of the handler heap object to dispatch to, or an inline Handler configuration object.

See also Handlers.

"postcondition": runtime expression<boolean>, optional

If the expression evaluates to true, the sequence continues. If a condition is not specified, the sequence continues unconditionally.

Default: No condition is specified.

See also Expressions(5).


Name

StaticResponseHandler — create static response to a request

Description

Creates a static response to a request.

Usage

{
     "name": string,
     "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
     "config": {
         "status": number,
         "reason": string,
         "version": string,
         "headers": {
             name: [ runtime expression<string>, ... ], ...
         },
         "entity": runtime expression<string>
     }
}

Properties

"status": number, required

The response status code (for example, 200).

"reason": string, optional

The response status reason (for example, "OK").

"version": string, optional

Protocol version. Default: "HTTP/1.1".

"headers": array of objects, optional

The name specifies the header name. Its value is an array of runtime expressions to evaluate as header values.

"entity": runtime expression<string>, optional

The message entity to include in the request.

If present, it must conform to the Content-Type header and set the content length header automatically.

See also Expressions(5).

Example

{
     "name": "ErrorHandler",
     "type":"StaticResponseHandler",
     "config": {
        "status": 500,
        "reason": "Error",
        "entity": "<html>
                   <h2>Epic #FAIL</h2>
                   </html>",
        "headers": {
          "content-type": [
            "text/html"
          ]
        }
     }
}

Filters


Filter objects intercept requests and responses during processing.

Name

AssignmentFilter — assign values to a target if a condition is met

Description

Verifies that a specified condition is met. If the condition is met or if no condition is specified, the value is assigned to the target. Values can be assigned before the request is handled and after the response is handled.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "AssignmentFilter",
    "config": {
        "onRequest": [
            {
                "condition": runtime expression<boolean>,
                "target": lvalue-expression,
                "value": runtime expression
            }, ...
        ],
        "onResponse": [
            {
                "condition": runtime expression<boolean>,
                "target": lvalue-expression,
                "value": runtime expression
            }, ...
        ]
    }
}

Properties

"onRequest": array of objects, optional

Defines a list of assignment bindings to evaluate before the request is handled.

"onResponse": array of objects, optional

Defines a list of assignment bindings to evaluate after the response is handled.

"condition": runtime expression<boolean>, optional

If the expression evaluates true, the value is assigned to the target. If no condition is specified, the value is assigned to the target unconditionally.

Default: No condition is specified.

See also Expressions(5).

"target": lvalue-expression, required

Expression that yields the target object whose value is to be set.

See also Expressions(5).

"value": runtime expression, optional

The value to be set in the target. The value can be a string, information from the context, or even a whole map of information.

See also Expressions(5).

Example

This is an example of how to capture credentials and store them in the IG session during a login request. Notice that the credentials are captured on the request but are not marked as valid until the response returns a positive 302. The credentials could then be used to log a user in to a different application:

{
    "name": "PortalLoginCaptureFilter",
    "type": "AssignmentFilter",
    "config": {
        "onRequest": [
            {
                "target": "${session.authUsername}",
                "value": "${request.form['username'][0]}",
            },
            {
                "target": "${session.authPassword}",
                "value": "${request.form['password'][0]}",
            },
            {
                "comment": "Authentication has not yet been confirmed.",
                "target": "${session.authConfirmed}",
                "value": "${false}",
            }
        ],
        "onResponse": [
            {
                "condition": "${response.status.code == 302}",
                "target": "${session.authConfirmed}",
                "value": "${true}",
            }
        ]
    }
}

Name

CapturedUserPasswordFilter — retrieve an AM password, decrypt it, and expose it in the context

Description

This filter makes an AM password available to IG in the following steps:

  • Checks for the presence of the SessionInfoContext context, at ${contexts.amSession}.

    • If the context is not present, or if sunIdentityUserPassword is null, the CapturedUserPasswordFilter collects session info and properties from AM.

      When sunIdentityUserPassword is included in the AM session properties whitelist, the password is included in the collected information.

    • If the context is present and sunIdentityUserPassword is not null, the CapturedUserPasswordFilter uses that value for the password.

  • The CapturedUserPasswordFilter decrypts the password and stores it in the CapturedUserPasswordContext, at ${contexts.capturedPassword}.

Usage

{
  "name": string,
   "type": "CapturedUserPasswordFilter",
   "config": {
     "amService": AmService reference,
     "key": configuration expression<string>,
     "keyType": configuration expression<string>,
     "ssoToken": runtime expression<string>
   }
}

Properties

"amService": AmService reference, required

The AmService heap object to use for url, amHandler, and version.

This filter is compatible with AM version 5.5 or higher. If version is not set, the default version is AM 5 and an error is thrown.

See also, AmService(5).

"key": configuration expression<string>, required

Base64 encoded key value to decrypt the AM password.

"keyType": configuration expression<enumeration>, required

Algorithm to decrypt the AM password. Use one of the following values:

  • DES for DES/ECB/NoPadding

  • AES AES for JWT-based AES_128_CBC_HMAC_SHA_256 encryption, available from AM 6.

    For more information, see AES_128_CBC_HMAC_SHA_256 in the IETF JSON Web Algorithms.

Default: DES

"ssoToken": runtime expression<string>, required

Location of the AM SSO token.

Default: ${request.cookies['AmService-ssoTokenHeader'][0].value}, where AmService-ssoTokenHeader is the name of the header or cookie where the AmService expects to find SSO tokens.

Examples

The following example route is used to get login credentials from AM in Chapter 4, "Getting Login Credentials From AM" in the Gateway Guide.

{
  "heap": [{
    "name": "AmService-1",
    "type": "AmService",
    "config": {
      "url": "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam/",
      "version": "6.0"
    }
  },
    {
      "name": "CapturedUserPasswordFilter",
      "type": "CapturedUserPasswordFilter",
      "config": {
        "ssoToken": "${contexts.ssoToken.value}",
        "key": "DESKEY",
        "amService": "AmService-1"
      }
    }
  ],
  "name": "04-replay",
  "handler": {
    "type": "Chain",
    "config": {
      "filters": [{
        "type": "SingleSignOnFilter",
        "config": {
          "amService": "AmService-1"
        }
      },
        {
          "type": "PasswordReplayFilter",
          "config": {
            "loginPage": "${true}",
            "credentials": "CapturedUserPasswordFilter",
            "request": {
              "method": "POST",
              "uri": "http://app.example.com:8081/login",
              "form": {
                "username": [
                  "${contexts.ssoToken.info.uid}"
                ],
                "password": [
                  "${contexts.capturedPassword.value}"
                ]
              }
            }
          }
        }
      ],
      "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  },
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/replay')}"
}

Name

ConditionalFilter — dispatch a request to a delegate filter if a condition is met

Description

Verifies that a specified condition is met. If the condition is met, the request is dispatched to a delegate Filter. Otherwise, the delegate Filter is skipped.

Use ConditionalFilter to easily use or skip a Filter depending on whether a condition is met. To easily use or skip a set of Filters, use a ChainOfFilters as the delegate Filter and define a set of Filters. For information, see ChainOfFilters(5).

Usage

{
    "type": "ConditionalFilter",
    "config": {
        "condition": runtime expression<boolean>,
        "delegate" : filter reference
   }
}

Properties

"condition": runtime expression<boolean>, required

If the expression evaluates to true, the request is dispatched to the delegate Filter. Otherwise the delegate Filter is skipped.

See also Expressions.

"delegate": filter reference, required

Filter to treat the request if the condition expression evaluates as true.

Provide an inline Filter configuration object, or the name of a Filter object defined in the heap.

See also Filters.

Example

The following example tests whether a request finishes with .js or .jpg:

{
  "type": "Chain",
  "config": {
    "filters": [{
      "type": "ConditionalFilter",
      "config": {
        "condition": "${not matches ((request.uri.path, ‘.js$’) or (request.uri.path, ‘.jpg$’))}",
        "delegate": "mySingleSignOnFilter"
      }
    }],
    "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
  }
}

If the request is to access a .js file or .jpg file, it skips the delegate SingleSignOnFilter filter declared in the heap, and passes straight to the ReverseProxyHandler.

If the request is to access another type of resource, it must pass through the delegate SingleSignOnFilter for authentication with AM before it can pass to the ReverseProxyHandler.


Name

ConditionEnforcementFilter — continue the chain of execution if a condition is met

Description

Verifies that a specified condition is met. If the condition is met, the request continues to be executed. Otherwise, the request is referred to a failure handler, or IG returns 403 Forbidden and the request is stopped.

Usage

{
    "type": "ConditionEnforcementFilter",
    "config": {
        "condition": runtime expression<boolean>,
        "failureHandler": handler reference
    }
}

Properties

"condition": runtime expression<boolean>, required

If the expression evaluates to true, the request continues to be executed.

See also Expressions.

"failureHandler": handler reference, optional

Handler to treat the request if the condition expression evaluates as false.

Provide an inline handler configuration object, or the name of a handler object that is defined in the heap.

See also Handlers.

Default: HTTP 403 Forbidden, the request stops being executed.

Example

The following example tests whether a request contains a session username. If it does, the request continues to be executed. Otherwise, the request is dispatched to the ConditionFailedHandler failure handler.

{
    "name": "UsernameEnforcementFilter",
    "type": "ConditionEnforcementFilter",
    "config": {
        "condition": "${not empty (session.username)}",
        "failureHandler": "ConditionFailedHandler"
    }
}

Name

ChainOfFilters — dispatch the request to ordered list of filters

Description

Dispatches a request to an ordered list of filters. Use this filter to assemble a list of filters into a single filter that you can then use in different places in the configuration.

A ChainOfFilters can be used as a filter inside a chain.

Unlike Chain, ChainOfFilters does not finish by dispatching the request to a handler. For more information, see Chain(5).

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "ChainOfFilters",
    "config": {
        "filters": [ Filter reference, ... ]
    }
}

Properties

"filters": array of filter references, required

An array of names of filter objects defined in the heap, and inline filter configuration objects.

The chain dispatches the request to these filters in the order they appear in the array.

See also Filters.

Example

{
    "name": "MyChainOfFilters",
    "type": "ChainOfFilters",
    "config": {
        "filters": [ "Filter1", "Filter2" ]
   }
}

Name

CookieFilter — manage, suppress, relay cookies

Description

Manages, suppresses, and relays cookies as follows:

  • Manage, to store cookies from the protected application in the IG session, and include them in later requests.

    For requests with a Cookie header, managed cookies are removed so that protected applications don't see them.

    For responses with a Set-Cookie header, managed cookies are removed and then added in a Cookie header to the next request that goes through that filter.

    Manage is the default action, and a common choice to manage cookies originating from the protected application.

  • Suppress, to remove cookies from the request and response. Use this option to hide domain cookies, such as iPlanetDirectoryPro, that are used by IG but are not usually used by protected applications.

  • Relay, to transmit cookies freely from the user agent to the remote server, and vice versa.

If a cookie does not appear in one of the three action parameters, then the default action is performed, controlled by setting the defaultAction parameter. If unspecified, the default action is to manage all cookies. In the event a cookie appears in more than one configuration parameter, then it will be selected in the order of precedence: managed, suppressed, relayed.

Usage

{
     "name": string,
     "type": "CookieFilter",
     "config": {
         "managed": [ string, ... ],
         "suppressed": [ string, ... ],
         "relayed": [ string, ... ],
         "defaultAction": string
     }
}

Properties

"managed": array of strings, optional

A list of the names of cookies to be managed.

"suppressed": array of strings, optional

A list of the names of cookies to be suppressed.

"relayed": array of strings, optional

A list of the names of cookies to be relayed.

"defaultAction": enumeration, optional

Action to perform for cookies that do not match an action set. Set to "MANAGE", "RELAY", or "SUPPRESS". Default: "MANAGE".


Name

CrossDomainSingleSignOnFilter — allow SSO with an AM instance deployed on a different cookie domain

Description

When IG and AM are running in the same domain, the SingleSignOnFilter can be used for SSO. When IG and AM are running in different domains, AM cookies are not visible to IG because of the same-origin policy. The CrossDomainSingleSignOnFilter provides a mechanism to push tokens issued by AM to IG running in a different domain.

When this filter processes a request, it injects the CDSSO token, the session user ID, and the full claims set into the CdSsoContext(5). Should an error occur during authentication then the error details are captured in a CdSsoFailureContext(5).

For an example of how to configure CDSSO in AM and IG, and information about the flow of data between AM, IG, and a protected application, see Section 5.2, "About CDSSO Using the CrossDomainSingleSignOnFilter" in the Gateway Guide. A J2EE agent must be configured in AM.

Usage

{
  "name": string,
  "type": "CrossDomainSingleSignOnFilter",
    "config": {
      "amService": AmService reference,
      "authCookie": object,
      "redirectEndpoint": runtime expression<uri>,
      "failureHandler": Handler reference
  }
}

Properties

"amService": AmService reference, required

The AmService heap object to use for the following properties:

  • url: URL of an AM service to use for session token validation and authentication.

  • realm: AM realm to use for authentication.

  • ssoTokenHeader: Name of the cookie that contains the session token created by AM.

  • amHandler: Handler to use when communicating with AM to validate the token in the incoming request.

See also, AmService(5).

"authCookie": object, optional

"name": string, optional

Name of the cookie containing the authentication token from AM.

Default: ig-token-cookie

"domain": string, optional

Domain to which the cookie applies.

Default: Domain of the original request.

"path": string, optional

Path protected by this authentication.

Default: /

"redirectEndpoint": runtime expression<uri>, required

The URI to the endpoint for CDSSO.

This URI must also be configured in AM exactly as it is configured here. For more information about configuring policy agents in AM, see Implementing Cross-Domain Single Sign-On in the Access Management Authentication and Single Sign-On Guide..

To make sure that the redirect is routed back to this filter, where the authentication can be validated, include the endpoint in the route condition in one of the following ways:

  • As a sub-path of the condition path.

    For example, use the following route condition with the following endpoint:

    "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/cdsso')}"

    "redirectEndpoint": "/home/cdsso/callback"

  • To match the route condition.

    For example, use the following route condition with the following endpoint:

    "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/cdsso')}"

    "redirectEndpoint": "/home/cdsso"

    Note

    With this route condition, all POST requests on the condition path are treated as AM CDSSO callbacks. Any POST requests that aren't the result of an AM CDSSO callback will fail.

  • As a specific path that is not related to the condition path.

    To make sure that the redirect is routed back to this filter, include the redirectEndpoint as a path in the filter condition.

    For example, use the following route condition with the following endpoint:

    "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/cdsso/redirect') || matches(request.uri.path, '^/ig/cdssoRedirectUri')}"

    "redirectEndpoint": "/ig/cdssoRedirectUri"

"failureHandler": Handler reference, optional

Failure handler to be invoked should an error occur during authentication.

Should an error occur during authentication, a CdSsoFailureContext(5) is populated with details of the error and any associated Throwable. This is available to the failure handler so that it can respond appropriately.

Be aware that the failure handler does not itself play a role in user authentication. It is only invoked if there is a problem that prevents user authentication from taking place.

A number of circumstances may cause the failure handler to be invoked, including:

  • The redirect endpoint is invalid.

  • The redirect endpoint is invoked without a valid CDSSO token.

  • The redirect endpoint is invoked inappropriately.

  • An error was reported by AM during authentication.

Should no failure handler be configured then the default failure handler is used.

See alsoHandlers.

Default: HTTP 200 Ok. The response entity contains details of the error.

Example

In the following example from Chapter 5, "Single Sign-On and Cross-Domain Single Sign-On" in the Gateway Guide, IG uses authentication from AM on a different domain to process a request:

        {
  "name": "cdsso",
  "baseURI": "http://app.example.com:8081",
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/cdsso')}",
  "monitor": false,
  "heap": [
    {
      "name": "AmService-1",
      "type": "AmService",
      "config": {
        "url": "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam",
        "realm": "/",
        "ssoTokenHeader": "iPlanetDirectoryPro",
        "agent": {
          "username": "J2EE",
          "password": "password"
        },
        "version": "6.0"
      }
    }
  ],
  "handler": {
    "type": "Chain",
    "config": {
      "filters": [
        {
          "name": "CrossDomainSingleSignOnFilter-1",
          "type": "CrossDomainSingleSignOnFilter",
          "config": {
            "redirectEndpoint": "/home/cdsso/redirect",
            "authCookie": {
              "path": "/home",
              "name": "ig-token-cookie"
            },
            "amService": "AmService-1"
          }
        }
      ],
      "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  }
}
      

Name

CryptoHeaderFilter — encrypt, decrypt headers

Description

Encrypts or decrypts headers in a request or response.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "CryptoHeaderFilter",
    "config": {
        "messageType": string,
        "operation": string,
        "key": expression,
        "algorithm": string,
        "charset": string,
        "keyType": string,
        "headers": [ string, ... ]
    }
}

Properties

"messageType": string, required

Indicates the type of message whose headers to encrypt or decrypt.

Must be one of: "REQUEST", "RESPONSE".

"operation": string, required

Indicates whether to encrypt or decrypt.

Must be one of: "ENCRYPT", "DECRYPT".

"key": expression, required

Base64 encoded key value.

See also Expressions(5).

"algorithm": string, optional

Algorithm used for encryption and decryption.

Default: AES/ECB/PKCS5Padding

"charset": string, optional

The name of the charset used for decrypting values, as described in Class Charset.

Default: UTF-8

"keyType": string, optional

Algorithm name for the secret key.

Default: AES

"headers": array of strings, optional

The names of header fields to encrypt or decrypt.

Default: Do not encrypt or decrypt any headers

Example

{
    "name": "DecryptReplayPasswordFilter",
    "type": "CryptoHeaderFilter",
    "config": {
        "messageType": "REQUEST",
        "operation": "DECRYPT",
        "algorithm": "DES/ECB/NoPadding",
        "keyType": "DES",
        "key": "oqdP3DJdE1Q=",
        "headers": [
            "replaypassword"
        ]
    }
}

Name

EntityExtractFilter — extract pattern from message entity

Description

Extracts regular expression patterns from a message entity. The extraction results are stored in a "target" object. For a given matched pattern, as described in Patterns(5), the value stored in the object is either the result of applying its associated pattern template (if specified) or the match result itself otherwise.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "EntityExtractFilter",
    "config": {
        "messageType": string,
        "charset": string,
        "target": lvalue-expression,
        "bindings": [
            {
                "key": string,
                "pattern": pattern,
                "template": pattern-template
            }, ...
        ]
    }
}

Properties

"messageType": string, required

The message type to extract patterns from.

Must be one of: REQUEST, RESPONSE.

"charset": string, optional

Overrides the character set encoding specified in message.

Default: the message encoding is used.

"target": lvalue-expression, required

Expression that yields the target object that contains the extraction results.

The bindings determine what type of object is stored in the target location.

The object stored in the target location is a Map<String, String>. You can then access its content with ${target.key} or ${target['key']}.

See also Expressions(5).

"key": string, required

Name of element in target object to contain an extraction result.

"pattern": pattern, required

The regular expression pattern to find in the entity.

See also Patterns(5).

"template": pattern-template, optional

The template to apply to the pattern and store in the named target element.

Default: store the match result itself.

See also Patterns(5).

Examples

Extracts a nonce from the response, which is typically a login page, and sets its value in the attributes context to be used by the downstream filter posting the login form. The nonce value would be accessed using the following expression: ${attributes.extract.wpLoginToken}.

The pattern finds all matches in the HTTP body of the form wpLogintoken value="abc". Setting the template to $1 assigns the value abc to attributes.extract.wpLoginToken:

{
    "name": "WikiNoncePageExtract",
    "type": "EntityExtractFilter",
    "config": {
        "messageType": "response",
        "target": "${attributes.extract}",
        "bindings": [
            {
                "key": "wpLoginToken",
                "pattern": "wpLoginToken\"\\s.*value=\"(.*)\"",
                "template": "$1"
            }
        ]
    }
}

The following example reads the response looking for the AM login page. When found, it sets isLoginPage = true to be used in a SwitchFilter to post the login credentials:

{
    "name": "FindLoginPage",
    "type": "EntityExtractFilter",
    "config": {
        "messageType": "response",
        "target": "${attributes.extract}",
        "bindings": [
            {
                "key": "isLoginPage",
                "pattern": "OpenAM\s\(Login\)",
                "template": "true"
            }
        ]
    }
}

Name

FileAttributesFilter — retrieve record from a file

Description

Retrieves and exposes a record from a delimiter-separated file. Lookup of the record is performed using a specified key, whose value is derived from an expression. The resulting record is exposed in an object whose location is specified by the target expression. If a matching record cannot be found, then the resulting object is empty.

The retrieval of the record is performed lazily; it does not occur until the first attempt to access a value in the target. This defers the overhead of file operations and text processing until a value is first required. This also means that the value expression is not evaluated until the object is first accessed.

Usage

{
     "name": string,
     "type": "FileAttributesFilter",
     "config": {
         "file": expression,
         "charset": string,
         "separator": string,
         "header": boolean,
         "fields": [ string, ... ],
         "target": lvalue-expression,
         "key": string,
         "value": runtime expression<string>
     }
}

For an example see Section 3.2, "Log in With Credentials From a File" in the Gateway Guide.

Properties

"file": expression, required

The file containing the record to be read.

See also Expressions(5).

"charset": string, optional

The character set in which the file is encoded.

Default: "UTF-8".

"separator": separator identifier string, optional

The separator character, which is one of the following:

COLON

Unix-style colon-separated values, with backslash as the escape character.

COMMA

Comma-separated values, with support for quoted literal strings.

TAB

Tab separated values, with support for quoted literal strings.

Default: COMMA

"header": boolean, optional

The setting to treat or not treat the first row of the file as a header row.

When the first row of the file is treated as a header row, the data in that row is disregarded and cannot be returned by a lookup operation.

Default: true.

"fields": array of strings, optional

A list of keys in the order they appear in a record.

If fields is not set, the keys are assigned automatically by the column numbers of the file.

"target": lvalue-expression, required

Expression that yields the target object to contain the record.

The target object is a Map<String, String>, where the fields are the keys. For example, if the target is ${attributes.file} and the record has a username field and a password field mentioned in the fields list, Then you can access the user name as ${attributes.file.username} and the password as ${attributes.file.password}.

See also Expressions(5).

"key": string, required

The key used for the lookup operation.

"value": runtime expression<string>, required

The value to be looked-up in the file.

See also Expressions(5).


Name

HeaderFilter — remove and add headers

Description

Removes headers from and adds headers to request and response messages. Headers are added to any existing headers in the message. To replace a header, remove the header and then add it again.

Usage

{
     "name": string,
     "type": "HeaderFilter",
     "config": {
         "messageType": enumeration,
         "remove": [ string, ... ],
         "add": {
            name: [ runtime expression<string>, ... ], ...
         }
     }
}

Properties

"messageType": enumeration, required

Indicates the type of message to filter headers for. Must be one of: "REQUEST", "RESPONSE".

"remove": array of strings, optional

The names of header fields to remove from the message.

"add": object, optional

Header fields to add to the message. The header name is specified by name. The header values are specified by an array of runtime expressions that evaluate to strings.

Examples

Replace the host header on the incoming request with the value myhost.com:

{
     "name": "ReplaceHostFilter",
     "type": "HeaderFilter",
     "config": {
         "messageType": "REQUEST",
         "remove": [ "host" ],
         "add": {
             "host": [ "myhost.com" ]
         }
     }
}

Add a Set-Cookie header in the response:

{
     "name": "SetCookieFilter",
     "type": "HeaderFilter",
     "config": {
         "messageType": "RESPONSE",
         "add": {
             "Set-Cookie": [ "mysession=12345" ]
         }
     }
}

Add headers custom1 and custom2 to the request:

{
     "name": "SetCustomHeaders",
     "type": "HeaderFilter",
     "config": {
         "messageType": "REQUEST",
         "add": {
             "custom1": [ "12345", "6789" ],
             "custom2": [ "abcd" ]
         }
     }
}

Add the value of session's policy enforcement token to the pef_sso_token header in the response:

{
    "type": "HeaderFilter",
    "config": {
        "messageType": "RESPONSE",
        "add": {
            "pef_sso_token": ["${session.pef_token}"]
        }
    }
}

Name

HttpBasicAuthFilter — perform HTTP Basic authentication

Description

Performs authentication through the HTTP Basic authentication scheme. For more information, see RFC 2617.

If challenged for authentication via a 401 Unauthorized status code by the server, this filter retries the request with credentials attached. After an HTTP authentication challenge is issued from the remote server, all subsequent requests to that remote server that pass through the filter include the user credentials.

If authentication fails (including the case where no credentials are yielded from expressions), then processing is diverted to the specified authentication failure handler.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "HttpBasicAuthFilter",
    "config": {
        "username": runtime expression<string>,
        "password": runtime expression<string>,
        "failureHandler": Handler reference,
        "cacheHeader": boolean
    }
}

Properties

"username": runtime expression<string>, required

The username to supply during authentication.

See also Expressions(5).

"password": runtime expression<string>, required

The password to supply during authentication.

See also Expressions(5).

"failureHandler": Handler reference, required

Dispatch to this Handler if authentication fails.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

See also Handlers.

"cacheHeader": boolean, optional

Whether or not to cache credentials in the session after the first successful authentication, and then replay those credentials for subsequent authentications in the same session.

With "cacheHeader": false, the filter generates the header for each request. This is useful, for example, when users change their passwords during a browser session.

Default: true

Example

{
    "name": "TomcatAuthenticator",
    "type": "HttpBasicAuthFilter",
    "config": {
        "username": "tomcat",
        "password": "tomcat",
        "failureHandler": "TomcatAuthFailureHandler",
        "cacheHeader": false
    }
}

Name

LocationHeaderFilter — rewrites Location headers

Description

For a response that generates a redirect to the proxied application, this filter rewrites the Location header on the response to redirect the user to IG.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "LocationHeaderFilter",
    "config": {
        "baseURI": runtime expression<uri string>
    }
}

An alternative value for type is RedirectFilter.

Properties

"baseURI": runtime expression<uri string>, optional

The base URI of the IG instance. This is used to rewrite the Location header on the response.

The result of the expression must be a string that represents a valid URI, but is not a real java.net.URI object. For example, it would be incorrect to use ${request.uri}, which is not a String but a MutableUri.

Default: Redirect to the original URI specified in the request.

See also Expressions(5).

Example

In the following example, IG listens on https://openig.example.com:443 and the application it protects listens on http://app.example.com:8081. The filter rewrites redirects that would normally take the user to locations under http://app.example.com:8081 to go instead to locations under https://openig.example.com:443.

{
     "name": "LocationRewriter",
     "type": "LocationHeaderFilter",
     "config": {
         "baseURI": "https://openig.example.com:443/"
      }
}

Name

OAuth2ClientFilter — authenticate an end user with OAuth 2.0 delegated authorization

Description

An OAuth2ClientFilter is a filter that authenticates an end user using OAuth 2.0 delegated authorization. The filter can act as an OpenID Connect relying party as well as an OAuth 2.0 client.

The client filter does not include information about identity providers, or information about static registration with identity providers. For information about an identity provider, see Issuer(5). For information about registration with an identity provider, see ClientRegistration(5).

In the case where all users share the same identity provider, you can configure the filter as a client of a single provider by referencing a single client registration name for the filter. You can also configure the filter to work with multiple providers, taking the user to a login handler page—often full of provider logos, and known as a Nascar page. The name comes from Nascar race cars, some of which are covered with sponsors' logos—to choose a provider.

What an OAuth2ClientFilter does depends on the incoming request URI. In the following list clientEndpoint represents the value of the clientEndpoint in the filter configuration:

clientEndpoint/login/?discovery=user-input&goto=url

Using the user-input value, discover and register dynamically with the end user's OpenID Provider or with the client registration endpoint as described in RFC 7591.

Upon successful registration, redirect the end user to the provider for authentication and authorization consent before redirecting the user-agent back to the callback client endpoint.

clientEndpoint/login?registration=registrationName&goto=url

Redirect the end user for authorization with the specified registration, which is the name of a ClientRegistration configuration as described in ClientRegistration(5).

The provider corresponding to the registration then authenticates the end user and obtains authorization consent before redirecting the user-agent back to the callback client endpoint.

Ultimately if the entire process is successful, the filter saves the authorization state in the context and redirects the user-agent to the specified URL.

clientEndpoint/logout?goto=url

Remove the authorization state for the end user and redirect to the specified URL.

If no goto URL is specified in the request, the defaultLogoutGoto is used.

clientEndpoint/callback

Handle the callback from the OAuth 2.0 authorization server that occurs as part of the authorization process.

If the callback is handled successfully, the filter saves the authorization state in the context at the specified target location and redirects to the URL during login.

Other request URIs

Restore authorization state in the specified target location and call the next filter or handler in the chain.

Usage

{
  "name": string,
  "type": "OAuth2ClientFilter",
  "config": {
    "clientEndpoint": runtime expression<uri sting>,
    "failureHandler": Handler reference,
    "discoveryHandler": Handler reference,
    "loginHandler": Handler reference,
    "registrations": [ ClientRegistration reference(s) ],
    "metadata": dynamic registration client metadata object,
    "cacheExpiration": duration string,
    "executor": executor,
    "target": expression,
    "defaultLoginGoto": runtime expression<uri string>,
    "defaultLogoutGoto": runtime expression<uri string>,
    "requireHttps": boolean,
    "requireLogin": boolean,
    "issuerRepository": Issuer repository reference
  }
}

Properties

"clientEndpoint": runtime expression<uri string>, required

The base URI for the filter. For example, if you set "clientEndpoint": "/openid", the service URIs for this filter on your IG server are /openid/login, /openid/logout, and /openid/callback. These endpoints are implicitly reserved. Attempts to access them directly can cause undefined errors.

The result of the expression must be a string that represents a valid URI, but is not a real java.net.URI object. For example, it would be incorrect to use ${request.uri}, which is not a String but a MutableUri.

See also Expressions(5).

"failureHandler": handler reference, required

Provide an inline handler configuration object, or the name of a handler object that is defined in the heap.

When the OAuth 2.0 Resource Server denies access to a resource, the failure handler can be invoked only if the error response contains a WWW-Authenticate header (meaning that there was a problem with the OAuth 2.0 exchange). All other responses are forwarded to the user-agent without invoking the failure handler.

If the value of the WWW-Authenticate header is invalid_token, the OAuth2ClientFilter tries to refresh the access token:

  • If the token is refreshed, the OAuth2ClientFilter tries again to access the protected resource.

  • If the token is not refreshed, or if the second attempt to access the protected resource fails, the OAuth2ClientFilter invokes the failure handler.

When the failure handler is invoked, the target in the context can be populated with information such as the exception, client registration, and error. The failure object in the target is a simple map, similar to the following example:

{
    "client_registration": "ClientRegistration name string",
    "error": {
        "realm": "optional string",
        "scope": [ "optional required scope string", ... ],
        "error": "optional string",
        "error_description": "optional string",
        "error_uri": "optional string"
    },
    "access_token": "string",
    "id_token": "string",
    "token_type": "Bearer",
    "expires_in": "number",
    "scope": [ "optional scope string", ... ],
    "client_endpoint": "URL string",
    "exception": exception
}

In the failure object, the following fields are not always present. Their presence depends on when the failure occurs:

  • "access_token"

  • "id_token"

  • "token_type"

  • "expires_in"

  • "scope"

  • "client_endpoint"

See also Handlers.

"discoveryHandler": Handler reference, optional

Invoke this HTTP client handler to communicate with the OpenID Provider for OpenID Connect Discovery.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

Usually set this to the name of a ClientHandler configured in the heap, or a chain that ends in a ClientHandler.

Default: IG uses the default ClientHandler.

See also Handlers, ClientHandler(5).

"loginHandler": Handler reference, required if there are zero or multiple client registrations, optional if there is one client registration

Use this Handler when the user must choose an identity provider. When registrations contains only one client registration, this Handler is optional but is displayed if specified.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

The route in "Example Configuration For Multiple Identity Providers" includes a login handler that allows the user to choose from two client registrations, openam and google. For an example of a login handler where no client registrations are defined, see Procedure 9.6, "Preparing IG for Discovery and Dynamic Registration" in the Gateway Guide.

See also Handlers.

"registrations": Array of ClientRegistration references or inline ClientRegistration declarations, optional

List of client registrations that authenticate IG to the identity providers. The list must contain all client registrations that are to be used by the client filter.

The value represents a static client registration with an identity provider as described in ClientRegistration(5).

"metadata": client metadata object, required for dynamic client registration and ignored otherwise

This object holds client metadata as described in OpenID Connect Dynamic Client Registration 1.0, and optionally a list of scopes. See that document for additional details and a full list of fields.

This object can also hold client metadata as described in RFC 7591, OAuth 2.0 Dynamic Client Registration Protocol. See that RFC for additional details.

The following partial list of metadata fields is not exhaustive, but includes metadata that is useful with AM as OpenID Provider:

"redirect_uris": array of URI strings, required

The array of redirection URIs to use when dynamically registering this client.

"client_name": string, optional

Name of the client to present to the end user.

"scope": space separated string, optional

Space separated string of scopes to request of the OpenID Provider.

This property is available for dynamic client registration with AM from version 5.5, and with identity providers that support RFC 7591, OAuth 2.0 Dynamic Client Registration Protocol.

"scopes": array of strings, optional

Array of scope strings to request of the OpenID Provider.

This property is available for dynamic client registration with AM 5.5 and earlier versions only.

"cacheExpiration": duration string, optional

Duration for which to cache user-info resources.

IG lazily fetches user info from the OpenID provider. In other words, IG only fetches the information when a downstream Filter or Handler uses the user info. Caching allows IG to avoid repeated calls to OpenID providers when reusing the information over a short period.

Default: 10 minutes

Set this to disabled or zero to disable caching. When caching is disabled, user info is still lazily fetched.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"executor": executor, optional

An executor service to schedule the execution of tasks, such as the eviction of entries in the OpenID Connect user information cache.

Default: ScheduledExecutorService

See also ScheduledExecutorService(5).

"target": expression, optional

An expression that yields the target object. Downstream filters and handlers can use data in the target to enrich the existing request or create a new request.

  • If the authorization process completes successfully, the OAuth2ClientFilter injects the authorization state data into the target.

    In the following example, a downstream StaticRequestFilter retrieves the username and password from the target to log the user in to the sample application.

    {
      "type": "StaticRequestFilter",
      "config": {
        "method": "POST",
        "uri": "http://app.example.com:8081/login",
        "form": {
          "username": [
            "${attributes.openid.user_info.sub}"
          ],
           "password": [
            "${attributes.openid.user_info.family_name}"
          ]
        }
      }
    }

    For information about setting up this example, see Section 9.7, "Adapting the Configuration to Authenticate Automatically to the Sample Application" in the Gateway Guide.

  • If the failure handler is invoked, the target can be populated with information such as the exception, client registration, and error, as described in "failureHandler" in this reference page.

Default: ${attributes.openid}

See also Expressions(5).

"defaultLoginGoto": runtime expression<uri string>, optional

After successful authentication and authorization, if the user accesses the clientEndpoint/login endpoint without providing a landing page URL in the goto parameter, the request is redirected to this URI.

The result of the expression must be a string that represents a valid URI, but is not a real java.net.URI object. For example, it would be incorrect to use ${request.uri}, which is not a String but a MutableUri.

Default: return an empty page.

See also Expressions(5).

"defaultLogoutGoto": runtime expression<uri string>, optional

If the user accesses the clientEndpoint/logout endpoint without providing a goto URL, the request is redirected to this URI.

The result of the expression must be a string that represents a valid URI, but is not a real java.net.URI object. For example, it would be incorrect to use ${request.uri}, which is not a String but a MutableUri.

Default: return an empty page.

See also Expressions(5).

"requireHttps": boolean, optional

Whether to require that requests use the HTTPS scheme.

Default: true.

"requireLogin": boolean, optional

Whether to require authentication for all incoming requests.

Default: true.

"issuerRepository": Issuer repository reference, optional

A repository of OAuth 2.0 issuers, built from discovered issuers and the IG configuration.

Provide the name of an IssuerRepository object defined in the heap.

Default: Look up an issuer repository named IssuerRepository in the heap. If none is explicitly defined, then a default one named IssuerRepository is created in the current route.

See also IssuerRepository(5).

Example Configuration For Multiple Identity Providers

The following example builds on the AM and IG configuration in Example 9.1, "Route for IG As a Relying Party" in the Gateway Guide.

The client registration for the AM provider is now declared in the heap. A second client registration defines Google as an alternative identity provider. The NascarPage helps the user to choose an identity provider.

When a request is made to /home/id_token/login, the OAuth2ClientFilter directs the user to the NascarPage to choose an identity provider, and then handles negotiation for authorization with the chosen provider.

If the authorization process completes successfully, the filter injects the authorization state data into attributes.openid. The ReverseProxyHandler then passes the request to the home page of the sample application.

If a request is made to /home/id_token/logout without specifying a goto URL, the request is redirected to www.forgerock.com by the defaultLogoutGoto property.

{
  "heap": [
    {
      "name": "openam",
      "type": "ClientRegistration",
      "config": {
        "clientId": "oidc_client",
        "clientSecret": "password",
        "issuer": {
          "name": "Issuer",
          "type": "Issuer",
          "config": {
            "wellKnownEndpoint": "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam/oauth2/.well-known/openid-configuration"
          }
        },
        "scopes": [
          "openid",
          "profile",
          "email"
        ],
        "tokenEndpointAuthMethod": "client_secret_basic"
      }
    },
    {
      "name": "google",
      "type": "ClientRegistration",
      "config": {
        "clientId": "myClientId",
        "clientSecret": "myClientSecret",
        "issuer": {
          "name": "accounts.google.com",
          "type": "Issuer",
          "config": {
            "wellKnownEndpoint": "https://accounts.google.com/.well-known/openid-configuration"
          }
        },
        "scopes": [
          "openid",
          "profile"
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "name": "NascarPage",
      "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
      "config": {
        "status": 200,
        "entity": "<html><body><p><a href='/home/id_token/login?registration=openam&goto=${urlEncodeQueryParameterNameOrValue('http://openig.example.com:8080/home/id_token')}'>AM Login</a></p><p><a href='/home/id_token/login?registration=google&goto=${urlEncodeQueryParameterNameOrValue('http://openig.example.com:8080/home/id_token')}'>Google Login</a></p></body></html>"
      }
    }
  ],
  "name": "07-openid-nascar",
  "handler": {
    "type": "Chain",
    "config": {
      "filters": [
        {
          "type": "OAuth2ClientFilter",
          "config": {
            "target" : "${attributes.openid}",
            "clientEndpoint": "/home/id_token",
            "loginHandler" : "NascarPage",
            "registrations": [ "openam", "google" ],
            "defaultLogoutGoto" : "http://www.forgerock.com",
            "requireHttps": false,
            "requireLogin": true,
            "failureHandler": {
              "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
              "config": {
                "comment": "Trivial failure handler for debugging only",
                "status": 500,
                "reason": "Error",
                "entity": "${attributes.openid}"
              }
            }
          }
        }
      ],
      "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  },
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/id_token')}"
}

Use the following hints to set up Google credentials for this example:

  1. Go to https://console.cloud.google.com/apis/credentials.

  2. Create credentials for an OAuth 2.0 client ID with the following options:

    • Application type: Web application

    • Authorized redirect URI: http://openig.example.com:8080/home/id_token/callback

  3. In the IG route, replace myClientId and myClientSecret with the returned credentials.

For information about configuring providers, see Issuer(5) and ClientRegistration(5).

Notice that this configuration is for development and testing purposes only, and is not secure ("requireHttps": false). Make sure you do require HTTPS in production environments.


Name

OAuth2ResourceServerFilter — validate a request containing an OAuth 2.0 access token

Description

This filter validates a request containing an OAuth 2.0 access token. The filter expects an OAuth 2.0 token from the HTTP Authorization header of the request, such as the following example header, where the OAuth 2.0 access token is 1fc0e143-f248-4e50-9c13-1d710360cec9:

Authorization: Bearer 1fc0e143-f248-4e50-9c13-1d710360cec9

The filter extracts the access token, validates it with the configured access token resolver, and stores the access token in the oauth2 context. For information, see OAuth2Context(5).

The following table summarizes the errors that can occur when IG tries to validate the access token:

Table 1. Errors During Access Token Validation
ErrorResponse from the filter to the user-agent
Combination of the filter configuration and access token result in an invalid request to the authorization server. HTTP 400 Bad Request
No access token in the request header HTTP 401 Unauthorized WWW-Authenticate: Bearer realm="IG"
Access token not valid, for example, because it has expired HTTP 401 Unauthorized
Scopes for the access token don't match the specified required scopes HTTP 403 Forbidden

Usage

{
  "name": string,
  "type": "OAuth2ResourceServerFilter",
  "config": {
    "accessTokenResolver": AccessTokenResolver reference,
    "cache": object,
    "executor": executor,
    "requireHttps": boolean,
    "realm": string,
    "scopes": [ runtime expression<string>, ... ]
  }
}

An alternative value for type is OAuth2RSFilter.

Properties

"accessTokenResolver": AccessTokenResolver reference, required

Resolves an access token against an authorization server.

Use OpenAmAccessTokenResolver, TokenIntrospectionAccessTokenResolver, or ScriptableAccessTokenResolver.

OpenAMAccessTokenResolver

Use the AM token info endpoint, /oauth2/tokeninfo, to resolve access tokens and retrieve information, such as scopes.

"accessTokenResolver": {
  "type": "OpenAmAccessTokenResolver",
  "config": {
    "amService": AmService reference,
    "providerHandler": Handler reference
  }
}

For an example route, see Section 8.4.1, "Validating Access Tokens Through the Token Info Endpoint" in the Gateway Guide.

"amService": AmService reference, required

The AmService heap object to use for the token info endpoint. The endpoint is extrapolated from the url property of the AmService.

See also, AmService(5).

"providerHandler": Handler reference, optional

Invoke this HTTP client handler to send token info requests.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

Tip

To facilitate auditing, configure this handler with a ForgeRockClientHandler, which sends a ForgeRock Common Audit transaction ID when it communicates with protected applications.

Alternatively, configure this handler as a chain containing a TransactionIdOutboundFilter, as in the following configuration:

providerHandler : {
  "type" : "Chain",
  "config" : {
    "handler": "MySecureClientHandler",
    "filters": [ "TransactionIdOutboundFilter" ]
  }
}

Default: ForgeRockClientHandler

TokenIntrospectionAccessTokenResolver

Use the token introspection endpoint, /oauth2/introspect, to resolve access tokens and retrieve metadata about the token, such as approved scopes and the context in which the token was issued.

The introspection endpoint is defined as a standard method for resolving access tokens, in RFC-7662, OAuth 2.0 Token Introspection.

"accessTokenResolver": {
  "type": "TokenIntrospectionAccessTokenResolver",
  "config": {
    "amService": AmService reference,   // Use either "amService"
    "endpoint": URI string,             // or "endpoint", but not both.
    "providerHandler": Handler reference
  }
}

For an example route, see Section 8.4.2, "Validating Access Tokens Through the Introspection Endpoint" in the Gateway Guide.

"amService": AmService reference, required if "endpoint" is not configured

The AmService heap object to use for the token introspection endpoint. The endpoint is extrapolated from the url property of the AmService.

When the authorization server is AM, use this property to define the token introspection endpoint.

If amService is configured, it takes precedence over endpoint.

See also, AmService(5).

"endpoint": URI string, required if "amService" is not configured

The URI to the token introspection endpoint. Use /oauth2/introspect.

When the authorization server is not AM, use this property to define the token introspection endpoint.

If amService is configured, it takes precedence over endpoint.

"providerHandler": Handler reference, optional

Invoke this HTTP client handler to send token info requests.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

Default: ForgeRockClientHandler

If you use the AM token introspection endpoint, this handler can be a Chain containing a HeaderFilter to add the authorization to the request header, as in the following example:

"providerHandler": {
  "type": "Chain",
  "config": {
    "filters": [
      {
        "type": "HeaderFilter",
        "config": {
          "messageType": "request",
          "add": {
            "Authorization": [ "Basic ${encodeBase64('<client_id>:<client_secret>')}" ]
          }
        }
      }
    ],
    "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
  }
}

ScriptableAccessTokenResolver

Receive a string representing an access token and use it to create an instance or promise of org.forgerock.http.oauth2.AccessTokenInfo.

"scopes": array of runtime expression<string>, required

The list of required OAuth 2.0 scopes for this protected resource.

See also Expressions(5).

"cache": object, optional

Configuration of caching for OAuth 2.0 access tokens. By default, access tokens are not cached.

When an access token is cached, IG can reuse the token information without repeatedly asking the authorization server to verify the access token. When caching is disabled, IG must ask the authorization server to verify the access token for each request.

The following example caches access tokens for these times:

  • One hour, if the access token doesn't provide a valid expiry value.

  • The duration specified by the token expiry value, when the token expiry value is shorter than one day.

  • One day, when the token expiry value is longer than one day.

"cache": {
  "enabled": true,
  "defaultTimeout": "1 hour",
  "maxTimeout": "1 day"
}

enabled: boolean, optional

Enable or disable caching.

Default: false

defaultTimeout: configuration expression<duration string>, optional

The duration for which to cache an OAuth 2.0 access token if it doesn't provide a valid expiry value.

If an access token provides an expiry value that falls before the current time plus the maxTimeout, IG uses the token expiry value.

Default: 1 minute

maxTimeout: configuration expression<duration string>, optional

The maximum duration for which to cache OAuth 2.0 access tokens.

If an access token provides an expiry value that falls after the current time plus the maxTimeout, IG uses the maxTimeout.

The duration cannot be zero or unlimited.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"executor": executor, optional

An executor service to schedule the execution of tasks, such as the eviction of entries in the access token cache.

Default: ScheduledExecutorService

See also ScheduledExecutorService(5).

"requireHttps": boolean, optional

Whether to require that requests use the HTTPS scheme.

Default: true

"realm": string, optional

HTTP authentication realm to include in the WWW-Authenticate response header field when returning an HTTP 401 Unauthorized status to a user-agent that need to authenticate.

Default: IG

Example

The following example configures an OAuth 2.0 resource filter to validate an access token against the AM token info endpoint. The filter expects to retrieve the scopes mail and employeenumber in the token, and returns an HTTP 403 Forbidden status if the scopes are not present.

{
  "name": "ProtectedResourceFilter",
  "type": "OAuth2ResourceServerFilter",
  "config": {
    "scopes": [
      "mail",
      "employeenumber"
    ],
    "requireHttps": false,
    "accessTokenResolver": {
      "type": "OpenAmAccessTokenResolver",
      "config": {
        "amService": "MyAmService"
      }
    }
  }
}

For information about how to set up examples using OAuth2ResourceServerFilter, see Chapter 8, "Acting as an OAuth 2.0 Resource Server" in the Gateway Guide.


Name

PasswordReplayFilter — replay credentials with a single filter

Description

Replays credentials in a single composite filter for the following cases:

  • When the request is for a login page

  • When the response contains a login page

When the response contains a login page, a PasswordReplayFilter can extract values from the response entity and reuse the values when replaying credentials.

A PasswordReplayFilter does not retry failed authentication attempts.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "PasswordReplayFilter",
    "config": {
        "request": request configuration object,
        "loginPage": runtime expression<boolean>,
        "loginPageContentMarker": pattern,
        "credentials": Filter reference,
        "headerDecryption": crypto configuration object,
        "loginPageExtractions": [ extract configuration object, ... ]
    }
}

Properties

"request": request configuration object, required

The request that replays the credentials.

The request configuration object has the following fields:

"method": string, required

The HTTP method to be performed on the resource such as GET or POST.

"uri": string, required

The fully qualified URI of the resource to access such as http://www.example.com/login.

"entity": expression, optional

The entity body to include in the request.

This setting is mutually exclusive with the form setting when the method is set to POST.

See also Expressions(5).

"form": object, optional

A form to include in the request.

The param specifies the form parameter name. Its value is an array of expressions to evaluate as form field values.

This setting is mutually exclusive with the entity setting when the method is set to POST.

"headers": object, optional

Header fields to set in the request.

The name specifies the header name. Its value is an array of expressions to evaluate as header values.

"version": string, optional

The HTTP protocol version.

Default: "HTTP/1.1".

The implementation uses a StaticRequestFilter. The fields are the same as those described in StaticRequestFilter(5).

"loginPage": runtime expression<boolean>, required unless loginPageContentMarker is defined

An expression that is true when a login page is requested, false otherwise.

For example, the following expression specifies that an HTTP GET to the path /login is a request for a login page:

${matches(request.uri.path, '/login') and (request.method == 'GET')}

IG evaluates the expression only for the request, not for the response.

See also Expressions(5).

"loginPageContentMarker": pattern, required unless loginPage is defined

A pattern that matches when a response entity is that of a login page.

For an example route that uses this property, see Section 13.4, "Login Form With Password Replay and Cookie Filters" in the Gateway Guide.

See also Patterns(5).

"credentials": Filter reference, optional

Filter that injects credentials, making them available for replay. Consider using a FileAttributesFilter or a SqlAttributesFilter.

When this is not specified, credentials must be made available to the request by other means.

See also Filters.

"headerDecryption": crypto configuration object, optional

Object to decrypt request headers that contain credentials to replay.

The crypto configuration object has the following fields:

"key": expression, required

Base64 encoded key value.

See also Expressions(5).

"algorithm": string, optional

Algorithm used for decryption.

Use the same algorithm that is used to send the encrypted credentials.

Default: AES/ECB/PKCS5Padding

"keyType": string, optional

Algorithm name for the secret key.

Default: AES

"headers": array of strings, optional

The names of header fields to decrypt.

Default: Do not decrypt any headers.

"loginPageExtractions": extract configuration array, optional

Object to extract values from the login page entity.

For an example route that uses this property, see Section 13.5, "Login Which Requires a Hidden Value From the Login Page" in the Gateway Guide.

The extract configuration array is a series of configuration objects. To extract multiple values, use multiple extract configuration objects. Each object has the following fields:

"name": string, required

Name of the field where the extracted value is put.

The names are mapped into attributes.extracted.

For example, if the name is nonce, the value can be obtained with the expression ${attributes.extracted.nonce}.

The name isLoginPage is reserved to hold a boolean that indicates whether the response entity is a login page.

"pattern": pattern, required

The regular expression pattern to find in the entity.

The pattern must contain one capturing group. (If it contains more than one, only the value matching the first group is placed into attributes.extracted.)

For example, suppose the login page entity contains a nonce required to authenticate, and the nonce in the page looks like nonce='n-0S6_WzA2Mj'. To extract n-0S6_WzA2Mj, set "pattern": " nonce='(.*)'".

See also Patterns(5).

Examples

The following example route authenticates requests using static credentials whenever the request is for /login. This PasswordReplayFilter example does not include any mechanism for remembering when authentication has already been successful. It simply replays the authentication every time that the request is for /login:

{
    "handler": {
        "type": "Chain",
        "config": {
            "filters": [
                {
                    "type": "PasswordReplayFilter",
                    "config": {
                        "loginPage": "${request.uri.path == '/login'}",
                        "request": {
                            "method": "POST",
                            "uri": "https://www.example.com:8444/login",
                            "form": {
                                "username": [
                                    "MY_USERNAME"
                                ],
                                "password": [
                                    "MY_PASSWORD"
                                ]
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            ],
            "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
        }
    }
}

For additional examples, see Chapter 13, "Configuration Templates" in the Gateway Guide, and the Javadoc for the PasswordReplayFilter class.


Name

PolicyEnforcementFilter — enforce policy decisions from AM

Description

This filter requests policy decisions from AM, which allows or denies the request based on the request context, the request URI, and the AM policies. Attributes and advices returned by the policy decision are are stored in the policyDecision context. For information, see PolicyDecisionContext(5).

Processing Requests After a Policy Decision

After a policy decision, IG continues to process requests as follows:

  • If the request is allowed, processing continues.

  • If the request is denied with advice, IG checks whether it can respond to the advice. If IG can, it sends a redirect to AM, with information about how to meet the conditions in the advice.

  • If the request is denied without advice, or if IG cannot respond to the advice, IG forwards the request to a failureHandler declared in the PolicyEnforcementFilter. If there is no failureHandler, IG returns a 403 Forbidden.

  • If an error occurs during the process, IG returns 500 Internal Server Error.

Using Advices From Policy Decisions

IG responds to the following advice types from AM:

  • AuthLevel: The minimum authentication level at which a user-agent must authenticate to access a resource.

  • AuthenticateToService: The name of an authorization chain or service to which a user-agent must authenticate to access a resource.

  • AuthenticateToRealm: The name of a realm to which a user-agent must authenticate to access a resource.

  • AuthScheme: The name of an authentication module to which a user-agent must authenticate to access a resource, the policy set name, and the authentication timeout.

Notes on Configuring Policies in AM

In the AM policy, remember to configure the Resources parameter with the URI of the protected application.

The request URI from IG must match the Resources parameter defined in the AM policy. If the URI of the incoming request is changed before it enters the policy filter (for example, by rebasing or scripting), remember to change the Resources parameter in AM policy accordingly.

Enable Websocket Notifications

When WebSocket notifications are set up for changes to policies, IG receives a notification from AM when a policy decision is created, deleted, or updated. IG then clears the policy cache.

To set up WebSocket notifications for changes to policies:

  • In AM, configure a J2EE agent. For example, in AM, select select Applications > Agents > J2EE, and add an agent with the following values:

    • Name: JavaEE

    • Password: password

    • Server URL: http://openam.example.com:8088/openam

    • Agent URL: http://openig.example.com:8080/agentapp

  • In the AmService heap object, configure the agent property with the same credentials as the J2EE agent.

  • In the PolicyEnforcementFilter, enable the cache.

To include the WebSocket notifications in your server log files, add the following line to your logback.xml as described in Section 18.2, " Reference Logback Configuration " in the Gateway Guide:

<logger name="org.forgerock.openig.tools.notifications" level="TRACE"/>

Notifications like this are included in the log files:

2018-... | TRACE | Grizzly(1) | o.f.o.t.n.w.WebSocketClientEndpoint | @system | Received a message: { "topic": "/agent/policy",...

For an example route that uses WebSocket notifications to clear the policy cache, see "Example Route Using WebSocket Notifications to Clear Cache".

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "PolicyEnforcementFilter",
    "config": {
        "amService": AmService reference,
        "pepUsername": expression,
        "pepPassword": expression,
        "pepRealm": string,
        "ssoTokenSubject": runtime expression<string>,
        "jwtSubject": runtime expression<string>,
        "claimsSubject": map or runtime expression<map>,
        "cache": object,
        "application": string,
        "environment": map or runtime expression<map>,
        "failureHandler": handler reference
   }
}

Properties

"amService": AmService reference, required

The AmService heap object to use for the following properties:

  • url, the URL of an AM service to use for session token validation and authentication.

  • realm, the realm to use when requesting policy decisions

  • ssoTokenHeader, the name of the HTTP header that provides the session token created by AM

  • amHandler, the handler to use when requesting policy decisions from AM.

  • agent, the AM J2EE agent that communicates WebSocket notifications to IG.

See also, AmService(5).

"pepUsername": expression, required

The username of the AM agent.

See also Expressions(5).

"pepPassword": expression, required

The password of the AM agent.

See also Expressions(5).

"pepRealm": string, optional

The realm of the AM agent.

Default: The value used by amService.realm.

"ssoTokenSubject": runtime expression<string>, required if neither of the following properties are present: "jwtSubject", "claimsSubject"

The AM SSO or CDSSO token ID string for the subject making the request to the protected resource.

ssoTokenSubject can take the following values:

  • ${contexts.ssoToken.value}, when the SingleSignOnFilter is used for authentication

  • ${contexts.ssoToken.value} or ${contexts.cdsso.token}, when the CrossDomainSingleSignOnFilter is used for authentication

When no SSO is involved (API protection), then ssoTokenSubject usually points to a header value (${request.headers.iPlanetDirectoryPro[0]}).

See also Expressions(5).

"jwtSubject": runtime expression<string>, required if neither of the following properties are present: "ssoTokenSubject", "claimsSubject"

The JWT string for the subject making the request to the protected resource.

To use the raw id_token (base64, not decoded) returned by the OpenID Connect Provider during authentication, place an OAuth2ClientFilter filter before the PEP filter, and then use ${attributes.openid.id_token} as the expression value.

See also OAuth2ClientFilter(5) and Expressions(5).

"claimsSubject": map or runtime expression<map>, required if neither of the following properties are present: "jwtSubject", "ssoTokenSubject"

A representation of JWT claims for the subject. The subject must be specified, but the JWT claims can contain other information such as the token issuer, expiration, and so on.

If this property is a map, the structure must have the format Map<String, Object>. The value is evaluated as an expression.

"claimsSubject": {
  "sub": "${attributes.subject_identifier}",
  "iss": "openam.example.com"
}

If this property is an expression, its evaluation must give an object of type Map<String, Object>.

"claimsSubject": "${attributes.openid.id_token_claims}"

See also Expressions(5).

"application": string, optional

The AM policy set to use when requesting policy decisions.

Default: Default Policy Set

cache: object, optional

Enable and configure caching of policy decisions from AM, based on Caffeine. For more information, see the GitHub entry, Caffeine.

Default: Policy decisions are not cached.

Note

Policy decisions that contain advices are never cached.

The following code example caches AM policy decisions without advices for these times:

  • One hour, when the policy decision doesn't provide a ttl value.

  • The duration specified by the ttl, when ttl is shorter than one day.

  • One day, when ttl is longer than one day.

"cache": {
  "enabled": true,
  "defaultTimeout": "1 hour",
  "maximumTimeToCache": "1 day"
}

enabled: boolean, optional

Enable or disable caching of policy decisions.

When a policy decision is cached, IG can reuse the policy decision without repeatedly asking AM for a new policy decision. When caching is disabled, IG must ask AM to make a decision for each request.

Default: false

defaultTimeout: duration, optional

The default duration for which to cache AM policy decisions.

If an AM policy decision provides a valid ttl value to specify the time until which the policy decision remains valid, IG uses that value or the maxTimeout.

Default: 1 minute

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

executor: executor, optional

An executor service to schedule the execution of tasks, such as the eviction of entries in the cache.

Default: ForkJoinPool.commonPool()

"maximumSize": configuration expression<number>, optional

The maximum number of entries the cache can contain.

Default: Unlimited/unbound.

maximumTimeToCache: duration, optional

The maximum duration for which to cache AM policy decisions.

If the ttl value provided by the AM policy decision is after the current time plus the maximumTimeToCache, IG uses the maximumTimeToCache.

The duration cannot be zero or unlimited.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"environment": map or runtime expression<map>, optional

A list of strings to forward to AM with the request for a policy decision, that represent the environment (or context) of the request. Forward any HTTP header or any value that the AM policy definition can use.

AM can use the environment conditions to set the circumstances under which a policy applies. For example, environment conditions can specify that the policy applies only during working hours or only when accessing from a specific IP address.

If this property is a map, the structure must have the format Map<String, List<String>>. In the following example, the PolicyEnforcementFilter forwards standard and non-standard request headers, an ID token, and the IP address of the subject making the request:

"environment": {
  "H-Via": "${request.headers['Via']}",
  "H-X-Forwarded-For": "${request.headers['X-Forwarded-For']}",
  "H-myHeader": "${request.headers['myHeader']}",
  "id_token": [
    "${attributes.openid.id_token}"
  ],
    "IP": [
      "${contexts.client.remoteAddress}"
  ]
}

If this property is an expression, its evaluation must give an object of type Map<String, List<String>>.

"environment": "${attributes.my_environment}"
"failureHandler": handler reference, optional

Handler to treat requests when they are denied by the policy decision.

In the following example, the failureHandler is a chain with a scriptable filter. If there are some advices with the policy decision, the script recovers the advices for processing. Otherwise, it passes the request to the StaticResponseHandler to display a message.

"failureHandler":{
  "type": "Chain",
  "config": {
    "filters": [
      {
        "type": "ScriptableFilter",
        "config": {
          "type": "application/x-groovy",
          "source": [
            "if (contexts.policyDecision.advices['MyCustomAdvice'] != null) {",
            "  return handleCustomAdvice(context, request)",
            "} else {",
            "  return next.handle(context, request)",
            "}"
          ]
        }
      }
    ],
    "handler" : {
      "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
      "config": {
        "status": 403,
        "entity": "Restricted area. You do not have sufficient privileges."
      }
    }
  }
}

Provide an inline handler configuration object, or the name of a handler object that is defined in the heap.

See also Handlers.

Default: HTTP 403 Forbidden, the request stops being executed.

Example Route Using WebSocket Notifications to Clear Cache

The following route builds on the example, in Section 6.2, "Enforcing Policy Decisions From AM" in the Gateway Guide. The AmService heap object is configured to receive WebSocket notifications from AM, and the policy cache and session cache is enabled.

{
  "name" : "04-pep-notif",
  "baseURI" : "http://app.example.com:8081",
  "condition" : "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/pep')}",
  "monitor" : false,
  "heap" : [ {
    "name" : "AmService",
    "type" : "AmService",
    "config" : {
      "url" : "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam",
      "realm" : "/",
      "ssoTokenHeader" : "iPlanetDirectoryPro",
      "version" : "5.5.1",
      "agent" : {
        "username" : "J2EE",
        "password" : "password"
      },
      "sessionCache": {
        "enabled" : true
      }
    }
  } ],
  "handler" : {
    "type" : "Chain",
    "config" : {
      "filters" : [ {
        "name" : "SingleSignOnFilter-1",
        "type" : "SingleSignOnFilter",
        "config" : {
          "amService" : "AmService"
        }
      }, {
        "name" : "PolicyEnforcementFilter-1",
        "type" : "PolicyEnforcementFilter",
        "config" : {
          "pepUsername" : "J2EE",
          "pepPassword" : "password",
          "pepRealm" : "/",
          "application" : "PEP policy set",
          "ssoTokenSubject" : "${contexts.ssoToken.value}",
          "amService" : "AmService",
          "cache" : {
            "enabled" : true
          }
        }
      } ],
      "handler" : "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  }
}

Name

ScriptableFilter — process requests and responses by using a script

Description

Processes requests and responses by using a Groovy script.

The script must return either a Promise<Response, NeverThrowsException> or a Response.

Important

When you are writing scripts or Java extensions, never use a Promise blocking method, such as get(), getOrThrow(), or getOrThrowUninterruptibly(), to obtain the response.

A promise represents the result of an asynchronous operation. Therefore, using a blocking method to wait for the result can cause deadlocks and/or race issues.

For information about creating scriptable objects in Studio, see Section 14.1.2, "Scripting in Studio" in the Gateway Guide and Section 17.3, " Configuring a Scriptable Throttling Filter " in the Gateway Guide.

Objects

The script has access to the following global objects:

Any parameters passed as args

You can use the configuration to pass parameters to the script by specifying an args object.

The args object is a map whose values can be scalars, arrays, and objects. The args object can reference objects defined in the heap by using expressions, for example, "${heap['ObjectName']}".

The values for script arguments can be defined as configuration expressions, and evaluated at configuration time.

Script arguments cannot refer to context and request, but context and request variables can be accessed directly within scripts.

Take care when naming keys in the args object. If you reuse the name of another global object, cause the script to fail and IG to return a response with HTTP status code 500 Internal Server Error.

All heap objects

The heap object configuration, described in Heap Objects(5).

openig

An implicit object that provides access to the environment when expressions are evaluated.

attributes

The attributes object provides access to a context map of arbitrary attributes, which is a mechanism for transferring transient state between components when processing a single request.

Use session for maintaining state between successive requests from the same logical client.

context

The processing context.

This context is the leaf of a chain of contexts. It provides access to other Context types, such as SessionContext, AttributesContext, and ClientContext, through the context.asContext(ContextClass.class) method.

contexts

a map<string, context> object. For information, see Contexts(5).

request

The HTTP request.

globals

This object is a Map that holds variables that persist across successive invocations.

http

An embedded client for making outbound HTTP requests, which is an org.forgerock.http.Client.

If a "clientHandler" is set in the configuration, then that Handler is used. Otherwise, the default ClientHandler configuration is used.

For details, see Handlers.

ldap

The ldap object provides an embedded LDAP client.

Use this client to perform outbound LDAP requests, such as LDAP authentication.

logger

The logger object provides access to a unique SLF4J logger instance for scripts, where the logger instance is named with the script name.

For information about logging for scripts, see Section 18.4.3, "Logging for Scripts" in the Gateway Guide.

next

The next object refers to the next handler in the filter chain.

session

The session object provides access to the session context, which is a mechanism for maintaining state when processing a successive requests from the same logical client or end-user.

Use attributes for transferring transient state between components when processing a single request.

When you have finished processing the request, execute return next.handle(context, request) to call the next filter or handler in the current chain and return the value from the call. Actions on the response must be performed in the Promise's callback methods.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "ScriptableFilter",
    "config": {
        "type": string,
        "file": expression,                     // Use either "file"
        "source": string or array of strings,   // or "source", but not both.
        "args": object,
        "clientHandler": Handler reference
    }
}

Properties

"type": string, required

The Internet media type (formerly MIME type) of the script, "application/x-groovy" for Groovy

"file": expression

Path to the file containing the script; mutually exclusive with "source"

Relative paths in the file field are relative to the base location for scripts. The base location depends on the configuration. For details, see Section 2.3, "Installing IG" in the Gateway Guide.

The base location for Groovy scripts is on the classpath when the scripts are executed. If some Groovy scripts are not in the default package, but instead have their own package names, they belong in the directory corresponding to their package name. For example, a script in package com.example.groovy belongs under openig-base/scripts/groovy/com/example/groovy/.

"source": string or array of strings, required if "file" is not used

The script as a string or array of strings; mutually exclusive with "file".

The following example shows the source of a script as an array of strings:

"source" : [
    "Response response = new Response(Status.OK)",
    "response.entity = 'foo'",
    "return response"
]

"args": map, optional

Parameters passed from the configuration to the script.

  • The following example configures arguments as a map whose values can are scalars, arrays, and objects:

    {
      "args": {
        "title": "Coffee time",
        "status": 418,
        "reason": [
          "Not Acceptable",
          "I'm a teapot",
          "Acceptable"
        ],
        "names": {
          "1": "koffie",
          "2": "kafe",
          "3": "cafe",
          "4": "kafo"
        }
      }
    }

    A script can access the args parameters in the same way as other global objects. The following example sets the response status to I'm a teapot:

    response.status = Status.valueOf(418, reason[1])

    For information about the 418 status code see RFC 7168, Section 2.3.3 418 I'm a Teapot.

  • The following example configures arguments as strings and numbers for a ScriptableThrottlingPolicy:

    "args" : {
      "status" : "gold",
      "rate" : 6,
      "duration": "10 seconds"
    }

    The following lines set the throttling rate to 6 requests each 10 seconds when the response status is gold:

    "if (attributes.rate.status == status) {",
    "  return new ThrottlingRate(rate, duration)"
  • The following example configures arguments that reference a SampleFilter defined in the heap:

    {
      "heap": [
        {
          "name": "SampleFilter",
          "type": "SampleFilter",
          "config": {
            "name": "X-Greeting",
            "value": "Hello world"
          }
        }
      ]
    }

    The following line uses an expression in the args parameter to pass SampleFilter to the script:

    {
      "args": {
        "filter": "${heap['SampleFilter']}"
      }
    }

    The script can then reference SampleFilter as filter.

"clientHandler", ClientHandler reference, optional

A Handler for making outbound HTTP requests.

Default: Use the default ClientHandler.

For details, see Handlers.

Example

See the following examples of scriptable filters:


Name

SessionInfoFilter — Capture Information About the AM Session and Store It In the Context

Description

This filter calls the AM endpoint for session information, and makes the data available as a new context to downstream IG filters and handlers. For information, see SessionInfoContext(5). Session properties that are whitelisted in AM are available.

This filter is compatible with AM 5 or higher.

For more information about AM sessions, see Using Sessions in the AM Authentication and Single Sign-On Guide.

Usage

{
  "name": string,
  "type": "SessionInfoFilter",
  "config": {
    "amService": AmService reference,
    "ssoToken": runtime expression<string>
  }
}

Properties

"amService": AmService reference, required

The AmService heap object to use for the following properties:

  • url, the URL of an AM service to use for session token validation and authentication.

  • amHandler, the handler to use when communicating with AM to validate the token in the incoming request.

This filter is compatible with AM version 5 or higher.

See also, AmService(5).

"ssoToken": runtime expression<string>, optional

Location of the AM SSO token. For example, with ${request.headers['mySsoToken'].values[0]} the SSO token is the first value of the mySsoToken header in the request.

Default: ${request.cookies['AmService-ssoTokenHeader'][0].value}, where AmService-ssoTokenHeader is the name of the header or cookie where the AmService expects to find SSO tokens.

Examples

In the following example, the SingleSignOnFilter requires authentication with AM before passing the request along the chain. The SessionInfoFilter collects session info from AM and stores it in the ${contexts.amSession} context. Then the HeaderFilter adds headers containing some of the session info to the request. The session info is then displayed on the home page of the sample application:

{
  "name" : "session-info",
  "baseURI" : "http://app.example.com:8081",
  "condition" : "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/session-info')}",
  "heap": [
    {
      "name": "AmService-1",
      "type": "AmService",
      "config": {
        "url": "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam",
        "version": "6.0"
      }
    }
  ],
  "handler" : {
    "type" : "Chain",
    "config" : {
      "filters" : [
        {
          "name": "SingleSignOnFilter",
          "type": "SingleSignOnFilter",
          "config": {
            "amService": "AmService-1"
          }
        },
        {
          "name": "SessionInfoFilter",
          "type": "SessionInfoFilter",
          "config": {
            "amService": "AmService-1"
          }
        },
        {
          "name": "HeaderFilter",
          "type": "HeaderFilter",
          "config": {
            "messageType": "REQUEST",
            "add": {
              "X-IG-SessionInfo": [ "username: ${contexts.amSession.username}, realm: ${contexts.amSession.realm}, properties: ${contexts.amSession.properties}" ]
            }
          }
        }
      ],
      "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  }
}

To try this example:

  1. With AM, IG, and the sample application running, access the route on http://openig.example.com:8080/home/session-info, and then log in to AM as user demo, password changeit.

    The home page of the sample application is displayed.

  2. Note that the header x-ig-sessioninfo and its values are displayed:

    x-ig-sessioninfo: username: demo, realm: /, properties: {}

To capture additional session properties from AM:

  1. On AM, add the property user-status to the Session Property Whitelist Service. For information, see Session Property Whitelist Service .

  2. On IG, access the route and note that user-status is now displayed:

    x-ig-sessioninfo: username: demo, realm: /, properties: {user-status=}

To add a value to a property and capture it:

  1. Post the value gold to user-status:

    $ curl --request POST --header "iPlanetDirectoryPro: <token>" \
    --header 'Accept-API-Version: resource=2.0' \
    --header "Content-Type: application/json" \
    'http://openam.example.com:8088/openam/json/sessions/?_action=updateSessionProperties' \
    --data '{"user-status":"gold"}'

    Where <token> is the value of the iPlanetDirectoryPro cookie displayed on the home page of the sample application.

  2. On IG, access the route again and note that the value of user-status is displayed:

    x-ig-sessioninfo: username: demo, realm: /, properties: {user-status=gold}


Name

SingleSignOnFilter — require AM authentication before processing a request

Description

This filter tests for the presence and validity of an SSO token in the cookie header of a request:

  • If an SSO token is present, the filter calls AM to validate the SSO token. If the SSO token is valid, the request continues along the chain. The token value and additional information are stored in the ssoToken context. For information, see SsoTokenContext(5).

  • If the SSO token is not present, or is empty or invalid, the filter redirects the user-agent for authentication to the AM login page or another provided login page.

For more information about SSO, see Section 5.1, "About SSO Using the SingleSignOnFilter" in the Gateway Guide.

Tip

To prevent issues with performance when accessing large resources, such as .jpg and .js files, consider using the SingleSignOnFilter with the following options:

  • The sessionCache, so that IG can reuse session token information without repeatedly asking AM to verify the session token.

  • A ConditionalFilter, so that requests to access large resources skip the SingleSignOnFilter. For an example configuration, see the example in ConditionalFilter(5).

Note

Each time the SingleSignOnFilter validates an SSO token on AM, the idle timeout for the AM stateful session is reset. As a result, validating a session token triggers a write operation to the AM Core Token Service token store.

For information about token validation in AM, see Using Sessions in the AM Authentication and Single Sign-On Guide.

Enable Websocket Notifications

When WebSocket notifications are set up for sessions, IG receives a notification from AM when a user logs out of AM, or when the AM session is modified, closed, or times out. IG then evicts entries from the sessionCache related to the event.

To set up cache eviction for session information:

  • In AM, configure a J2EE agent. For example, in AM, select select Applications > Agents > J2EE, and add an agent with the following values:

    • Name: JavaEE

    • Password: password

    • Server URL: http://openam.example.com:8088/openam

    • Agent URL: http://openig.example.com:8080/agentapp

  • In the AmService heap object, configure the agent property with the same credentials as the J2EE agent.

  • In the AmService heap object, enable the sessionCache.

To include the WebSocket notifications in your server log files, add the following line to your logback.xml as described in Section 18.2, " Reference Logback Configuration " in the Gateway Guide:

<logger name="org.forgerock.openig.tools.notifications" level="TRACE"/>

Notifications like this are included in the log files:

2018... | TRACE | Grizzly(2) | o.f.o.t.n.w.WebSocketClientEndpoint | @system | Received a message: { "topic": "/agent/session",...

For an example route that uses WebSocket notifications to evict entries from the session cache, see "Example Route Using WebSocket Notifications to Clear Cache".

Usage

{
  "name": string,
  "type": "SingleSignOnFilter",
    "config": {
      "amService": AmService reference,
      "defaultLogoutLandingPage": expression<uri>,
      "loginEndpoint": expression<uri>,
      "logoutEndpoint": pattern
  }
}

Properties

"amService": AmService reference, required if "loginEndpoint" is not used

The AmService heap object to use for the following properties:

  • url, the URL of an AM service to use for session token validation and authentication.

    When loginEndpoint is specified, the SingleSignOnFilter does not use amService for the authentication URL.

  • realm, the AM realm to use for authentication.

  • ssoTokenHeader, the name of the cookie that contains the session token created by AM.

  • amHandler, the handler to use when communicating with AM to validate the token in the incoming request.

  • agent, the AM J2EE agent that communicates WebSocket notifications to IG.

  • sessionCache, the configuration of a cache for session information from AM.

See also, AmService(5).

"defaultLogoutLandingPage": expression<uri>, optional

The URI to which a request is redirected after the user logs out of AM.

This parameter is effective only when logoutEndpoint is specified.

Default: None. Processing continues.

"loginEndpoint": URI expression, required if "amService" is not used

The URL of a service to manage authentication, and the location to which the request is redirected after authentication.

When this property is specified, the SingleSignOnFilter does not use amService for the authentication URL.

Authentication can be performed in the following ways:

  • Directly through AM, with optional authentication parameters in the query string, such as service, module, and realm. For a list of authentication parameters that you can include in the query string, see Authentication Parameters in the AM Authentication and Single Sign-On Guide.

    The value must include a redirect with a goto parameter, which is added by default when the openamUrl property is used for the authentication URL.

    The following example uses AM as the authentication service, and includes the service authentication parameter:

    "loginEndpoint" : "https://openam.example.com/openam?
    service=TwoFactor&goto=${urlEncodeQueryParameterNameOrValue(contexts.router.originalUri)}"

  • Through the URL of another application, with optional authentication parameters in the query string, such as service, module, and realm. The application must create a session with an AM instance to set an SSO token and return the request to the redirect location.

    The value can optionally include a redirect with a goto parameter or different parameter name.

    The following example uses an authentication service that is not AM, and includes a redirect parameter:

    "loginEndpoint" : "https://authservice.example.com/auth?
    redirect=${urlEncodeQueryParameterNameOrValue(contexts.router.originalUri)}"

    When using this option, review the cookie domains to make sure that cookies set by the authentication server are properly conveyed to the IG instance.

Default: None.

"logoutEndpoint" pattern, optional

A string denoting a regular expression pattern for a URL. When a request matches the pattern, IG performs the logout process and the AM authentication token for the end user is revoked.

If a defaultLogoutLandingPage is specified, the request is redirected to that page. Otherwise, the request continues to be processed.

Default: Logout is not managed by this filter.

Example Route Using WebSocket Notifications With Caches

The following route builds on the example, in Section 6.2, "Enforcing Policy Decisions From AM" in the Gateway Guide. The AmService heap object is configured to receive WebSocket notifications from AM, and the policy cache and session cache is enabled.

   {
  "name" : "04-pep-notif",
  "baseURI" : "http://app.example.com:8081",
  "condition" : "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/pep')}",
  "monitor" : false,
  "heap" : [ {
    "name" : "AmService",
    "type" : "AmService",
    "config" : {
      "url" : "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam",
      "realm" : "/",
      "ssoTokenHeader" : "iPlanetDirectoryPro",
      "version" : "5.5.1",
      "agent" : {
        "username" : "J2EE",
        "password" : "password"
      },
      "sessionCache": {
        "enabled" : true
      }
    }
  } ],
  "handler" : {
    "type" : "Chain",
    "config" : {
      "filters" : [ {
        "name" : "SingleSignOnFilter-1",
        "type" : "SingleSignOnFilter",
        "config" : {
          "amService" : "AmService"
        }
      }, {
        "name" : "PolicyEnforcementFilter-1",
        "type" : "PolicyEnforcementFilter",
        "config" : {
          "pepUsername" : "J2EE",
          "pepPassword" : "password",
          "pepRealm" : "/",
          "application" : "PEP policy set",
          "ssoTokenSubject" : "${contexts.ssoToken.value}",
          "amService" : "AmService",
          "cache" : {
            "enabled" : true
          }
        }
      } ],
      "handler" : "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  }
}

Name

SqlAttributesFilter — execute SQL query

Description

Executes a SQL query through a prepared statement and exposes its first result. Parameters in the prepared statement are derived from expressions. The query result is exposed in an object whose location is specified by the target expression. If the query yields no result, then the resulting object is empty.

The execution of the query is performed lazily; it does not occur until the first attempt to access a value in the target. This defers the overhead of connection pool, network and database query processing until a value is first required. This also means that the parameters expressions is not evaluated until the object is first accessed.

Usage

{
     "name": string,
     "type": "SqlAttributesFilter",
     "config": {
         "dataSource": string,
         "preparedStatement": string,
         "parameters": [ runtime expression<string>, ... ],
         "target": lvalue-expression
     }
}

Properties

"dataSource": string, required

The JNDI name of the factory for connections to the physical data source.

"preparedStatement": string, required

The parameterized SQL query to execute, with ? parameter placeholders.

"parameters": array of runtime expressions<string>, optional

The parameters to evaluate and include in the execution of the prepared statement.

See also Expressions(5).

"target": lvalue-expression, required

Expression that yields the target object that will contain the query results.

See also Expressions(5).

Example

Using the user's session ID from a cookie, query the database to find the user logged in and set the profile attributes in the attributes context:

{
        "name": "SqlAttributesFilter",
        "type": "SqlAttributesFilter",
        "config": {
              "target": "${attributes.sql}",
              "dataSource": "java:comp/env/jdbc/mysql",
              "preparedStatement": "SELECT f.value AS 'first', l.value AS
                'last', u.mail AS 'email', GROUP_CONCAT(CAST(r.rid AS CHAR)) AS
                'roles'
                FROM sessions s
                INNER JOIN users u
                ON ( u.uid = s.uid AND u.status = 1 )
                LEFT OUTER JOIN profile_values f
                ON ( f.uid = u.uid AND f.fid = 1 )
                LEFT OUTER JOIN profile_values l
                ON ( l.uid = u.uid AND l.fid = 2 )
                LEFT OUTER JOIN users_roles r
                ON ( r.uid = u.uid )
                WHERE (s.sid = ? AND s.uid <> 0) GROUP BY s.sid;",
              "parameters": [ "${request.cookies
                [keyMatch(request.cookies,'JSESSION1234')]
                [0].value}" ]
         }
 }

Lines are folded for readability in this example. In your JSON, keep the values for "preparedStatement" and "parameters" on one line.


Name

StaticRequestFilter — create new request

Description

Creates a new request, replacing any existing request. The request can include an entity specified in the entity parameter. Alternatively, the request can include a form, specified in the form parameter, which is included in an entity encoded in application/x-www-form-urlencoded format if request method is POST, or otherwise as (additional) query parameters in the URI. The form and entity parameters cannot be used together when the method is set to POST.

Usage

{
     "name": string,
     "type": "StaticRequestFilter",
     "config": {
         "method": string,
         "uri": runtime expression<string>,
         "version": string,
         "headers": {
             configuration expression<string>: [ runtime expression<string>, ... ], ...
         },
         "form": {
             configuration expression<string>: [ runtime expression<string>, ... ], ...
         },
         "entity": runtime expression<string>
     }
}

Properties

"method": string, required

The HTTP method to be performed on the resource (for example, "GET").

"uri": runtime expression<string>, required

The fully-qualified URI of the resource to access (for example, "http://www.example.com/resource.txt").

The result of the expression must be a string that represents a valid URI, but is not a real java.net.URI object. For example, it would be incorrect to use ${request.uri}, which is not a String but a MutableUri.

"version": string, optional

Protocol version. Default: "HTTP/1.1".

"headers": object, optional

Header fields to set in the request, with the format name: [ value, ... ].

The name field of headers specifies the header name. It can be defined by a configuration expression or string. If the configuration expressions for multiple name resolve to the same final string, multiple values are associated with the name.

The value field of headers is an array of runtime expressions to evaluate as header values.

In the following example, the name of the header is the value of the configuration time, system variable defined in cookieHeaderName. The value of the header is the runtime value stored in contexts.ssoToken.value:

"headers": {
  "${application['header1Name']}": [
    "${application['header1Value'}"
  ]

"form": object, optional

A form to include in the request, with the format param: [ value, ... ].

The param field of form specifies the name of the form parameter. It can be defined by a configuration expression or string. If the configuration expressions for multiple param resolve to the same final string, multiple values are associated with the param.

The value field of form is an array of runtime expressions to evaluate as form field values.

When the method is set to POST, this setting is mutually exclusive with the entity setting.

In the following example, the names of the field parameters and the values are hardcoded in the form:

"form": {
  "username": [
    "demo"
  ],
  "password": [
    "changeit"
  ]

In the following example, the names of the field parameters are hardcoded. The values take the first value of username and password provided in the session:

"form": {
  "username": [
    "${session.username[0]}"
  ],
  "password": [
    "${session.password[0]}"
  ]

In the following example, the name of the first field param take the value of the expression ${application['formName']} when it is evaluated at startup. The values take the first value of username and password provided in the session:

"form": {
  "${application['formName']}": [
    "${session.username[0]}"
  ],
  "${application['formPassword']}": [
    "${session.password[0]}"
  ]

"entity": runtime expression<string>, optional

The entity body to include in the request.

This setting is mutually exclusive with the form setting when the method is set to POST.

See also Expressions(5).

Example

In the following example, IG replaces the browser's original HTTP GET request with an HTTP POST login request containing credentials to authenticate to the sample application. For information about how to set up and test this example, see Section 2.5, "Trying IG With a Simple Configuration" in the Getting Started Guide.

{
  "handler": {
    "type": "Chain",
    "config": {
      "filters": [
        {
          "type": "StaticRequestFilter",
          "config": {
            "method": "POST",
            "uri": "http://app.example.com:8081/login",
            "form": {
              "username": [
                "demo"
              ],
              "password": [
                "changeit"
              ]
            }
          }
        }
      ],
      "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  },
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/static')}"
}

Name

SwitchFilter — divert requests to another handler if a condition is met

Description

Verifies that a specified condition is met. If the condition is met or no condition is specified, the request is diverted to the associated handler, with no further processing by the switch filter.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "SwitchFilter",
    "config": {
        "onRequest": [
            {
                "condition": runtime expression<boolean>,
                "handler": Handler reference,
            },
            ...
        ],
        "onResponse": [
            {
                "condition": runtime expression<boolean>,
                "handler": Handler reference,
            },
            ...
        ]
    }
}

Properties

"onRequest": array of objects, optional

Conditions to test (and handler to dispatch to, if true) before the request is handled.

"onResponse": array of objects, optional

Conditions to test (and handler to dispatch to, if true) after the response is handled.

"condition": runtime expression<boolean>, optional

If the expression evaluates to true, the request is dispatched to the handler. If no condition is specified, the request is dispatched to the handler unconditionally.

Default: No condition is specified.

See also Expressions(5).

"handler": Handler reference, required

Dispatch to this handler if the condition yields true.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

See also Handlers.

Example

This example intercepts the response if it is equal to 200 and executes the LoginRequestHandler. This filter might be used in a login flow where the request for the login page must go through to the target, but the response should be intercepted in order to send the login form to the application. This is typical for scenarios where there is a hidden value or cookie returned in the login page, which must be sent in the login form:

{
    "name": "SwitchFilter",
    "type": "SwitchFilter",
    "config": {
        "onResponse": [
            {
                "condition": "${response.status.code == 200}",
                "handler": "LoginRequestHandler"
            }
        ]
    }
}

Name

TokenTransformationFilter — transform a token issued by AM to another type

Description

This filter transforms a token issued by AM to another token type.

The TokenTransformationFilter makes the result of the token transformation available to downstream handlers in the sts context. For information, see StsContext(5).

The current implementation uses REST Security Token Service (STS) APIs to transform an OpenID Connect ID Token (id_token) into a SAML 2.0 assertion. The subject confirmation method is Bearer, as described in Profiles for the OASIS Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) V2.0.

The TokenTransformationFilter makes the result of the token transformation available to downstream handlers in the issuedToken property of the ${contexts.sts} context.

The TokenTransformationFilter configuration references a REST STS instance that must be set up in AM before the TokenTransformationFilter can be used. The REST STS instance exposes a preconfigured transformation under a specific REST endpoint. For information about setting up a REST STS instance, see the AM documentation.

Errors that occur during the token transformation cause a error response to be returned to the client and an error message to be logged for the IG administrator.

Usage

{
    "name": "string",
    "type": "TokenTransformationFilter",
    "config": {
        "amService": AmService reference,
        "username": expression,
        "password": expression,
        "idToken": runtime expression<string>,
        "instance": "expression"
    }
}

Properties

"amService": AmService reference, required if "openamUri" is not configured

The AmService heap object to use for the following properties:

  • url, the URL of an AM service to use for session token validation and authentication. Authentication and REST STS requests are made to this service.

  • realm, the AM realm containing the following information:

    • The AM application that can make the REST STS request and whose credentials are the username and password.

    • The STS instance described by the instance field.

  • ssoTokenHeader, the name of the HTTP header that provides the SSO token for the REST STS client subject.

  • amHandler, the handler to use for authentication and STS requests to AM.

See also, AmService(5).

"username": expression, required

The username for authenticating IG as an AM REST STS client. This expression is evaluated when the route is initialized.

See also Expressions(5).

"password": expression, required

The password for authenticating IG as an AM REST STS client. This expression is evaluated when the route is initialized.

See also Expressions(5).

"idToken": runtime expression<string>, required

The value of the OpenID Connect ID token. The expected value is a string that is the JWT encoded id_token.

See also Expressions(5).

"instance": expression, required

An expression evaluating to the name of the REST STS instance.

This expression is evaluated when the route is initialized, so the expression cannot refer to request or contexts.

See also Expressions(5).

Example

The following example shows a configuration for a TokenTransformationFilter:

{
  "type": "TokenTransformationFilter",
  "config": {
    "amService": "MyAmService",
    "username": "oidc_client",
    "password": "password",
    "idToken": "${attributes.openid.id_token}",
    "instance": "openig"
  }
}

For an example of how to set up and test the TokenTransformationFilter, see Chapter 10, "Transforming OpenID Connect ID Tokens Into SAML Assertions" in the Gateway Guide.


Name

UmaFilter — protect access as an UMA resource server

Description

This filter acts as a policy enforcement point, protecting access as a User-Managed Access (UMA) resource server. Specifically, this filter ensures that a request for protected resources includes a valid requesting party token with appropriate scopes before allowing the response to flow back to the requesting party.

Usage

{
    "type": "UmaFilter",
    "config": {
        "protectionApiHandler": Handler reference,
        "umaService": UmaService reference,
        "realm": string
    }
}

Properties

"protectionApiHandler": Handler reference, required

The handler to use when interacting with the UMA authorization server for token introspection and permission requests, such as a ClientHandler capable of making an HTTPS connection to the server.

For details, see Handlers.

"umaService": UmaService reference, required

The UmaService to use when protecting resources.

For details, see UmaService(5).

"realm": string, optional

The UMA realm set in the response to a request for a protected resource that does not include a requesting party token enabling access to the resource.

Default: uma


Name

UserProfileFilter — retrieve AM user profile attributes and store them in the context

Description

This filter queries AM to retrieve the profile attributes of an authenticated user. If the SSO token presented in the request is missing or invalid, this filter returns an error.

Only profile attributes that are enabled in AM can be returned by the query. The data is made available to downstream IG filters and handlers, in the context UserProfileContext(5).

This filter is compatible with AM 5 and later.

Usage

{
  "name": string,
  "type": "UserProfileFilter",
  "config": {
    "amService": AmService reference,
    "ssoToken": runtime expression<string>,
    "profileAttributes": array of runtime expressions<string>
  }
}

Properties

"amService": AmService reference, required

The AmService heap object to use for the following properties:

  • url, the URL of an AM service to use for session token validation and authentication.

  • amHandler, the handler to use when communicating with AM to validate the token in the incoming request.

See also, AmService(5).

"ssoToken": runtime expressions<string>, optional

Location of the AM SSO token. For example, with ${request.headers['mySsoToken'].values[0]} the SSO token is the first value of the mySsoToken header in the request.

If an SSO token is not available in the request, an error is returned.

Default: ${request.cookies['AmService-ssoTokenHeader'][0].value}, where AmService-ssoTokenHeader is the name of the header or cookie where the AmService expects to find SSO tokens.

"profileAttributes": array of runtime expression<string>, optional

List of field names in AM to retrieve.

Field names are defined by the underlying repository in AM. For example, when AM is installed with the default configuration, the repository is ForgeRock Directory Server.

The following convenience accessors are provided for commonly used fields:

  • cn, retrieved through ${contexts.userProfile.commonName}

  • dn, retrieved through ${contexts.userProfile.distinguishedName}

  • realm, retrieved through ${contexts.userProfile.realm}

  • username, retrieved through ${contexts.userProfile.username}

All other available fields can be retrieved through ${contexts.userProfile.rawInfo} and ${contexts.userProfile.asJsonValue()}.

The username is always retrieved:

  • If profileAttributes is not configured, all fields are retrieved.

  • If profileAttributes is configured without specifying username, username is retrieved in addition to the specified fields.

Default: All available fields

Examples

Retrieving Specific Fields

In this snippet, the UserProfileFilter retrieves the username, dn, and cn from AM, and stores them in ${contexts.userProfile.username}, ${contexts.userProfile.distinguishedName}, and ${contexts.userProfile.commonName}:

{
  "name": "UserProfileFilter-1",
  "type": "UserProfileFilter",
  "config": {
    "amService": "AmService-1",
    "ssoToken": "${contexts.ssoToken.value}",
    "profileAttributes": [ "dn", "cn" ]
  }
}

Retrieving Raw Info As a Map

In this route, the UserProfileFilter retrieves all available user profile attributes from AM through the accessor rawInfo, and the StaticResponseHandler returns a selection of attributes:

{
  "name" : "user-profile",
  "baseURI" : "http://app.example.com:8081",
  "condition" : "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/user')}",
  "monitor" : false,
  "heap": [
    {
      "name" : "AmService-1",
      "type": "AmService",
      "config": {
        "url": "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam",
        "version" : "6.0"
      }
    }
  ],
  "handler" : {
    "type" : "Chain",
    "config" : {
      "filters" : [ {
        "name" : "SingleSignOnFilter-1",
        "type" : "SingleSignOnFilter",
        "config" : {
          "amService": "AmService-1"
        }
      }, {
        "name": "UserProfileFilter-1",
        "type": "UserProfileFilter",
        "config": {
          "amService": "AmService-1"
        }
      }
      ],
      "handler": {
        "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
        "config": {
          "status": 200,
          "entity": "<html><body>username: ${contexts.userProfile.username} <br><br>rawInfo: ${contexts.userProfile.rawInfo}</body></html>"
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

Data like the following is returned:

username: george
rawInfo: {
	_id = george,
	_rev = 279081243,
	username = george,
	realm = /,
	uid = [george],
	mail = [george @example.com],
	universalid = [id=george, ou=user, dc=openam, dc=forgerock, dc=org],
	employeeNumber = [123],
 ...
}

Decorators


Decorators are additional heap objects that let you extend what another object can do. For example, a CaptureDecorator extends the capability of filters and handlers to log requests and responses.

1.  Predefined Decorators

IG defines the following decorators: audit, baseURI, capture, and timer. You can use these decorators without configuring them explicitly.

2.  Guidelines for Naming Decorators

To prevent unwanted behavior, avoid naming decorators as follows:

  • For heap objects, avoid decorators named config, name, and type.

  • For routes, avoid decorators named auditService, baseURI, condition, globalDecorators, heap, handler, name, and session.

  • In config.json, avoid decorators named temporaryStorage.

  • In general, avoid decorators named comment or comments.

Use names that do not clash with field names for the decorated objects. The best way to avoid a clash is to avoid IG reserved field names, which include all purely alphanumeric field names. Instead use dots in your decorator names, such as my.decorator.

3.  Local, Route, and Global Decorators

IG applies decorations in this order:

  1. Local decoration - decorators declared on an object

  2. globalDecoration - decorators declared on a parent route are applied before decorators declared in the current route.

  3. Route decoration: decorators declared on a route handler

Decorations are inherited as follows:

  • Local decorations that are part of an object's declaration are inherited wherever the object is used.

  • The globalDecorations on a route are inherited on child routes.

To prevent loops, decorators themselves cannot be decorated. Instead, decorators apply only to specific types of objects such as filters and handlers.

Decorations can apply more than once. For example, if you set a decoration both on a route and also on an object defined within the route, then IG can apply the decoration twice. The following route results in the request being captured twice:

{
    "handler": {
        "type": "ReverseProxyHandler",
        "capture": "request"
    },
    "capture": "all"
}

3.1.  Decorating Individual Objects

To decorate individual objects, add the decorator's name value as a top-level field of the object, next to type and config.

3.2.  Decorating the Handler for a Route

To decorate the handler for a route, add the decorator as a top-level field of the route. The following route includes a timer decoration on the handler. This configuration decorates the ReverseProxyHandler only for the current route. It does not decorate other uses of ReverseProxyHandler in other routes:

{
    "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler",
    "timer": true
}

3.3.  Decorating All Objects in a Route's Heap

To decorate all applicable objects defined in a route's heap, configure globalDecorators as a top-level field of the Route. The globalDecorators field takes a map of the decorations to apply.

In the following example, the route has audit and capture decorations that apply to the Chain, HeaderFilter, and StaticResponseHandler. The decorations apply to all objects in this route's heap:

{
    "globalDecorators": {
        "timer": true,
        "capture": "all"
    },
    "handler": {
        "type": "Chain",
        "config": {
            "filters": [
                {
                    "type": "HeaderFilter",
                    "config": {
                        "messageType": "RESPONSE",
                        "add": [
                            {
                                "X-Powered-By": [
                                    "IG"
                                ]
                            }
                        ]
                    }
                }
            ],
            "handler": {
                "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
                "config": {
                    "status": 200,
                    "entity": "Hello World"
                }
            }
        }
    },
    "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/static')}"
}

3.4.  Decorating Individual Uses of a Named Filter or Handler

When a named filter or handler is configured in config.json or in the heap, it can be used many times in the configuration. To decorate each use of the filter or handler individually, use a delegate filter or handler, and decorate the delegate. In this way you can decorate the filter or handler differently each time you use it in the configuration.

{
    "filter or handler": {
        "type": "Delegate",
        "config": {
            "delegate": [object reference]
        },
        [decorator reference, ...]
    }
}

A delegate can be used to decorate a filter, a handler, or any other object type.

In the following example, an AmService heap object configures an amHandler to delegate tasks to ForgeRockClientHandler, and capture all requests and responses passing through the handler.

{
  "name": "AmService-1",
  "type": "AmService",
  "config": {
    "amHandler": {
      "type": "Delegate",
      "config": {
        "delegate": "ForgeRockClientHandler"
      },
      "capture": "all"
    },
    "url": "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam",
    "version": "6.0"
  }
}

For information about which filters can use the AmService heap object, see AmService(5).

You can use the same ForgeRockClientHandler in another part of the configuration, in a different route for example, without adding a capture decorator. Requests and responses that pass through that use of the handler are not captured.

Name

BaseUriDecorator — override scheme, host, and port of request URI

Description

Overrides the scheme, host, and port of the existing request URI, rebasing the URI and so making requests relative to a new base URI. Rebasing changes only the scheme, host, and port of the request URI. Rebasing does not affect the path, query string, or fragment.

Decorator Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "BaseUriDecorator"
}

A BaseUriDecorator does not have configurable properties.

IG creates a default BaseUriDecorator named baseURI at startup time in the top-level heap, so you can use baseURI as the decorator name without adding the decorator declaration explicitly.

Decorated Object Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": string,
    "config": object,
    decorator name: string
}
"name": string, required except for inline objects

The unique name of the object, just like an object that is not decorated

"type": string, required

The class name of the decorated object, which must be either a Filter or a Handler.

See also Filters and Handlers.

"config": object, required unless empty

The configuration of the object, just like an object that is not decorated

decorator name: string, required

A string representing the scheme, host, and port of the new base URI. The port is optional when using the defaults (80 for HTTP, 443 for HTTPS).

IG ignores this setting if the value is not a string.

Examples

Add a custom decorator to the heap named myBaseUri:

{
    "name": "myBaseUri",
    "type": "BaseUriDecorator"
}

Set a Router's base URI to https://www.example.com:8443:

{
    "name": "Router",
    "type": "Router",
    "myBaseUri": "https://www.example.com:8443/"
}

Name

CaptureDecorator — capture request and response messages

Description

Captures request and response messages for further analysis.

For information about how to set up capture in Studio, see Section 18.3, "Capturing Log Messages for Routes" in the Gateway Guide.

Decorator Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "CaptureDecorator",
    "config": {
        "captureEntity": boolean,
        "captureContext": boolean,
        "maxEntityLength": number
    }
}

Captured information is written to SLF4J logs, and named in this format:

org.forgerock.openig.decoration.capture.CaptureDecorator.<decoratorName>.<decoratedObjectName>

If the decorated object is not named, the object path is used in the log.

The decorator configuration has these properties:

"captureEntity": boolean, optional

Whether the message entity should be captured. The message entity is the body of the HTTP message, which can be a JSON document, XML, HTML, image, or other information.

The filter omits binary entities, instead writing a [binary entity] marker to the file.

Default: false

"captureContext": boolean, optional

Whether the context should be captured as JSON. The context chain is used when processing the request inside IG in the filters and handlers.

Default: false

"maxEntityLength": number, optional

The maximum number of bytes that can be captured for an entity. This property is used when captureEntity is true.

If the captured entity is bigger than maxEntityLength, everything up to maxEntityLength is captured, and an [entity truncated] message is written in the log.

Set maxEntityLength to be big enough to allow capture of normal entities, but small enough to prevent excessive memory use or OutOfMemoryError errors. Setting maxEntityLength to 2 GB or more causes an exception at startup.

Default: 524 288 bytes (512 KB)

Decorated Object Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": string,
    "config": object,
    decorator name: capture point(s)
}
"name": string, required except for inline objects

The unique name of the object, just like an object that is not decorated

"type": string, required

The class name of the decorated object, which must be either a Filter or a Handler.

See also Filters and Handlers.

"config": object, required unless empty

The configuration of the object, just like an object that is not decorated

decorator name: capture point(s), optional

The decorator name must match the name of the CaptureDecorator. For example, if the CaptureDecorator has "name": "capture", then decorator name is capture.

The capture point(s) are either a single string, or an array of strings. The strings are documented here in lowercase, but are not case-sensitive:

"all"

Capture at all available capture points

"request"

Capture the request as it enters the Filter or Handler

"filtered_request"

Capture the request as it leaves the Filter

Only applies to Filters

"response"

Capture the response as it enters the Filter or leaves the Handler

"filtered_response"

Capture the response as it leaves the Filter

Only applies to Filters

Examples

Decorator configured to log the entity:

{
    "name": "capture",
    "type": "CaptureDecorator",
    "config": {
        "captureEntity": true
    }
}

Decorator configured not to log the entity:

{
    "name": "capture",
    "type": "CaptureDecorator"
}

Decorator configured to log the context in JSON format, excluding the request and the response:

{
    "name": "capture",
    "type": "CaptureDecorator",
    "config": {
        "captureContext": true
    }
}

To capture requests and responses with the entity before sending the request and before returning the response, do so as in the following example:

{
    "heap": [
        {
            "name": "capture",
            "type": "CaptureDecorator",
            "config": {
                "captureEntity": true
            }
        },
        {
            "name": "ReverseProxyHandler",
            "type": "ReverseProxyHandler",
            "capture": [
                "request",
                "response"
            ]
        }
    ],
    "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
}

To capture all transformed requests and responses as they leave filters, decorate the Route as in the following example. This Route uses the default CaptureDecorator:

{
    "handler": {
        "type": "Chain",
        "config": {
            "filters": [
                {
                    "type": "HeaderFilter",
                    "config": {
                        "messageType": "REQUEST",
                        "add": {
                            "X-RequestHeader": [
                                "Capture at filtered_request point",
                                "And at filtered_response point"
                            ]
                        }
                    }
                },
                {
                    "type": "HeaderFilter",
                    "config": {
                        "messageType": "RESPONSE",
                        "add": {
                            "X-ResponseHeader": [
                                "Capture at filtered_response point"
                            ]
                        }
                    }
                }
            ],
            "handler": {
                "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
                "config": {
                    "status": 200,
                    "reason": "OK",
                    "entity": "<html><body><p>Hello, World!</p></body></html>"
                }
            }
        }
    },
    "capture": [
        "filtered_request",
        "filtered_response"
    ]
}

To capture the context as JSON, excluding the request and response, before sending the request and before returning the response, do so as in the following example:

{
    "heap": [
        {
            "name": "capture",
            "type": "CaptureDecorator",
            "config": {
                "captureContext": true
            }
        },
        {
            "name": "ReverseProxyHandler",
            "type": "ReverseProxyHandler",
            "capture": [
                "request",
                "response"
            ]
        }
    ],
    "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
}

Name

TimerDecorator — record times to process filters and handlers

Description

Records time in milliseconds to process filters and handlers. The following times are recorded:

  • For handlers, the total time to process the request and response.

  • For filters,

    • the total time to process the request and response,

    • the time to process the request and response inside the filter,

    • and the time to process the request and response in downstream filters and handlers.

Recorded information is written to SLF4J logs, and named in this format:

<className>.<decoratorName>.<decoratedObjectName>

If the decorated object is not named, the object path is used in the log.

Decorator Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "TimerDecorator",
    "config": {
        "timeUnit": string
    }
}

IG configures a default TimerDecorator named timer. You can use timer as the decorator name without explicitly declaring a decorator named timer.

"timeUnit": duration string, optional

Unit of time used in the decorator output. The unit of time can be any unit allowed in the duration field.

Default: ms

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

Decorated Object Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": string,
    "config": object,
    decorator name: boolean
}
"name": string, required except for inline objects

The unique name of the object, just like an object that is not decorated.

"type": string, required

The class name of the decorated object, which must be either a filter or a handler.

See also Filters and Handlers.

"config": object, required unless empty

The configuration of the object, just like an object that is not decorated.

decorator name: boolean, required

IG looks for the presence of the decorator name field for the TimerDecorator.

To activate the timer, set the value of the decorator name field to true.

To deactivate the TimerDecorator temporarily, set the value to false.

Examples

To Record Times For a ReverseProxyHandler

To record the elapsed time for operations traversing a ReverseProxyHandler, use a configuration like this:

{
    "handler": {
        "type": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    },
    "timer": true
}

This configuration could produce the following log message:

11:23:16:870 | INFO  | I/O dispatcher 2 | o.f.o.d.t.T.t.top-level-handler | Elapsed time: 5 ms

To Record Times for Individual Filters and Handlers

To record times spent for individual filters and handlers in a route, individually decorate each filter and handler in the route. Alternatively, configure globalDecorators in the top-level field of the route.

To Deactivate the Timers

To deactivate timer, set the value to false:

{
    "timer": false
}

Audit Framework


IG uses the ForgeRock common audit framework to log system boundary events using an implementation that is common across the ForgeRock platform.

Name

AuditService — enable common audit service for a route

Description

This object serves to configure the audit service for a route. The audit service uses the ForgeRock common audit event framework.

The route is decorated with an auditService field whose value references the configuration, either inline or from the heap.

Usage

{
  "name": string,
  "type": "AuditService",
  "config": {
    "config": object,
    "event-handlers": array
  }
}

Properties

"config": object, required

This object configures the audit service itself, rather than event handlers. If the configuration uses only default settings, you can omit the field instead of including an empty object as the field value.

The configuration object has the following fields:

"handlerForQueries": string, optional

This references the name of the event handler to use when querying audit event messages over REST.

"availableAuditEventHandlers": array of strings, optional

This lists fully qualified event handler class names for event handlers available to the audit service.

"caseInsensitiveFields": array of strings, optional

A list of audit event fields to be considered as case-insensitive for filtering. The fields are referenced using JSON pointer syntax. The list can be null or empty.

Default: Audit event fields are considered as case-sensitive for filtering.

"filterPolicies": object, optional

These policies indicate what fields and values to include and to exclude from audit event messages.

The filter policies object has these fields:

"field": object, optional

Audit event fields use JSON pointer notation, and are taken from the JSON schema for the audit event content.

Default: Include all fields.

The field object specifies which fields to include and to exclude:

"excludeIf": array of strings, optional

This holds a list of audit event fields to exclude.

"includeIf": array of strings, optional

This holds a list of audit event fields to include.

"value": object, optional

Default: Include all messages.

The value object specifies field values based on which messages are included and excluded:

"excludeIf": array of strings, optional

This holds a list of audit event field values.

When a value matches, the message is excluded.

"includeIf": array of strings, optional

This holds a list of audit event field values.

When a value matches, the message is included.

"event-handlers": array of configuration objects, required

This array of audit event handler configuration objects defines the event handlers that deal with audit events.

Each event handler configuration depends on type of the event handler.

Example

The following example configures an audit service to log access event messages in a comma-separated variable file, named /path/to/audit/logs/access.csv:

{
  "name": "AuditService",
  "type": "AuditService",
  "config": {
    "config": {},
    "event-handlers": [
      {
        "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.csv.CsvAuditEventHandler",
        "config": {
          "name": "csv",
          "logDirectory": "/path/to/audit/logs",
          "topics": [
            "access"
          ]
        }
      }
    ]
  }
}

The following example route uses the audit service:

{
  "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler",
  "auditService": "AuditService"
}

Name

CsvAuditEventHandler — log audit events to CSV format files

Description

An audit event handler that responds to events by logging messages to files in comma-separated variable (CSV) format.

The configuration is declared in an audit service configuration. For details, see AuditService(5).

Usage

{
    "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.csv.CsvAuditEventHandler",
    "config": {
        "name": string,
        "logDirectory": string,
        "topics": array,
        "enabled": boolean,
        "formatting": {
            "quoteChar": single-character string,
            "delimiterChar": single-character string,
            "endOfLineSymbols": string
        },
        "buffering": {
            "enabled": boolean,
            "autoFlush": boolean
        },
        "security": {
            "enabled": boolean,
            "filename": string,
            "password": string,
            "signatureInterval": duration
        },
        "fileRetention": {
            "maxDiskSpaceToUse": number,
            "maxNumberOfHistoryFiles": number,
            "minFreeSpaceRequired": number
        },
        "fileRotation": {
            "rotationEnabled": boolean,
            "maxFileSize": number,
            "rotationFilePrefix": string,
            "rotationFileSuffix": string,
            "rotationInterval": duration,
            "rotationTimes": array
        },
        "rotationRetentionCheckInterval": duration
    }
}

The values in this configuration object can use expressions as long as they resolve to the correct types for each field. For details about expressions, see Expressions(5).

Configuration

The "config" object has the following properties:

"name": string, required

The name of the event handler.

"logDirectory": string, required

The file system directory where log files are written.

"topics": array of strings, required

The topics that this event handler intercepts.

IG handles access events that occur at the system boundary, such as arrival of the initial request and departure of the final response.

Set this to "topics": [ "access" ].

"enabled": boolean, optional

Whether this event handler is active.

Default: true.

"formatting": object, optional

Formatting settings for CSV log files.

The formatting object has the following fields:

"quoteChar": single-character string, optional

The character used to quote CSV entries.

Default: ".

"delimiterChar": single-character string, optional

The character used to delimit CSV entries.

Default: ,.

"endOfLineSymbols": string, optional

The character or characters that separate a line.

Default: system-dependent line separator defined for the JVM.

"buffering": object, optional

Buffering settings for writing CSV log files. The default is for messages to be written to the log file for each event.

The buffering object has the following fields:

"enabled": boolean, optional

Whether log buffering is enabled.

Default: false.

"autoFlush": boolean, optional

Whether events are automatically flushed after being written.

Default: true.

"security": object, optional

Security settings for CSV log files. These settings govern tamper-evident logging, whereby messages are signed. By default tamper-evident logging is not enabled.

The security object has the following fields:

"enabled": boolean, optional

Whether tamper-evident logging is enabled.

Default: false.

Tamper-evident logging depends on a specially prepared keystore. For details, see "Preparing a Keystore for Tamper-Evident Logs".

"filename": string, required

File system path to the keystore containing the private key for tamper-evident logging.

The keystore must be a keystore of type JCEKS. For details, see "Preparing a Keystore for Tamper-Evident Logs".

"password": string, required

The password for the keystore for tamper-evident logging.

This password is used for the keystore and for private keys. For details, see "Preparing a Keystore for Tamper-Evident Logs".

"signatureInterval": duration, required

The time interval after which to insert a signature in the CSV file. This duration must not be zero, and must not be unlimited.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"fileRetention": object, optional

File retention settings for CSV log files.

The file retention object has the following fields:

"maxDiskSpaceToUse": number, optional

The maximum disk space in bytes the audit logs can occupy. A setting of 0 or less indicates that the policy is disabled.

Default: 0.

"maxNumberOfHistoryFiles": number, optional

The maximum number of historical log files to retain. A setting of -1 disables pruning of old history files.

Default: 0.

"minFreeSpaceRequired": number, optional

The minimum free space in bytes that the system must contain for logs to be written. A setting of 0 or less indicates that the policy is disabled.

Default: 0.

"fileRotation": object, optional

File rotation settings for log files.

The file rotation object has the following fields:

"rotationEnabled": configuration expression<boolean>, optional

Whether file rotation is enabled for log files.

Default: false.

"maxFileSize": configuration expression<number>, optional

The maximum file size of an audit log file in bytes. A setting of 0 or less indicates that the policy is disabled.

Default: 0.

"rotationFilePrefix": configuration expression<string>, optional

The prefix to add to a log file on rotation.

This has an effect when time-based file rotation is enabled.

"rotationFileSuffix": configuration expression<string>, optional

The suffix to add to a log file on rotation, possibly expressed in SimpleDateFormat.

This has an effect when time-based file rotation is enabled.

Default: -yyyy.MM.dd-HH.mm.ss, where yyyy characters are replaced with the year, MM characters are replaced with the month, dd characters are replaced with the day, HH characters are replaced with the hour (00-23), mm characters are replaced with the minute (00-60), and ss characters are replaced with the second (00-60).

"rotationInterval": duration, optional

The time interval after which to rotate log files. This duration must not be zero.

This has the effect of enabling time-based file rotation.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"rotationTimes": array of durations, optional

The durations, counting from midnight, after which to rotate files.

The following example schedules rotation six and twelve hours after midnight:

"rotationTimes": [ "6 hours", "12 hours" ]

This has the effect of enabling time-based file rotation.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"rotationRetentionCheckInterval": duration, optional

The time interval after which to check file rotation and retention policies for updates.

Default: 5 seconds

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

Preparing a Keystore for Tamper-Evident Logs

Tamper-evident logging depends on a public key/private key pair and on a secret key that are stored together in a JCEKS keystore. Follow these steps to prepare the keystore:

  1. Generate a key pair in the keystore.

    The CSV event handler expects a JCEKS-type keystore with a key alias of Signature for the signing key, where the key is generated with the RSA key algorithm and the SHA256withRSA signature algorithm:

    $ keytool \
     -genkeypair \
     -keyalg RSA \
     -sigalg SHA256withRSA \
     -alias "signature" \
     -dname "CN=openig.example.com,O=Example Corp,C=FR" \
     -keystore /path/to/audit-keystore \
     -storetype JCEKS \
     -storepass password \
     -keypass password
        

    Note

    Because KeyStore converts all characters in its key aliases to lower case, use only lowercase in alias definitions of a KeyStore.

  2. Generate a secret key in the keystore.

    The CSV event handler expects a JCEKS-type keystore with a key alias of Password for the symmetric key, where the key is generated with the HmacSHA256 key algorithm and 256-bit key size:

    $ keytool \
     -genseckey \
     -keyalg HmacSHA256 \
     -keysize 256 \
     -alias "password" \
     -keystore /path/to/audit-keystore \
     -storetype JCEKS \
     -storepass password \
     -keypass password
        
  3. Verify the content of the keystore:

    $ keytool \
     -list \
     -keystore /path/to/audit-keystore \
     -storetype JCEKS \
     -storepass password
    
    Keystore type: JCEKS
    Keystore provider: SunJCE
    
    Your keystore contains 2 entries
    
    signature, Nov 27, 2015, PrivateKeyEntry,
    Certificate fingerprint (SHA1): 4D:CF:CC:29:...:8B:6E:68:D1
    password, Nov 27, 2015, SecretKeyEntry,
    
        

Example

For instructions on recording audit events in a CSV file, see Procedure 15.1, "To Record Audit Events in a CSV File" in the Gateway Guide.

The following example configures a CSV audit event handler to write a log file, /path/to/audit/logs/access.csv, that is signed every 10 seconds to make it tamper-evident:

{
    "name": "csv",
    "topics": [
        "access"
    ],
    "logDirectory": "/path/to/audit/logs/",
    "security": {
        "enabled": "true",
        "filename": "/path/to/audit-keystore",
        "password": "password",
        "signatureInterval": "10 seconds"
    }
}

Name

ElasticsearchAuditEventHandler — log audit events in the Elasticsearch search and analytics engine

Description

An audit event handler that responds to events by logging messages in the Elasticsearch search and analytics engine.

The configuration is declared in an audit service configuration. For information, see AuditService(5).

For Elasticsearch downloads and installation instructions, see the Elasticsearch Getting Started document.

A special client handler called ElasticsearchClientHandler can be defined to send audit events to Elasticsearch. You can use this client handler to capture the exchange between the audit service and Elasticsearch, or to wrap the search with a filter, for example, the OAuth2ClientFilter.

To define an ElasticsearchClientHandler, create the following object in the heap for the Elasticsearch audit event handler

{
  "name": "ElasticsearchClientHandler",
  "type": "ClientHandler",
  "config": {},
}

Usage

{
  "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.elasticsearch.ElasticsearchAuditEventHandler",
  "config": {
    "name": configuration expression<string>,
    "topics" : [ configuration expression<string>, ... ],
    "connection" : {
      "host" : configuration expression<string>,
      "port" : configuration expression<number>,
      "useSSL" : configuration expression<boolean>,
      "username" : configuration expression<string>,
      "password" : configuration expression<string>
    },
    "indexMapping" : {
      "indexName" : configuration expression<string>
    },
    "buffering" : {
      "enabled" : configuration expression<boolean>,
      "writeInterval" : configuration expression<duration>,
      "maxSize" : configuration expression<number>,
      "maxBatchedEvents" : configuration expression<number>
    }
  }
}

The values in this configuration object can use expressions if they resolve to the correct types for each field. For information about expressions, see Expressions(5).

Properties

The "config" object has the following properties:

"name": configuration expression<string>, required

The name of the event handler.

"topics": array of configuration expressions<string>, required

The topics that this event handler intercepts.

IG handles access events that occur at the system boundary, such as arrival of the initial request and departure of the final response.

Set this to "topics": [ "access" ].

"connection": object, optional

Connection settings for sending messages to Elasticsearch. If this object is not configured, it takes default values for its fields. This object has the following fields:

"host": configuration expression<string>, optional

Hostname or IP address of Elasticsearch.

Default: localhost

"port": configuration expression<number>, optional

The port used by Elasticsearch. The value must be between 0 and 65535.

Default: 9200

"useSSL": configuration expression<boolean>, optional

Setting to use or not use SSL/TLS to connect to Elasticsearch.

Default: false

"username": configuration expression<string>, optional

Username when basic authentication is enabled through Elasticsearch Shield.

"password": configuration expression<string>, optional

Password when basic authentication is enabled through Elasticsearch Shield.

"indexMapping": object, optional

Defines how an audit event and its fields are stored and indexed.

"indexName": configuration expression<string>, optional

The index name. Set this parameter if the default name audit conflicts with an existing Elasticsearch index.

Default: audit.

"buffering": object, optional

Settings for buffering events and batch writes.

"enabled": configuration expression<boolean>, optional

Setting to use or not use log buffering.

Default: false.

"writeInterval": configuration expression<duration>

The interval at which to send buffered event messages to Elasticsearch. If buffering is enabled, this interval must be greater than 0.

Default: 1 second

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"maxBatchedEvents": configuration expression<number>, optional

The maximum number of event messages in a batch write to Elasticsearch for each writeInterval.

Default: 500

"maxSize": configuration expression<number>, optional

The maximum number of event messages in the queue of buffered event messages.

Default: 10000

Example

In the following example, an Elasticsearch audit event handler logs audit events for access. For an example of setting up and testing this configuration, see Procedure 15.2, "To Record Audit Events in Elasticsearch" in the Gateway Guide.

{
  "name": "30-elasticsearch",
  "baseURI": "http://app.example.com:8081",
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/audit')}",
  "monitor": false,
  "auditService": {
    "name": "AuditService",
    "type": "AuditService",
    "config": {
      "event-handlers": [
        {
          "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.elasticsearch.ElasticsearchAuditEventHandler",
          "config": {
            "name": "elasticsearch",
            "indexMapping": {
              "indexName": "audit"
            },
            "connection": {
              "host": "localhost",
              "port": 9200,
              "useSSL": false
            },
            "topics": [
              "access"
            ]
          }
        }
      ]
    }
  },
  "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
}

Name

JdbcAuditEventHandler — log audit events to relational database

Description

An audit event handler that responds to events by logging messages to an appropriately configured relational database table.

The configuration is declared in an audit service configuration. For details, see AuditService(5).

Usage

{
    "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.jdbc.JdbcAuditEventHandler",
    "config": {
        "name": string,
        "topics": array,
        "databaseType": string,
        "enabled": boolean,
        "buffering": {
            "enabled": boolean,
            "writeInterval": duration,
            "autoFlush": boolean,
            "maxBatchedEvents": number,
            "maxSize": number,
            "writerThreads": number
        },
        "connectionPool": {
            "dataSourceClassName": string,
            "jdbcUrl": string,
            "username": string,
            "password": string,
            "autoCommit": boolean,
            "connectionTimeout": number,
            "idleTimeout": number,
            "maxLifetime": number,
            "minIdle": number,
            "maxPoolSize": number,
            "poolName": string
        },
        "tableMappings": [
            {
                "event": string,
                "table": string,
                "fieldToColumn": {
                    "event-field": "database-column"
                }
            }
        ]
    }
}

The values in this configuration object can use expressions as long as they resolve to the correct types for each field. For details about expressions, see Expressions(5).

Configuration

The "config" object has the following properties:

"name": string, required

The name of the event handler.

"topics": array of strings, required

The topics that this event handler intercepts.

IG handles access events that occur at the system boundary, such as arrival of the initial request and departure of the final response.

Set this to "topics": [ "access" ].

"databaseType": string, required

The database type name.

Built-in support is provided for oracle, mysql, and h2. Unrecognized database types rely on a GenericDatabaseStatementProvider.

"enabled": boolean, optional

Whether this event handler is active.

Default: true.

"buffering": object, optional

Buffering settings for sending messages to the database. The default is for messages to be written to the log file for each event.

The buffering object has the following fields:

"enabled": boolean, optional

Whether log buffering is enabled.

Default: false.

"writeInterval": duration, required

The interval at which to send buffered event messages to the database.

This interval must be greater than 0 if buffering is enabled.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"autoFlush": boolean, optional

Whether the events are automatically flushed after being written.

Default: true.

"maxBatchedEvents": number, optional

The maximum number of event messages batched into a PreparedStatement.

Default: 100.

"maxSize": number, optional

The maximum size of the queue of buffered event messages.

Default: 5000.

"writerThreads": number, optional

The number of threads to write buffered event messages to the database.

Default: 1.

"connectionPool": object, required

Connection pool settings for sending messages to the database.

The connection pool object has the following fields:

"dataSourceClassName": string, optional

The class name of the data source for the database.

"jdbcUrl": string, required

The JDBC URL to connect to the database.

"username": string, required

The username identifier for the database user with access to write the messages.

"password": number, optional

The password for the database user with access to write the messages.

"autoCommit": boolean, optional

Whether to commit transactions automatically when writing messages.

Default: true.

"connectionTimeout": number, optional

The number of milliseconds to wait for a connection from the pool before timing out.

Default: 30000.

"idleTimeout": number, optional

The number of milliseconds to allow a database connection to remain idle before timing out.

Default: 600000.

"maxLifetime": number, optional

The number of milliseconds to allow a database connection to remain in the pool.

Default: 1800000.

"minIdle": number, optional

The minimum number of idle connections in the pool.

Default: 10.

"maxPoolSize": number, optional

The maximum number of connections in the pool.

Default: 10.

"poolName": string, optional

The name of the connection pool.

"tableMappings": array of objects, required

Table mappings for directing event content to database table columns.

A table mappings object has the following fields:

"event": string, required

The audit event that the table mapping is for.

Set this to access.

"table": string, required

The name of the database table that corresponds to the mapping.

"fieldToColumn": object, required

This object maps the names of audit event fields to database columns, where the keys and values are both strings.

Audit event fields use JSON pointer notation, and are taken from the JSON schema for the audit event content.

Example

The following example configures a JDBC audit event handler using a local MySQL database, writing to a table named auditaccess:

{
    "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.jdbc.JdbcAuditEventHandler",
    "config": {
        "databaseType": "mysql",
        "name": "jdbc",
        "topics": [
            "access"
        ],
        "connectionPool": {
            "jdbcUrl": "jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/audit?allowMultiQueries=true&characterEncoding=utf8",
            "username": "audit",
            "password": "audit"
        },
        "tableMappings": [
            {
                "event": "access",
                "table": "auditaccess",
                "fieldToColumn": {
                    "_id": "id",
                    "timestamp": "timestamp_",
                    "eventName": "eventname",
                    "transactionId": "transactionid",
                    "userId": "userid",
                    "trackingIds": "trackingids",
                    "server/ip": "server_ip",
                    "server/port": "server_port",
                    "client/host": "client_host",
                    "client/ip": "client_ip",
                    "client/port": "client_port",
                    "request/protocol": "request_protocol",
                    "request/operation": "request_operation",
                    "request/detail": "request_detail",
                    "http/request/secure": "http_request_secure",
                    "http/request/method": "http_request_method",
                    "http/request/path": "http_request_path",
                    "http/request/queryParameters": "http_request_queryparameters",
                    "http/request/headers": "http_request_headers",
                    "http/request/cookies": "http_request_cookies",
                    "http/response/headers": "http_response_headers",
                    "response/status": "response_status",
                    "response/statusCode": "response_statuscode",
                    "response/elapsedTime": "response_elapsedtime",
                    "response/elapsedTimeUnits": "response_elapsedtimeunits"
                }
            }
        ]
    }
}

Examples including statements to create tables are provided in the JDBC handler library, forgerock-audit-handler-jdbc-version.jar, that is built into the IG .war file. Unpack the library, then find the examples under the db/ folder.


Name

JmsAuditEventHandler — record messages between a JMS message broker and clients

Description

The Java Message Service (JMS) is a Java API for sending asynchronous messages between clients. It wraps audit events in JMS messages and publishes them in a JMS broker, which then delivers the messages to the appropriate destination.

The JMS API architecture includes a JMS provider and JMS clients, and supports the publish/subscribe messaging pattern. For more information, see Basic JMS API Concepts.

The JMS audit event handler does not support queries. To support queries, also enable a second handler that supports queries.

The ForgeRock JMS audit event handler supports JMS communication, based on the following components:

  • JMS message broker, to provide clients with connectivity, message storage, and message delivery functionality.

  • JMS messages, which follow the format in "Example".

  • Destinations, maintained by a message broker. A destination can be a JMS topic, using publish/subscribe to take the ForgeRock JSON for an audit event, wrap it into a JMS TextMessage, and send it to the broker.

  • JMS clients, to produce and/or receive JMS messages.

Depending on the configuration, some or all of these components are included in JMS audit log messages.

Important

The example in this section is based on Apache ActiveMQ, but you can choose a different JMS message broker.

Make sure that the .jar files required by the JMS message broker are available in the IG web container.

Declare the configuration in an audit service, as described in AuditService(5). To define an JmsAuditEventHandler, create the following object in the heap:

{
  "name": string,
  "type": "AuditService",
  "config": {},
}

Usage

{
  "type": "AuditService",
  "config": {
    "config": {},
    "event-handlers": [
    {
      "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.jms.JmsAuditEventHandler",
      "config": {
        "name": string,
        "topics": array of strings,
        "deliveryMode": string,
        "sessionMode": string,
        "jndi": {
          "contextProperties": map,
          "topicName": string,
          "connectionFactoryName": string
        }
      }
    }]
  }
}

The values in this configuration object can use configuration expressions, as described in "Configuration and Runtime Expressions".

Configuration

For a full list of properties in the "config" object, see Configuration Properties for the JMS Audit Event Handler in the IDM Integrator's Guide.

"name": string, required

The name of the event handler.

"topics": array of strings, required

The topics that this event handler intercepts.

IG handles access events that occur at the system boundary, such as arrival of the initial request and departure of the final response.

Set this to "topics": [ "access" ].

"deliveryMode": string, required

Delivery mode for messages from a JMS provider. Set to PERSISTENT or NON_PERSISTENT.

"sessionMode": string, required

Acknowledgement mode in sessions without transactions. Set to AUTO, CLIENT, or DUPS_OK.

"contextProperties": map, optional

Settings with which to populate the initial context.

The following properties are required when ActiveMQ is used as the message broker:

  • java.naming.factory.initial

    For example, "org.apache.activemq.jndi.ActiveMQInitialContextFactory".

    To substitute a different JNDI message broker, change the JNDI context properties.

  • java.naming.provider.url

    For example, "tcp://127.0.0.1:61616".

    To configure the message broker on a remote system, substitute the associated IP address.

    To set up SSL, set up keystores and truststores, and change the value of the java.naming.provider.url to:

    ssl://127.0.0.1:61617?daemon=true&socket.enabledCipherSuites=SSL_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA,SSL_DH_anon_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA

  • topic.audit

    For example, "audit".

To use the JMS resources provided by your application server, leave this field empty. The values for topicName and connectionFactoryName are then JNDI names that depend on the configuration of your application server.

"topicName": string, required

JNDI lookup name for the JMS topic.

For ActiveMQ, this property must be consistent with the value of topic.audit in contextProperties.

"connectionFactoryName": string, required

JNDI lookup name for the JMS connection factory.

Example

In the following example, a JMS audit event handler delivers audit events in batches. The handler is configured to use the ActiveMQ JNDI message broker, on port 61616. For an example of setting up and testing this configuration, see Procedure 15.4, "To Record Audit Events With a JMS Audit Event Handler" in the Gateway Guide.

{
  "MyCapture" : "all",
  "auditService" : {
    "config" : {
      "event-handlers" : [
        {
          "class" : "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.jms.JmsAuditEventHandler",
          "config" : {
            "name" : "jms",
            "topics" : [ "access" ],
            "deliveryMode" : "NON_PERSISTENT",
            "sessionMode" : "AUTO",
            "jndi" : {
              "contextProperties" : {
                "java.naming.factory.initial" : "org.apache.activemq.jndi.ActiveMQInitialContextFactory",
                "java.naming.provider.url" : "tcp://openam.example.com:61616",
                "topic.audit" : "audit"
              },
              "topicName" : "audit",
              "connectionFactoryName" : "ConnectionFactory"
            }
          }
        }
      ],
      "config" : { }
    },
    "type" : "AuditService"
  },
  "handler" : {
    "type" : "StaticResponseHandler",
    "config" : {
      "status" : 200,
      "headers" : {
        "content-type" : [ "text/plain" ]
      },
      "reason" : "found",
      "entity" : "Message from audited route"
    }
  },
  "monitor" : true,
  "condition" : "${request.uri.path == '/activemq_event_handler'}"
}

The following code shows an example message produced by the JMS audit event handler.

{
  "auditTopic": "access",
  "event": {
    "eventName": "OPENIG-HTTP-ACCESS",
    "timestamp": "2016-11-28T14:39:30.004Z",
    "transactionId": "882918f9-f7c3-47ee-9f87-5e3cfcfb98be-37",
    "server": {
      "ip": "0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1",
      "port": 8080
    },
    "client": {
      "ip": "0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1",
      "port": 56095
    },
    "http": {
      "request": {
        "secure": false,
        "method": "GET",
        "path": "http://openig.example.com:8080/activemq_event_handler",
        "queryParameters": {},
        "headers": {
          "accept": ["*/*"],
          "accept-encoding": ["gzip, deflate"],
          "Connection": ["keep-alive"],
          "host": ["openig.example.com:8080"],
          "user-agent": ["python-requests/2.9.1"]
        },
        "cookies": {}
      },
      "response": {
        "headers": {
          "Content-Length": ["26"],
          "Content-Type": ["text/plain"]
        }
      }
    },
    "response": {
      "status": "SUCCESSFUL",
      "statusCode": "200",
      "elapsedTime": 73,
      "elapsedTimeUnits": "MILLISECONDS"
    },
    "_id": "882918f9-f7c3-47ee-9f87-5e3cfcfb98be-38"
  }
}

Name

JsonAuditEventHandler — log events as JSON objects to a set of JSON files

Description

The JSON audit event handler logs events as JSON objects to a set of JSON files. This is the preferred file-based audit event handler.

Declare the configuration in an audit service, as described in AuditService(5). To define an JsonAuditEventHandler, create the following object in the heap:

{
  "name": runtime expression<string>,
  "type": "AuditService",
  "config": {},
}

Usage

{
  "type": "AuditService",
  "config": {
    "config": {},
    "event-handlers": [
    {
      "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.json.JsonAuditEventHandler",
      "config": {
        "name": runtime expression<string>,
        "topics": array of runtime expressions<string>,
        "logDirectory" : expression,
        "elasticsearchCompatible" : runtime expression<boolean>,
        "fileRotation": {
            "rotationEnabled": runtime expression<boolean>,
            "maxFileSize": runtime expression<number>,
            "rotationFilePrefix": runtime expression<string>,
            "rotationFileSuffix": runtime expression<string>,
            "rotationInterval": runtime expression<duration>,
            "rotationTimes": array of runtime expressions<duration>
        },
        "fileRetention": {
            "maxNumberOfHistoryFiles": runtime expression<number>,
            "maxDiskSpaceToUse": runtime expression<number>,
            "minFreeSpaceRequired": runtime expression<number>,
            "rotationRetentionCheckInterval": runtime expression<duration>
        },
        "buffering" : {
          "writeInterval" : runtime expression<duration>,
          "maxSize" : runtime expression<number>
        }
      }
    }]
  }
}

Configuration

"name": runtime expression<string>, required

The name of the event handler.

"topics": array of runtime expressions<string>, required

The topics that this event handler intercepts.

IG handles access events that occur at the system boundary, such as arrival of the initial request and departure of the final response.

Set this to "topics": [ "access" ].

"logDirectory": runtime expression<string>, required

The file system directory where log files are written.

elasticsearchCompatible: boolean true or false, optional

Set to true to enable compatibility with ElasticSearch JSON format. For more information, see the ElasticSearch documentation.

Default: false

"fileRotation": object, optional

File rotation settings for log files.

The file rotation object has the following fields:

"rotationEnabled": configuration expression<boolean>, optional

Whether file rotation is enabled for log files.

Default: false.

"maxFileSize": configuration expression<number>, optional

The maximum file size of an audit log file in bytes. A setting of 0 or less indicates that the policy is disabled.

Default: 0.

"rotationFilePrefix": configuration expression<string>, optional

The prefix to add to a log file on rotation.

This has an effect when time-based file rotation is enabled.

"rotationFileSuffix": configuration expression<string>, optional

The suffix to add to a log file on rotation, possibly expressed in SimpleDateFormat.

This has an effect when time-based file rotation is enabled.

Default: -yyyy.MM.dd-HH.mm.ss, where yyyy characters are replaced with the year, MM characters are replaced with the month, dd characters are replaced with the day, HH characters are replaced with the hour (00-23), mm characters are replaced with the minute (00-60), and ss characters are replaced with the second (00-60).

"rotationInterval": duration, optional

The time interval after which to rotate log files. This duration must not be zero.

This has the effect of enabling time-based file rotation.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"rotationTimes": array of durations, optional

The durations, counting from midnight, after which to rotate files.

The following example schedules rotation six and twelve hours after midnight:

"rotationTimes": [ "6 hours", "12 hours" ]

This has the effect of enabling time-based file rotation.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"fileRetention": object, optional

File retention settings for log files.

The file retention object has the following fields:

"maxNumberOfHistoryFiles": configuration expression<number>, optional

The maximum number of historical audit files that can be stored. If the number exceeds this maximum, older files are deleted. A value of -1 disables purging of old log files.

Default: 0.

"maxDiskSpaceToUse": runtime expression<number>, optional

The maximum disk space in bytes that can be used for audit files. If the audit files use more than this space, older files are deleted. A negative or zero value indicates that this policy is disabled, and historical audit files can use unlimited disk space.

"minFreeSpaceRequired": runtime expression<string>, optional

The minimum free disk space in bytes required on the system that houses the audit files. If the free space drops below this minimum, older files are deleted. A negative or zero value indicates that this policy is disabled, and no minimum space requirements apply.

"rotationRetentionCheckInterval": runtime expression<string>, optional

Interval at which to periodically check file rotation and retention policies. The interval must be a duration, for example, 5 seconds, 5 minutes, or 5 hours.

"buffering": object, optional

Settings for buffering events and batch writes.

"writeInterval": duration

The interval at which to send buffered event messages to Elasticsearch. If buffering is enabled, this interval must be greater than 0.

Default: 1 second

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"maxSize": number, optional

The maximum number of event messages in the queue of buffered event messages.

Default: 10000

Example

In the following example, a JSON audit event handler logs audit events for access. For an example of setting up and testing this configuration, see Section 15.4, "Recording Audit Events in JSON" in the Gateway Guide.

{
  "name": "30-json",
  "baseURI": "http://app.example.com:8081",
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/audit')}",
  "monitor": false,
  "auditService": {
    "name": "AuditService",
    "type": "AuditService",
    "config": {
      "event-handlers": [
        {
          "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.json.JsonAuditEventHandler",
          "config": {
            "name": "json",
            "logDirectory": "/tmp/logs",
            "elasticsearchCompatible": false,
            "topics": [
              "access"
            ],
            "buffering": {
              "maxSize": 100000,
              "writeInterval": "100 ms"
            },
            "rotationRetentionCheckInterval": "1 m"
          }
        }
      ]
    }
  },
  "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
}

Name

SyslogAuditEventHandler — log audit events to the system log

Description

An audit event handler that responds to events by logging messages to the UNIX system log as governed by RFC 5424, The Syslog Protocol.

The configuration is declared in an audit service configuration. For details, see AuditService(5).

Usage

{
    "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.syslog.SyslogAuditEventHandler",
    "config": {
        "name": string,
        "topics": array,
        "protocol": string,
        "host": string,
        "port": number,
        "connectTimeout": number,
        "facility": "string",
        "buffering": {
            "enabled": boolean,
            "maxSize": number
        },
        "severityFieldMappings": [
            {
                "topic": string,
                "field": string,
                "valueMappings": {
                    "field-value": "syslog-severity"
                }
            }
        ]
    }
}

The values in this configuration object can use expressions as long as they resolve to the correct types for each field. For details about expressions, see Expressions(5).

Configuration

The "config" object has the following properties:

"name": string, required

The name of the event handler.

"topics": array of strings, required

The topics that this event handler intercepts.

IG handles access events that occur at the system boundary, such as arrival of the initial request and departure of the final response.

Set this to "topics": [ "access" ].

"protocol": string, required

The transport protocol used to send event messages to the Syslog daemon.

Set this to TCP for Transmission Control Protocol, or to UDP for User Datagram Protocol.

"host": string, required

The hostname of the Syslog daemon to which to send event messages. The hostname must resolve to an IP address.

"port": number, required

The port of the Syslog daemon to which to send event messages.

The value must be between 0 and 65535.

"connectTimeout": number, required when using TCP

The number of milliseconds to wait for a connection before timing out.

"facility": string, required

The Syslog facility to use for event messages.

Set this to one of the following values:

kern

Kernel messages

user

User-level messages

mail

Mail system

daemon

System daemons

auth

Security/authorization messages

syslog

Messages generated internally by syslogd

lpr

Line printer subsystem

news

Network news subsystem

uucp

UUCP subsystem

cron

Clock daemon

authpriv

Security/authorization messages

ftp

FTP daemon

ntp

NTP subsystem

logaudit

Log audit

logalert

Log alert

clockd

Clock daemon

local0

Local use 0

local1

Local use 1

local2

Local use 2

local3

Local use 3

local4

Local use 4

local5

Local use 5

local6

Local use 6

local7

Local use 7

"buffering": object, optional

Buffering settings for writing to the system log facility. The default is for messages to be written to the log for each event.

The buffering object has the following fields:

"enabled": boolean, optional

Whether log buffering is enabled.

Default: false.

"maxSize": number, optional

The maximum number of buffered event messages.

Default: 5000.

"severityFieldMappings": object, optional

Severity field mappings set the correspondence between audit event fields and Syslog severity values.

The severity field mappings object has the following fields:

"topic": string, required

The audit event topic to which the mapping applies.

Set this to access.

"field": string, required

The audit event field to which the mapping applies.

Audit event fields use JSON pointer notation, and are taken from the JSON schema for the audit event content.

"valueMappings": object, required

The map of audit event values to Syslog severities, where both the keys and the values are strings.

Syslog severities are one of the following values:

emergency

System is unusable.

alert

Action must be taken immediately.

critical

Critical conditions.

error

Error conditions.

warning

Warning conditions.

notice

Normal but significant condition.

informational

Informational messages.

debug

Debug-level messages.

Example

The following example configures a Syslog audit event handler that writes to the system log daemon on syslogd.example.com, port 6514 over TCP with a timeout of 30 seconds. The facility is the first one for local use, and response status is mapped to Syslog informational messages:

{
    "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.syslog.SyslogAuditEventHandler",
    "config": {
        "protocol": "TCP",
        "host": "https://syslogd.example.com",
        "port": 6514,
        "connectTimeout": 30000,
        "facility": "local0",
        "severityFieldMappings": [
            {
                "topic": "access",
                "field": "response/status",
                "valueMappings": {
                    "FAILED": "INFORMATIONAL",
                    "SUCCESSFUL": "INFORMATIONAL"
                }
            }
        ]
    }
}

Name

SplunkAuditEvenHandler — log events to a Splunk system

Description

The Splunk audit event handler logs IG events to a Splunk system. For an example of setting up and testing Splunk, see Section 15.5, "Recording Audit Events in Splunk" in the Gateway Guide.

Declare the configuration in an audit service, as described in AuditService(5). To define an SplunkAuditEvenHandler, create the following object in the heap:

{
  "name": string,
   "type": "AuditService",
   "config": {},
}

Usage

{
  "type": "AuditService",
  "config": {
    "config": {},
    "event-handlers": [
    {
      "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.splunk.SplunkAuditEventHandler",
      "config": {
        "name" : string,
        "topics" : array of strings,
        "enabled" : boolean
        "connection" : {
            "useSSL" : boolean,
            "host" : string,
            "port" : number
        },
        "buffering" : {
            "maxSize" : number,
            "writeInterval" : duration,
            "maxBatchedEvents" : number
        },
        "authzToken" : string,
    }
}

The values in this configuration object can use configuration expressions, as described in "Configuration and Runtime Expressions".

Configuration

"name": string, required

The name of the event handler.

"topics": array of strings, required

The topics that this event handler intercepts.

IG handles access events that occur at the system boundary, such as arrival of the initial request and departure of the final response.

Set this to "topics": [ "access" ].

"enabled": boolean expression, required

Specifies whether this audit event handler is enabled.

"connection": object, optional

Connection settings for sending messages to the Splunk system. If this object is not configured, it takes default values for its fields. This object has the following fields:

"useSSL": boolean, optional

Specifies whether IG should connect to the audit event handler instance over SSL.

Default: false

"host": string, optional

Hostname or IP address of the Splunk system.

Default: localhost

"port": number, optional

The dedicated Splunk port for HTTP input.

Before you install Splunk, make sure that this port is free. Otherwise, change the port number in Splunk and in the IG routes that use Splunk.

Default: 8088

"buffering": object, optional

Settings for buffering events and batch writes. If this object is not configured, it takes default values for its fields. This object has the following fields:

"maxSize": number, optional

The maximum number of event messages in the queue of buffered event messages.

Default: 10000

"maxBatchedEvents": number, optional

The maximum number of event messages in a batch write to this event handler for each writeInterval.

Default: 500

"writeInterval": duration

The delay after which the writer thread is scheduled to run after encountering an empty event buffer.

Default: 100 ms (units of 'ms' or 's' are recommended)

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"authzToken": string, required

The authorization token associated with the configured HTTP event collector.

Example

In the following example, IG events are logged to a Splunk system.

{
  "handler": {
    "type": "StaticResponseHandler",
    "config": {
      "status": 200,
      "entity": "Creating Splunk Audit Event"
    }
  },
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/splunk')}",
  "auditService": {
    "type": "AuditService",
    "config": {
      "config": {},
      "event-handlers": [
        {
          "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.splunk.SplunkAuditEventHandler",
          "config": {
            "name": "splunk",
            "topics": [
              "access"
            ],
            "enabled": true,
            "connection": {
              "useSSL": false,
              "host": "localhost",
              "port": 8088
            },
            "buffering": {
              "maxSize": 10000,
              "writeInterval": "100 ms",
              "maxBatchedEvents": 500
            },
            "authzToken": "<splunk-authorization-token>"
          }
        }
      ]
    }
  }
}

For an example of setting up and testing this configuration, see Section 15.5, "Recording Audit Events in Splunk" in the Gateway Guide.

Monitoring


This section describes monitoring metrics exposed by IG. For information about the monitoring endpoints used in IG, and examples of how to set up monitoring, see Chapter 16, "Monitoring" in the Gateway Guide.

Name

Monitoring Data Types — data types used in monitoring

This section describes the data types used in monitoring:

Counter

Cumulative metric for a numerical value that only increases.

Gauge

Metric for a numerical value that can increase or decrease.

Summary

Metric that samples observations, providing a count of observations, sum total of observed amounts, average rate of events, and moving average rates across a sliding time window.

The Prometheus view does not provide time-based statistics, as rates can be calculated from the time-series data. Instead, the Prometheus view includes summary metrics whose names have the following suffixes or labels:

  • _count: number of events recorded

  • _total: sum of the amounts of events recorded

  • {quantile="0.5"}: 50% at or below this value

  • {quantile="0.75"}: 75% at or below this value

  • {quantile="0.95"}: 95% at or below this value

  • {quantile="0.98"}: 98% at or below this value

  • {quantile="0.99"}: 99% at or below this value

  • {quantile="0.999"}: 99.9% at or below this value

Timer

Metric combining time-series summary statistics.

Common REST views show summaries as JSON objects. JSON summaries have the following fields:

{
 "count": number,                                     // events recorded for this metric
 "total": number,                                     // sum of the durations of events recorded
                                                      // for this metric
 "mean_rate": number,                                 // average rate
 "m1_rate": number,                                   // one-minute average rate
 "m5_rate": number,                                   // five-minute average rate
 "m15_rate": number,                                  // fifteen-minute average rate
 "mean": number,                                      // total/count, or 0 if count is 0
 "min": number,                                       // minimum duration recorded
 "max": number,                                       // maximum duration recorded
 "stddev": number,                                    // standard deviation of recorded durations
 "p50": number,                                       // 50% at or below this value
 "p75": number,                                       // 75% at or below this value
 "p95": number,                                       // 95% at or below this value
 "p98": number,                                       // 98% at or below this value
 "p99": number,                                       // 99% at or below this value
 "p999": number,                                      // 99.9% at or below this value
 "p9999": number,                                     // 99.99% at or below this value
 "p99999": number,                                    // 99.999% at or below this value
}

Name

Monitoring — Metrics

This section describes the metrics by name or name pattern, used by the Prometheus Scrape Endpoint and Forgerock Common REST Monitoring Endpoint.

Unless stated otherwise, metrics apply to the IG components and routes.

Router metrics

The router publishes a single metric that indicates the number of routes deployed in this router.

Prometheus Scrape Endpoint Metrics

Metric: ig_router_deployed_routes (type: gauge)

This metric has the following labels:

  • fully_qualified_name: fully qualified name of the router, such as gateway.main-router

  • heap: name of the heap in which this router is declared, such as gateway

  • name: simple name declared in router configuration, such as main-router

Forgerock Common REST Monitoring Endpoint Metrics

Forgerock Common REST Monitoring Endpoint metrics are JSON objects. Their _id values have the form [heap name].[router name].deployed-routes.

Route metrics

Route metrics can be monitored through the endpoints described in Section 16.1, "Prometheus Scrape Endpoint" in the Gateway Guide and Procedure 16.2, "To Monitor the Forgerock Common REST Monitoring Endpoint" in the Gateway Guide.

Prometheus Scrape Endpoint Metrics

The following table lists Prometheus metrics available for each route.

Each route metric has the following labels:

  • name: route name, such as My Route

    If the router was declared with a default handler, then its metrics are published through the route named default.

  • route: route identifier, such as my-route

  • router: fully qualified name of the router, such as gateway.main-router

Table 2. Prometheus Route Metrics
NameTypeDescription
ig_route_request_active Gauge Number of requests being processed.
ig_route_request_total Counter Number of requests processed by the router or route since it was deployed.
ig_route_response_error_total Counter Number of responses that threw an exception.
ig_route_response_null_total Counter Number of responses that were not handled by IG.
ig_route_response_status_total Counter

Number of responses by HTTP status code family.

The family label depends on the HTTP status code:

informational (1xx)
successful (2xx)
redirection (3xx)
client_error (4xx)
server_error (5xx)
unknown (status code >= 600)
ig_route_response_time Summary A Summary which provides response time observations such as quantiles, the total sum of observation, and the count of events that have been observed.

ig_route_response_time metrics:

{
 ig_route_response_time_count{...}                     // (number) events recorded
 ig_route_response_time_seconds_total{...}             // (number) sum of the amounts of events recorded
 ig_route_response_time_seconds{...,quantile="0.5",}   // 50% at or below this value
 ig_route_response_time_seconds{...,quantile="0.75",}  // 75% at or below this value
 ig_route_response_time_seconds{...,quantile="0.95",}  // 95% at or below this value
 ig_route_response_time_seconds{...,quantile="0.98",}  // 98% at or below this value
 ig_route_response_time_seconds{...,quantile="0.99",}  // 99% at or below this value
 ig_route_response_time_seconds{...,quantile="0.999",} // 99.9% at or below this value
}

Forgerock Common REST Monitoring Endpoint Metrics

The following table lists all the metrics available through the Forgerock Common REST Monitoring Endpoint for each route. The metric are published with an _id whose pattern is heap. router name.route.route name. metric:

Table 3. Forgerock Common REST Monitoring Endpoint metrics
NameTypeDescription
request Counter Number of requests processed by the router or route since it was deployed.
request.active Gauge Number of requests being processed by the router or route at this moment.
response.error Counter Number of responses that threw an exception.
response.null Counter Number of responses that were not handled by IG.
response.status.client_error Counter Number of responses with an HTTP status code 400-499, indicating client error.
response.status.informational Counter Number of responses with an HTTP status code 100-199, indicating that they are provisional responses.
response.status.redirection Counter Number of responses with an HTTP status code 300-399, indicating a redirect.
response.status.server_error Counter Number of responses with an HTTP status code 500-599, indicating server error.
response.status.successful Counter Number of responses with an HTTP status code 200-299, indicating success.
response.status.unknown Counter Number of responses with an HTTP status code 600-699, indicating that a request failed completely and was not executed.
response.time Timer A set of response time time-series summary statistics.

response.time field has the following fields:

{
  "_id" : "heap.router-name.route-name.response.time", // id of this metric
  "count": number,                                     // events recorded for this metric
  "total": number,                                     // sum of the durations of events recorded for this metric
  "mean_rate": number,                                 // average rate
  "m1_rate": number,                                   // one-minute average rate
  "m5_rate": number,                                   // five-minute average rate
  "m15_rate": number,                                  // fifteen-minute average rate
  "mean": number,                                      // total/count, or 0 if count is 0
  "min": number,                                       // minimum duration recorded
  "max": number,                                       // maximum duration recorded
  "stddev": number,                                    // standard deviation of recorded durations
  "p50": number,                                       // 50% at or below this value
  "p75": number,                                       // 75% at or below this value
  "p95": number,                                       // 95% at or below this value
  "p98": number,                                       // 98% at or below this value
  "p99": number,                                       // 99% at or below this value
  "p999": number,                                      // 99.9% at or below this value
  "p9999": number,                                     // 99.99% at or below this value
  "p99999": number,                                    // 99.999% at or below this value
  "duration_units" : "milliseconds",
  "rate_units" : "calls/second",
  "_type" : "timer"
}

IG Route Monitoring Endpoint (Deprecated)

When a route has "monitor": true, monitoring statistics are exposed through the IG Route Monitoring Endpoint. IG logs the paths to the HTTP endpoints when the log level is INFO or finer.

The IG Route Monitoring Endpoint supports only read (HTTP GET).

IG does not reset or persist monitoring statistics. When the IG container stops, collected statistics are discarded.

IG system logs indicate the monitoring endpoints with messages such as:

[deprecated] Monitoring endpoint available at '/openig/api/system/objects/main-router/routes/00-monitor/monitoring'

To access a monitoring endpoint over HTTP or HTTPS, prefix the endpoint with the IG scheme, host, and port to obtain a full URL, such as: http://openig.example.com:8080/openig/api/system/objects/main-router/routes/00-monitor/monitoring. When you access the URL, a JSON monitoring resource displays request and response statistics.

A JSON resource with default percentiles has the following form, where the field values are described in comments:

{
  "requests": {
     "total": number,            // Total requests
    "active": number             // Requests being processed
  },
  "responses": {
    "total": number,             // Total responses
    "info": number,              // Informational responses (1xx)
    "success": number,           // Successful responses (2xx)
    "redirect": number,          // Redirection responses (3xx)
    "clientError": number,       // Client error responses (4xx)
    "serverError": number,       // Server error responses (5xx)
    "other": number,             // Responses with status code >= 600
    "errors": number,            // An exception was thrown.
    "null": number               // Responses not handled by IG
  },
  "throughput": {                // Responses per second
    "mean": number,              // Mean (average) since monitoring started
    "lastMinute": number,        // One-minute moving average rate
    "last5Minutes": number,      // Five-minute moving average rate
    "last15Minutes": number      // 15-minute moving average rate
  },
  "responseTime": {              // Response times in milliseconds
    "mean": number,              // Mean (average) response time
    "median": number,            // Median response time
    "standardDeviation": number, // Std. dev. for response time
    "total": number,             // Cumulative resp. processing time
    "percentiles": {             // Response times in ms after which:
      "0.999": number,           // 99.9% of responses were sent
      "0.9999": number,          // 99.99% of responses were sent
      "0.99999": number          // 99.999% of responses were sent
    }
  }
}

Throttling Filters and Policies


To protect applications from being overused by clients, use a throttling filter to limit how many requests clients can make in a defined time.

Name

ThrottlingFilter — limit the rate of requests

Description

Limits the rate that requests pass through a filter. The maximum number of requests that a client is allowed to make in a defined time is called the throttling rate.

When the throttling rate is reached, IG issues an HTTP status code 429 Too Many Requests and a Retry-After header, whose value is rounded up to the number of seconds to wait before trying the request again.

   GET http://openig.example.com:8080/home/throttle-scriptable HTTP/1.1

    . . .

    HTTP/1.1 429 Too Many Requests
    Retry-After: 10
  

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "ThrottlingFilter",
    "config": {
        "requestGroupingPolicy": runtime expression<string>,
        "throttlingRatePolicy": reference or inline declaration,  //Use either "throttlingRatePolicy"
        "rate": {                                                 //or "rate", but not both.
            "numberOfRequests": integer,
            "duration": duration string
        },
        "cleaningInterval": duration string,
        "executor": executor
    }
}

Properties

"requestGroupingPolicy": runtime expression<string>, optional

An expression to identify the partition to use for the request. In many cases the partition identifies an individual client that sends requests, but it can also identify a group that sends requests. The expression can evaluate to the client IP address or user ID, or an OpenID Connect subject/issuer.

Default: Empty string. The value for this expression must not be null.

See also Expressions(5).

"throttlingRatePolicy": reference or inline declaration, required if "rate" is not used

A reference to or inline declaration of a policy to apply for throttling rate. The following policies can be used:

This value for this parameter must not be null.

"rate": rate object, required if "throttlingRatePolicy" is not used

The throttling rate to apply to requests. The rate is calculated as the number of requests divided by the duration:

"numberOfRequests": integer, required

The number of requests allowed through the filter in the time specified by "duration".

"duration": duration string, required

A time interval during which the number of requests passing through the filter is counted.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"cleaningInterval": duration, optional

The time to wait before cleaning outdated partitions. The value must be more than zero but not more than one day.

"executor": executor, optional

An executor service to schedule the execution of tasks, such as the clean up of partitions that are no longer used.

Default: ScheduledExecutorService

See also ScheduledExecutorService(5).

Examples

The following links provide examples of how the throttling policies are implemented:

The following route defines a throttling rate of 6 requests/10 seconds to requests. For information about how to set up and test this example, see Section 17.1, " Configuring a Simple Throttling Filter " in the Gateway Guide.

{
  "name": "00-throttle-simple",
  "monitor": false,
  "baseURI": "http://app.example.com:8081",
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/throttle-simple')}",
  "handler": {
    "type": "Chain",
    "config": {
      "filters": [
        {
          "type": "ThrottlingFilter",
          "name": "ThrottlingFilter-1",
          "config": {
            "requestGroupingPolicy": "",
            "rate": {
              "numberOfRequests": 6,
              "duration": "10 s"
            }
          }
        }
      ],
      "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  }
}

Name

MappedThrottlingPolicy — map throttling rates to groups of requests

Description

Maps different throttling rates to different groups of requests, according to the evaluation of throttlingRateMapper.

Usage

{
    "type": "ThrottlingFilter",
    "config": {
        "requestGroupingPolicy": expression,
        "throttlingRatePolicy": {
            "type": "MappedThrottlingPolicy",
            "config": {
                "throttlingRateMapper": runtime expression<string>,
                "throttlingRatesMapping": {
                    "mapping1": {
                        "numberOfRequests": integer,
                        "duration": duration string
                    },
                    "mapping2": {
                        "numberOfRequests": integer,
                        "duration": duration string
                    }
                },
                "defaultRate": {
                    "numberOfRequests": integer,
                    "duration": duration string
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Properties

"throttlingRateMapper": runtime expression<string>, required

An expression to categorize requests for mapping to a throttling rate in the throttlingRatesMapping.

If this parameter is null or does not match any specified mappings, the default throttling rate is applied.

"throttlingRatesMapping": object, required

A map of throttling rate by request group. Requests are categorized into groups by the evaluation of the expression "throttlingRateMapper".

"mapping1" and "mapping2": string, required

The evaluation of the expression "throttlingRateMapper".

The number of mappings is not limited to two.

"numberOfRequests": integer, required

The number of requests allowed through the filter in the time specified by "duration".

"duration": duration string, required

A time interval during which the number of requests passing through the filter is counted.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"defaultRate": object, required

The default throttling rate to apply if the evaluation of the expression "throttlingRateMapper" is null or is not mapped to a throttling rate.

"numberOfRequests": integer, required

The number of requests allowed through the filter in the time specified by "duration".

"duration": duration string, required

A time interval during which the number of requests passing through the filter is counted.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

Example of a Mapped Throttling Policy

In the following example, requests from users with different statuses are mapped to different throttling rates. For information about how to set up and test this example, see Section 17.2, "Configuring a Mapped Throttling Filter" in the Gateway Guide.

{
  "name": "00-throttle-mapped",
  "monitor": false,
  "baseURI": "http://app.example.com:8081",
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/throttle-mapped')}",
  "capture": "all",
  "handler": {
    "type": "Chain",
    "config": {
      "filters": [
        {
          "type": "FileAttributesFilter",
          "config": {
            "file": "/tmp/userfile",
            "key": "UserId",
            "value": "${request.headers['UserId'][0]}",
            "target": "${attributes.rate}"
          }
        },
        {
          "type": "ThrottlingFilter",
          "name": "ThrottlingFilter-1",
          "config": {
            "requestGroupingPolicy": "${attributes.rate.UserId}",
            "throttlingRatePolicy": {
              "type": "MappedThrottlingPolicy",
              "name": "MappedPolicy",
              "config": {
                "throttlingRateMapper": "${attributes.rate.status}",
                "throttlingRatesMapping": {
                  "gold": {
                    "numberOfRequests": 6,
                    "duration": "10 s"
                  },
                  "silver": {
                    "numberOfRequests": 3,
                    "duration": "10 s"
                  }
                },
                "defaultRate": {
                  "numberOfRequests": 1,
                  "duration": "10 s"
                }
              }
            }
          }
        }],
      "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  }
}

Name

ScriptableThrottlingPolicy — script to map throttling rates

Description

Uses a script to look up throttling rates to apply to groups of requests.

The script can store the mapping for the throttling rate in memory, and can use a more complex mapping mechanism than that used in the MappedThrottlingPolicy. For example, the script can map the throttling rate for a range of IP addresses. The script can also query an LDAP directory, an external database, or read the mapping from a file.

For information about creating scriptable objects in Studio, see Section 14.1.2, "Scripting in Studio" in the Gateway Guide and Section 17.3, " Configuring a Scriptable Throttling Filter " in the Gateway Guide.

Objects

The script has access to the following global objects:

Any parameters passed as args

You can use the configuration to pass parameters to the script by specifying an args object.

The args object is a map whose values can be scalars, arrays, and objects. The args object can reference objects defined in the heap by using expressions, for example, "${heap['ObjectName']}".

The values for script arguments can be defined as configuration expressions, and evaluated at configuration time.

Script arguments cannot refer to context and request, but context and request variables can be accessed directly within scripts.

Take care when naming keys in the args object. If you reuse the name of another global object, cause the script to fail and IG to return a response with HTTP status code 500 Internal Server Error.

All heap objects

The heap object configuration, described in Heap Objects(5).

openig

An implicit object that provides access to the environment when expressions are evaluated.

attributes

The attributes object provides access to a context map of arbitrary attributes, which is a mechanism for transferring transient state between components when processing a single request.

Use session for maintaining state between successive requests from the same logical client.

context

The processing context.

This context is the leaf of a chain of contexts. It provides access to other Context types, such as SessionContext, AttributesContext, and ClientContext, through the context.asContext(ContextClass.class) method.

contexts

a map<string, context> object. For information, see Contexts(5).

logger

The logger object provides access to a unique SLF4J logger instance for scripts, where the logger instance is named with the script name.

For information about logging for scripts, see Section 18.4.3, "Logging for Scripts" in the Gateway Guide.

request

The HTTP request.

session

The session object provides access to the session context, which is a mechanism for maintaining state when processing a successive requests from the same logical client or end-user.

Use attributes for transferring transient state between components when processing a single request.

Usage

{
   "type": "ThrottlingFilter",
   "config": {
       "requestGroupingPolicy": expression,
       "throttlingRatePolicy": {
           "name": string,
           "type": "ScriptableThrottlingPolicy",
           "config": {
               "type": string,
               "file": string,                        // Use either "file"
               "source": string or array of strings,  // or "source", but not both
               "args": object
           }
       }
   }
}

Properties

"type": string, required

The Internet media type (formerly MIME type) of the script. For Groovy, the value is "application/x-groovy".

"file": string, required if "source" is not used

The path to the file containing the script.

Relative paths in this field are relative to the base location for scripts, which depends on the configuration. For information, see Section 2.3, "Installing IG" in the Gateway Guide.

The base location for Groovy scripts is on the classpath when the scripts are executed. If a Groovy script is not in the default package, but instead has its own package name, it belongs in the directory corresponding to the package name. For example, a script in package com.example.groovy belongs under openig-base/scripts/groovy/com/example/groovy/.

"source": string or array of strings, required if "file" is not used

The script as a string or array of strings; mutually exclusive with "file".

For an example of "source" as an array of strings, see "Example of a Scriptable Throttling Policy".

"args": map, optional

Parameters passed from the configuration to the script.

  • The following example configures arguments as a map whose values can are scalars, arrays, and objects:

    {
      "args": {
        "title": "Coffee time",
        "status": 418,
        "reason": [
          "Not Acceptable",
          "I'm a teapot",
          "Acceptable"
        ],
        "names": {
          "1": "koffie",
          "2": "kafe",
          "3": "cafe",
          "4": "kafo"
        }
      }
    }

    A script can access the args parameters in the same way as other global objects. The following example sets the response status to I'm a teapot:

    response.status = Status.valueOf(418, reason[1])

    For information about the 418 status code see RFC 7168, Section 2.3.3 418 I'm a Teapot.

  • The following example configures arguments as strings and numbers for a ScriptableThrottlingPolicy:

    "args" : {
      "status" : "gold",
      "rate" : 6,
      "duration": "10 seconds"
    }

    The following lines set the throttling rate to 6 requests each 10 seconds when the response status is gold:

    "if (attributes.rate.status == status) {",
    "  return new ThrottlingRate(rate, duration)"
  • The following example configures arguments that reference a SampleFilter defined in the heap:

    {
      "heap": [
        {
          "name": "SampleFilter",
          "type": "SampleFilter",
          "config": {
            "name": "X-Greeting",
            "value": "Hello world"
          }
        }
      ]
    }

    The following line uses an expression in the args parameter to pass SampleFilter to the script:

    {
      "args": {
        "filter": "${heap['SampleFilter']}"
      }
    }

    The script can then reference SampleFilter as filter.

Example of a Scriptable Throttling Policy

In the following example, the DefaultRateThrottlingPolicy delegates the management of throttling to the scriptable throttling policy. For information about how to set up and test this example, see Section 17.3, " Configuring a Scriptable Throttling Filter " in the Gateway Guide.

{
  "name": "throttle-scriptable",
  "baseURI": "http://app.example.com:8081",
  "condition": "${matches(request.uri.path, '^/home/throttle-scriptable')}",
  "monitor": false,
  "handler": {
    "type": "Chain",
    "config": {
      "filters": [
        {
          "type": "FileAttributesFilter",
          "config": {
            "file": "/tmp/userfile",
            "key": "UserId",
            "value": "${request.headers['UserId'][0]}",
            "target": "${attributes.rate}"
          }
        },
        {
          "name": "ThrottlingFilter-1",
          "type": "ThrottlingFilter",
          "config": {
            "requestGroupingPolicy": "${attributes.rate.UserId}",
            "throttlingRatePolicy": {
              "type": "DefaultRateThrottlingPolicy",
              "config": {
                "delegateThrottlingRatePolicy": {
                  "name": "ScriptedPolicy",
                  "type": "ScriptableThrottlingPolicy",
                  "config": {
                    "type": "application/x-groovy",
                    "source": [
                      "if (attributes.rate.status == status) {",
                      "  return new ThrottlingRate(rate, duration)",
                      "} else {",
                      "  return null",
                      "}"
                    ],
                    "args": {
                      "status": "gold",
                      "rate": 10,
                      "duration": "10 seconds"
                    }
                  }
                },
                "defaultRate": {
                  "numberOfRequests": 1,
                  "duration": "10 s"
                }
              }
            }
          }
        }
      ],
      "handler": "ReverseProxyHandler"
    }
  }
}

Name

DefaultRateThrottlingPolicy — default policy for throttling rate

Description

Provides a default throttling rate if the delegating throttling policy returns null.

Usage

{
   "type": "ThrottlingFilter",
   "config": {
       "requestGroupingPolicy": expression,
       "throttlingRatePolicy": {
           "type": "DefaultRateThrottlingPolicy",
           "config": {
               "delegateThrottlingRatePolicy" : reference or inline declaration,
               "defaultRate": {
                   "numberOfRequests": integer,
                   "duration": duration string
               }
           }
       }
   }
}

Properties

"delegateThrottlingRatePolicy": reference, required

The policy to which the default policy delegates the throttling rate. The DefaultRateThrottlingPolicy delegates management of throttling to the policy specified by delegateThrottlingRatePolicy.

If delegateThrottlingRatePolicy returns null, the defaultRate is used.

For information about policies to use, see MappedThrottlingPolicy(5) and ScriptableThrottlingPolicy(5).

"defaultRate": object, required

The default throttling rate to apply if the delegating policy returns null.

"numberOfRequests": integer, required

The number of requests allowed through the filter in the time specified by "duration".

"duration": duration string, required

A time interval during which the number of requests passing through the filter is counted.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

Example

For an example of how this policy is used, see "Example of a Scriptable Throttling Policy" .

Miscellaneous Heap Objects


Name

AmService — Hold Configuration Information About an Instance of AM

Description

An AmService holds information about the configuration of an instance of AM. It is available to IG filters that communicate with that instance.

Usage

{
  "name": string,
   "type": "AmService",
   "config": {
     "agent": object,
     "amHandler": handler reference,
     "url": configuration expression<uri string>,
     "realm": configuration expression<string>,
     "sessionCache": object,
     "ssoTokenHeader": configuration expression<string>,
     "version": configuration expression<string>
   }
}

Properties

"agent": object, optional

Credentials of an AM J2EE agent that communicates WebSocket notifications to IG. The J2EE agent must be configured with the same credentials in IG and AM.

username: configuration expression<string>, required when agent is configured

Name of the AM agent.

password: configuration expression<string>, required when agent is configured

Password of the AM agent.

For an example route that uses WebSocket notifications to evict entries from the session cache, see "Example Route Using WebSocket Notifications to Clear Cache".

"amHandler": handler reference, optional

The handler to use for communicating with AM. In production, use a ClientHandler that is capable of making an HTTPS connection to AM.

Tip

To facilitate auditing, configure this handler with a ForgeRockClientHandler, which sends a ForgeRock Common Audit transaction ID when it communicates with protected applications.

Alternatively, configure this handler as a chain containing a TransactionIdOutboundFilter, as in the following configuration:

"amHandler" : {
  "type" : "Chain",
  "config" : {
    "handler": "MySecureClientHandler",
    "filters": [ "TransactionIdOutboundFilter" ]
  }
}

Default: ForgeRockClientHandler

See also Handlers, ClientHandler(5).

"url": configuration expression<uri string>, required

The URI of the AM server instance, for example: https://openam.example.com/openam.

"realm": configuration expression<string>, optional

The AM realm to use.

Default: / (top level realm).

"sessionCache": required when agent is configured, optional otherwise

Enable and configure caching of session information from AM, based on Caffeine. For more information, see the GitHub entry, Caffeine.

When session information is cached, IG can reuse session token information without repeatedly asking AM to verify the session token. When caching is disabled, IG must ask AM to verify the session token for each request.

If WebSocket notifications are enabled, as described in agent, the cache evicts entries based on session notifications from AM. For an example route that uses WebSocket notifications to evict entries from the session cache, see "Example Route Using WebSocket Notifications to Clear Cache".

enabled: boolean, optional

Enable caching.

Default: false

executor: executor, optional

An executor service to schedule the execution of tasks, such as the eviction of entries in the cache.

Default: ForkJoinPool.commonPool()

"maximumSize": configuration expression<number>, optional

The maximum number of entries the cache can contain.

Default: Unlimited/unbound.

maximumTimeToCache: configuration expression<duration string>, optional

The maximum duration for which to cache session info.

If maximumTimeToCache is longer than maxSessionExpirationTime, maxSessionExpirationTime is used.

Default: maxSessionExpirationTime, from SessionInfoContext.

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"ssoTokenHeader": configuration expression<string>, optional

The name of the header or cookie where this AM server expects to find SSO tokens.

Default: iPlanetDirectoryPro

"version": configuration expression<string>, optional

The version number of the AM server.

Specify the version number with at least one point, as follows:

  • For AM 5, specify 5.0

  • For AM 6, specify 6.0

  • For AM 5.5, specify 5.5

  • For AM 5.5.1, specify 5.5.1

If you specify the version number without a point, for example, AM 6, the default value is used.

Default: AM 5.

Example

For examples where AmService is used, see the example routes at the end of OAuth2ResourceServerFilter(5), PolicyEnforcementFilter(5), SingleSignOnFilter(5), and TokenTransformationFilter(5).


Name

ClientRegistration — Hold OAuth 2.0 client registration information

Description

A ClientRegistration holds information about registration with an OAuth 2.0 authorization server or OpenID Provider.

The configuration includes the client credentials that are used to authenticate to the identity provider. The client credentials can be included directly in the configuration, or retrieved in some other way using an expression, described in Expressions(5).

Usage

{
  "name": string,
  "type": "ClientRegistration",
  "config": {
    "clientId": expression,
    "clientSecret": expression,
    "issuer": Issuer reference,
    "registrationHandler": Handler reference,
    "scopes": [ expression, ...],
    "tokenEndpointAuthMethod": enumeration,
    "tokenEndpointAuthSigningAlg": string,
    "keyStore": reference,
    "privateKeyJwtAlias": string,
    "privateKeyJwtPassword": string,
    "claims": map or runtime expression<map>,
    "jwtExpirationTimeout": duration
  }
}

Properties

The client registration configuration object properties are as follows:

"name": string, required

A name for the client registration.

"clientId": expression, required

The client_id obtained when registering with the authorization server.

See also Expressions(5).

"clientSecret": expression, required if tokenEndpointAuthMethod is client_secret_basic or client_secret_post

The client_secret obtained when registering with the authorization server.

See also Expressions(5).

"issuer": Issuer reference, required

The provider configuration to use for this client registration.

Provide either the name of a Issuer object defined in the heap, or an inline Issuer configuration object.

See also Issuer(5).

"registrationHandler": Handler reference, optional

Invoke this HTTP client handler to communicate with the authorization server.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

Usually set this to the name of a ClientHandler configured in the heap, or a chain that ends in a ClientHandler.

Default: IG uses the default ClientHandler.

See also Handlers, ClientHandler(5).

"scopes": array of expressions, optional

OAuth 2.0 scopes to use with this client registration.

See also Expressions(5).

"tokenEndpointAuthMethod": enumeration, optional

The authentication method with which a client authenticates to the authorization server or OpenID provider at the token endpoint. The following client authentication methods are allowed:

  • client_secret_basic: Clients that have received a client_secret value from the authorization server authenticate with the authorization server by using the HTTP Basic authentication scheme, as in the following example:

    POST /oauth2/token HTTP/1.1
    Host: as.example.com
    Authorization: Basic ....
    Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
    
    grant_type=authorization_code&
      code=...

  • client_secret_post: Clients that have received a client_secret value from the authorization server authenticate with the authorization server by including the client credentials in the request body, as in the following example:

    POST /oauth2/token HTTP/1.1
    Host: as.example.com
    Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
    
    grant_type=authorization_code&
      client_id=...&
      client_secret=...&
      code=...

  • private_key_jwt: Clients send a signed JSON Web Token (JWT) to the authorization server. IG builds and signs the JWT, and prepares the request as in the following example:

    POST /token HTTP/1.1
    Host: as.example.com
    Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
    
    grant_type=authorization_code&
      code=...&
      client_id=<clientregistration_id>&
      client_assertion_type=urn%3Aietf%3Aparams%3Aoauth%3Aclient-assertion-type%3Ajwt-bearer&
      client_assertion=PHNhbWxwOl ... ZT

Some providers accept more than one authentication method. Where a provider strictly enforces how the client must authenticate, align the configuration with the provider.

If the configured method is not supported by the provider, then according to RFC 6749 The OAuth 2.0 Authorization Framework, section 5.2 the provider sends an HTTP 400 Bad Request response with an invalid_client error message as in the following example response:

HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request
Content-Type: application/json;charset=UTF-8
Cache-Control: no-store
Pragma: no-cache

{
  "error":"invalid_client"
}

If the configured method is invalid, an IllegalArgumentException is thrown.

Default: client_secret_basic

For information about client authentication methods, see OpenID Client Authentication.

"tokenEndpointAuthSigningAlg": string, optional

The JSON Web Algorithm (JWA) used to sign the JWT that is used to authenticate the client at the token endpoint. The property is used when private_key_jwt is used for authentication.

Use one of the following algorithms:

  • RS256: RSA using SHA-256

  • ES256: ECDSA with SHA-256 and NIST standard P-256 elliptic curve

  • ES384: ECDSA with SHA-384 and NIST standard P-384 elliptic curve

  • ES512: ECDSA with SHA-512 and NIST standard P-521 elliptic curve

Default: RS256

"keyStore": reference, required if private_key_jwt is used

The Java KeyStore containing the private key that is used to sign the JWT.

Provide the name of a KeyStore object defined in the heap, or an inline KeyStore configuration object.

For more information, see KeyStore(5).

"privateKeyJwtAlias": string, required if private_key_jwt is used

Name of the private key contained in the KeyStore.

"privateKeyJwtPassword": string, required if private_key_jwt is used

Password to access the private key contained in the KeyStore.

"claims": map or runtime expression<map>, optional

When private_key_jwt is used for authentication, this property specifies the claims used in the authentication. If this property is a map, the structure must have the format Map<String, Object>.

The JWT can contain the following claim value and other optional claims, where claims that are not understood are ignored:

"aud": string or array of strings, optional

The URI of the authorization server that is the intended audience of the token.

Default: URL of the authorization server token endpoint

In the following example, the claims include the value aud, which is the URI of the authorization server that is the audience of the token:

"claims": {
  "aud": "https://myapp.authentication.example.com"
}

If this property is an expression, its evaluation must yield an object of type Map<String, Object>. In the following example, overrideAudience is declared in the properties and then included in an expression in the claims declaration:

{
  "properties": {
    "overrideAudience": {
      "aud": "https://myapp.authentication.example.com"
    }
  }
}

"claims": "${overrideAudience}"

"jwtExpirationTimeout": duration, optional

When private_key_jwt is used for authentication, this property specifies the duration for which the JWT is valid.

Default: 1 minute

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

Example

The following example shows a client registration for AM. In this example client credentials are replaced with **********. In the actual configuration either include the credentials and protect the configuration file or obtain the credentials from the environment in a safe way:

{
    "name": "registration",
    "type": "ClientRegistration",
    "config": {
        "clientId": "**********",
        "clientSecret": "**********",
        "issuer": {
            "type": "Issuer",
            "config": {
                "wellKnownEndpoint": "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam/oauth2/.well-known/openid-configuration"
            }
        },
        "scopes": [
          "openid",
          "profile",
          "email"
        ]
    }
}

Name

JwtSession — store sessions in encrypted JWT cookies

Description

A JwtSession object holds settings for storing session information in JSON Web Tokens (JWT) that are encrypted and signed, and then placed in a cookie.

A JWT session is built or rebuilt when there is a write operation in the session (for example, when a user successfully logs in with SAML, assertions are stored in the session). The JWT contains a JSON representation of the session information. The supporting cookie can be configured as a session cookie or persistent cookie. By default it is a session cookie.

The JWT session information contains the session attributes (serialized as JSON), and a marker that IG uses to control the session timeout. When IG receives a JWT cookie, it checks that the current date and time are before the session timeout.

When using this storage implementation, you must use data types for session information that can be mapped to JavaScript Object Notation (JSON). JSON allows strings, numbers, true, false, null, as well as arrays and JSON objects composed of the same primitives. Java and Groovy types that can be mapped include Java primitive types and null, String and CharSequence objects, as well as List and Map objects.

As browser cookie storage capacity is limited to 4 KB, and encryption adds overhead, take care to limit the size of any JSON that you store. Rather than store larger data in the session information, consider storing a reference instead.

When a request enters a route that uses a new session type, the scope of the session information becomes limited to the route. IG builds a new session object and does not propagate any existing session information to the new object. session references the new session object. When the response then exits the route, the session object is closed, and serialized to a JWT cookie in this case, and session references the previous session object. Session information set inside the route is no longer available.

An HTTP client that performs multiple requests in a session that modify the content of its session can encounter inconsistencies in the session information. This is because IG does not share JwtSessions across threads. Instead, each thread has its own JwtSession objects that it modifies as necessary, writing its own session to the JWT cookie regardless of what other threads do.

Important

The security of your system depends on how well your keys and keystores are secured.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "JwtSession",
    "config": {
        "keystore": KeyStore reference,
        "alias": string,
        "password": configuration expression,
        "cookieName": string,
        "cookieDomain": string,
        "sessionTimeout": duration,
        "persistentCookie": boolean,
        "sharedSecret": string
    }
}

An alternative value for type is JwtSessionFactory.

Properties

"keystore": KeyStore reference, optional

The keystore holding the key pair with the private key used to encrypt the JWT.

Provide either the name of the KeyStore object defined in the heap, or the inline KeyStore configuration object inline.

Default: When no keystore is specified, IG generates a unique key pair, and stores the key pair in memory. With JWTs encrypted using a unique key pair generated at runtime, IG cannot decrypt the JWTs after a restart, nor can it decrypt such JWTs encrypted by another IG server.

See also KeyStore(5).

"alias": string, required when keystore is used

Alias for the private key.

"password": configuration expression, required when keystore is used

The password to read the private key from the keystore.

Configuration expressions can refer to the system heap properties, the built-in functions listed in Functions(5), the ${env['variable']}, and ${system['property']}. Because configuration expressions are evaluated before any requests are made, they cannot refer to the runtime properties, request, response, or context. For more information, see Expressions(5).

"cookieName" string, optional

The name of the JWT cookie stored on the user-agent.

Default: openig-jwt-session

"cookieDomain" string, optional

The name of the domain from which the JWT cookie can be accessed.

When the domain is specified, a JWT cookie can be accessed from different hosts in that domain.

Default: The domain is not specified. The JWT cookie can be accessed only from the host where the cookie was created.

"sessionTimeout" duration, optional

The duration for which a JWT session is valid. If the supporting cookie is persistent, this property also defines the expiry of the cookie.

The value must be above zero. The maximum value is 3650 days (approximately 10 years). If you set a longer duration, IG truncates the duration to 3650 days.

Default: 30 minutes

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

"persistentCookie" boolean, optional

Whether or not the supporting cookie is persistent:

  • true: the supporting cookie is a persistent cookie. Persistent cookies are reemitted by the user-agent until their expiration date or until they are deleted.

  • false: the supporting cookie is a session cookie. IG does not specify an expiry date for session cookies. The user-agent is responsible for deleting them when it considers that the session is finished (for example, when the browser is closed).

Default: false

"sharedSecret" string, optional

Specifies the key used to sign and verify the JWTs.

This attribute is expected to be base-64 encoded. The minimum key size after base-64 decoding is 32 bytes/256 bits (HMAC-SHA-256 is used to sign JWTs). If the provided key is too short, an error message is created.

If this attribute is not specified, random data is generated as the key, and the IG instance can verify only the sessions it has created.

Example

The following example defines a JwtSession for storing session information in a JWT cookie named IG, which can be accessed from the domain .example.com. The JWT is encrypted with a private key that is recovered using the alias private-key, and stored in the keystore. The password is both the password for the keystore and also the private key:

{
    "name": "JwtSession",
    "type": "JwtSession",
    "config": {
        "keystore": {
            "type": "KeyStore",
            "config": {
                "url": "file://${env['HOME']}/keystore.jks",
                "password": "${system['keypass']}"
            }
        },
        "alias": "private-key",
        "password": "${system['keypass']}",
        "cookieName": "IG",
        "cookieDomain": ".example.com"
    }
}

Name

KeyManager — configure a Java Secure Socket Extension KeyManager

Description

This represents the configuration for a Java Secure Socket Extension KeyManager, which manages the keys used to authenticate an SSLSocket to a peer. The configuration references the keystore that actually holds the keys.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "KeyManager",
    "config": {
        "keystore": KeyStore reference,
        "password": expression,
        "alg": string
    }
}

Properties

"keystore": KeyStore reference, optional

The keystore that references the store for the actual keys.

Provide either the name of the KeyStore object defined in the heap, or the inline KeyStore configuration object inline.

See also KeyStore(5).

"password": expression, required

The password to read private keys from the keystore.

"alg" string, optional

The certificate algorithm to use.

Default: the default for the platform, such as SunX509.

See also Expressions(5).

Example

The following example configures a key manager that depends on a KeyStore configuration. The keystore takes a password supplied as a Java system property when starting the container where IG runs, as in -Dkeypass=password. This configuration uses the default certificate algorithm:

{
    "name": "MyKeyManager",
    "type": "KeyManager",
    "config": {
        "keystore": {
            "type": "KeyStore",
            "config": {
                "url": "file://${env['HOME']}/keystore.jks",
                "password": "${system['keypass']}"
            }
        },
        "password": "${system['keypass']}"
    }
}

Name

KeyStore — configure a Java KeyStore

Description

This represents the configuration for a Java KeyStore, which stores cryptographic private keys and public key certificates.

Usage

{
    "name": name,
    "type": "KeyStore",
    "config": {
        "url": expression,
        "password": expression,
        "type": string
    }
}

Properties

"url": expression, required

URL to the keystore file.

See also Expressions(5).

"password": expression, optional

The password to read private keys from the keystore.

If the keystore is used as a truststore to store only public key certificates of peers and no password is required to do so, then you do not have to specify this field.

Default: No password is set.

See also Expressions(5).

"type": string, optional

The keystore format.

Default: the default for the platform, such as JKS.

Example

The following example configures a keystore that references a Java Keystore file, $HOME/keystore.jks. The keystore takes a password supplied as a Java system property when starting the container where IG runs, as in -Dkeypass=password. As the keystore file uses the default format, no type is specified:

{
    "name": "MyKeyStore",
    "type": "KeyStore",
    "config": {
        "url": "file://${env['HOME']}/keystore.jks",
        "password": "${system['keypass']}"
    }
}

Name

Issuer — Describe an Authorization Server or OpenID Provider

Description

An Issuer describes an OAuth 2.0 Authorization Server or an OpenID Provider that IG can use as a OAuth 2.0 client or OpenID Connect relying party.

An Issuer is generally referenced from a ClientRegistration, described in ClientRegistration(5).

Usage

{
  "name": string,
  "type": "Issuer",
  "config": {
    "wellKnownEndpoint": URL string,
    "authorizeEndpoint": URI expression,
    "registrationEndpoint": URI expression,
    "tokenEndpoint": URI expression,
    "userInfoEndpoint": URI expression,
    "issuerHandler": Handler reference,
    "issuerRepository": Issuer repository reference,
    "supportedDomains": [ domain pattern, ... ]
  }
}

Properties

If the provider has a well-known configuration URL as defined for OpenID Connect 1.0 Discovery that returns JSON with at least authorization and token endpoint URLs, then you can specify that URL in the provider configuration. Otherwise, you must specify at least the provider authorization and token endpoint URLs, and optionally the registration endpoint and user info endpoint URLs.

The provider configuration object properties are as follows:

"name": string, required

A name for the provider configuration.

"wellKnownEndpoint": URL string, required unless authorizeEndpoint and tokenEndpoint are specified

The URL to the well-known configuration resource as described in OpenID Connect 1.0 Discovery.

"authorizeEndpoint": expression, required unless obtained through wellKnownEndpoint

The URL to the provider's OAuth 2.0 authorization endpoint.

See also Expressions(5).

"registrationEndpoint": expression, optional

The URL to the provider's OpenID Connect dynamic registration endpoint.

See also Expressions(5).

"tokenEndpoint": expression, required unless obtained through wellKnownEndpoint

The URL to the provider's OAuth 2.0 token endpoint.

See also Expressions(5).

"userInfoEndpoint": expression, optional

The URL to the provider's OpenID Connect UserInfo endpoint.

Default: no UserInfo is obtained from the provider.

See also Expressions(5).

"issuerHandler": Handler reference, optional

Invoke this HTTP client handler to communicate with the authorization server.

Provide either the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

Usually set this to the name of a ClientHandler configured in the heap, or a chain that ends in a ClientHandler.

Default: IG uses the default ClientHandler.

See also Handlers, ClientHandler(5).

"issuerRepository": Issuer repository reference, optional

A repository of OAuth 2.0 issuers, built from discovered issuers and the IG configuration.

Provide the name of an IssuerRepository object defined in the heap.

Default: Look up an issuer repository named IssuerRepository in the heap. If none is explicitly defined, then a default one named IssuerRepository is created in the current route.

See also IssuerRepository(5).

"supportedDomains": array of patterns, optional

List of patterns matching domain names handled by this issuer, used as a shortcut for OpenID Connect discovery before performing OpenID Connect dynamic registration.

In summary when the OpenID Provider is not known in advance, it might be possible to discover the OpenID Provider Issuer based on information provided by the user, such as an email address. The OpenID Connect discovery specification explains how to use WebFinger to discover the issuer. IG can discover the issuer in this way. As a shortcut IG can also use supported domains lists to find issuers already described in the IG configuration.

To use this shortcut, IG extracts the domain from the user input, and looks for an issuer whose supported domains list contains a match.

Supported domains patterns match host names with optional port numbers. Do not specify a URI scheme such as HTTP. IG adds the scheme. For instance, *.example.com matches any host in the example.com domain. You can specify the port number as well as in host.example.com:8443. Patterns must be valid regular expression patterns according to the rules for the Java Pattern class.

Examples

The following example shows an AM issuer configuration for AM. AM exposes a well-known endpoint for the provider configuration, but this example demonstrates use of the other fields:

{
    "name": "openam",
    "type": "Issuer",
    "config": {
        "authorizeEndpoint":
          "https://openam.example.com:8443/openam/oauth2/authorize",
        "registration_endpoint":
          "https://openam.example.com:8443/openam/oauth2/connect/register",
        "tokenEndpoint":
          "https://openam.example.com:8443/openam/oauth2/access_token",
        "userInfoEndpoint":
          "https://openam.example.com:8443/openam/oauth2/userinfo",
        "supportedDomains": [ "mail.example.*", "docs.example.com:8443" ]
    }
}

The following example shows an issuer configuration for Google:

{
    "name": "google",
    "type": "Issuer",
    "config": {
        "wellKnownEndpoint":
          "https://accounts.google.com/.well-known/openid-configuration",
        "supportedDomains": [ "gmail.*", "googlemail.com:8052" ]
    }
}

Name

IssuerRepository — Store discovered and built OAuth2 issuers in a repository

Description

A repository to store OAuth2 issuers that are discovered or built from the configuration.

It is not normally necessary to change this object. Change it only for the following tasks:

  • To isolate different repositories in the same route.

  • To view the interactions of the well-known endpoint, for example, if the issuerHandler is delegating to another handler.

Usage

{
   "name": string,
   "type": "IssuerRepository",
   "config": {
     "issuerHandler": Handler reference
   }
}

Properties

The object properties are as follows:

"issuerHandler": handler reference, optional

The default handler to fetch OAuth2 issuer configurations from the well-known endpoint.

Provide the name of a Handler object defined in the heap, or an inline Handler configuration object.

Default: ForgeRockClientHandler


Name

ScheduledExecutorService — schedule the execution of tasks

Description

An executor service to schedule tasks for execution after a delay or for repeated execution with a fixed interval of time in between each execution. You can configure the number of threads in the executor service and how the executor service is stopped.

The ScheduledExecutorService is shared by all downstream components that use an executor service.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "ScheduledExecutorService",
    "config": {
        "corePoolSize":  integer or expression<integer>,
        "gracefulStop":  boolean or expression<boolean>,
        "gracePeriod" :  duration string or expression<duration string>
    }
}

Properties

"corePoolSize": integer or expression<integer>, optional

The minimum number of threads to keep in the pool. If this property is an expression, the expression is evaluated as soon as the configuration is read.

The value must be an integer greater than zero.

Default: 1

"gracefulStop": boolean or expression<boolean> , optional

Defines how the executor service stops. If this property is an expression, the expression is evaluated as soon as the configuration is read.

If true, the executor service does the following:

  • Blocks the submission of new jobs.

  • Allows running jobs to continue.

  • If a grace period is defined, waits for up to that maximum time for running jobs to finish before it stops.

If false, the executor service does the following:

  • Blocks the submission of new jobs.

  • Removes submitted jobs without running them.

  • Attempts to end running jobs.

  • If a grace period is defined, ignores it.

Default: true

"gracePeriod": duration string or expression<duration string>, optional

The maximum time that the executor service waits for running jobs to finish before it stops. If this property is an expression, the expression is evaluated as soon as the configuration is read.

If all jobs finish before the grace period, the executor service stops without waiting any longer. If jobs are still running after the grace period, the executor service stops anyway and prints a message.

When gracefulStop is false, the grace period is ignored.

Default: 10 seconds

For information about supported formats for duration, see duration.

Example

The following example creates a thread pool to execute tasks. When the executor service is instructed to stop, it blocks the submission of new jobs, and waits for up to 10 seconds for submitted and running jobs to complete before it stops. If any jobs are still submitted or running after 10 seconds, the executor service stops anyway and prints a message.

{
    "name": "ExecutorService",
    "comment": "Default service for executing tasks in the background.",
    "type": "ScheduledExecutorService",
    "config": {
        "corePoolSize": 5,
        "gracefulStop": true,
        "gracePeriod": "10 seconds"
    }
}

Name

TemporaryStorage — cache streamed content

Description

Allocates temporary buffers for caching streamed content during request processing. Initially uses memory; when the memory limit is exceeded, switches to a temporary file.

Usage

{
     "name": string,
     "type": "TemporaryStorage",
     "config": {
         "initialLength": number,
         "memoryLimit": number,
         "fileLimit": number,
         "directory": string
     }
}

Properties

"initialLength": number, optional

Initial size of the memory buffer.

Default: 8 192 bytes (8 KB). Maximum: The value of "memoryLimit".

"memoryLimit": number, optional

Maximum size of the memory buffer. When the memory buffer is full, the content is transferred to a temporary file.

Default: 65 536 bytes (64 KB). Maximum: 2 147 483 647 bytes (2 GB).

"fileLimit": number, optional

Maximum size of the temporary file. If the downloaded file is bigger than this value, an OverflowException is thrown.

Default: 1 073 741 824 bytes (1 GB). Maximum: 2 147 483 647 bytes (2 GB).

"directory": string, optional

The directory where temporary files are created.

Default: The value of the system property java.io.tmpdir, typically /tmp on Unix systems, or /var/tmp on Linux.


Name

TrustManager — configure a Java Secure Socket Extension TrustManager

Description

This represents the configuration for a Java Secure Socket Extension TrustManager, which manages the trust material (typically X.509 public key certificates) used to decide whether to accept the credentials presented by a peer. The configuration references the keystore that actually holds the trust material.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "TrustManager",
    "config": {
        "keystore": KeyStore reference,
        "alg": string
    }
}

Properties

"keystore": KeyStore reference, optional

The KeyStore that references the store for public key certificates.

Provide either the name of the KeyStore object defined in the heap, or the inline KeyStore configuration object inline.

See also KeyStore(5).

"alg" string, optional

The certificate algorithm to use.

Default: the default for the platform, such as SunX509.

Example

The following example configures a trust manager that depends on a KeyStore configuration. This configuration uses the default certificate algorithm:

{
    "name": "MyTrustManager",
    "type": "TrustManager",
    "config": {
        "keystore": {
            "type": "KeyStore",
            "config": {
                "url": "file://${env['HOME']}/keystore.jks",
                "password": "${system['keypass']}"
            }
        }
    }
}

Name

TrustAllManager — a TrustManager that blindly trusts all servers

Description

The TrustAllManager blindly trusts all server certificates presented the servers for protected applications. It can be used instead of a TrustManager(5) in test environments to trust server certificates that were not signed by a well-known CA, such as self-signed certificates.

The TrustAllManager is not safe for production use. Use a properly configured TrustManager(5) instead.

Usage

{
    "name": string,
    "type": "TrustAllManager"
}

Example

The following example configures a client handler that blindly trusts server certificates when IG connects to servers over HTTPS:

{
    "name": "BlindTrustClientHandler",
    "type": "ReverseProxyHandler",
    "config": {
        "trustManager": {
            "type": "TrustAllManager"
        }
    }
}

Name

UmaService — represent an UMA resource server configuration

Description

The UmaService includes a list of resource patterns and associated actions that define the scopes for permissions to matching resources. When creating a share using the REST API described below, you specify a path matching a pattern in a resource of the UmaService.

Usage

{
    "type": "UmaService",
    "config": {
        "protectionApiHandler": Handler reference,
        "amService": AmService reference,   // Use either "amService"
        "wellKnownEndpoint": URI string,    // or "wellKnownEndpoint", but not both.
        "resources": [ resource, ... ]
    }
}

Properties

"protectionApiHandler": Handler reference, required

The handler to use when interacting with the UMA authorization server to manage resource sets, such as a ClientHandler capable of making an HTTPS connection to the server.

For more information, see Handlers.

"amService": AmService reference, required if "wellKnownEndpoint" is not configured

The AmService heap object to use for the URI to the well-known endpoint for this UMA authorization server. The endpoint is extrapolated from the url property of the AmService, and takes the realm into account.

If the UMA authorization server is AM, use this property to define the endpoint.

If amService is configured, it takes precedence over wellKnownEndpoint.

For more information about the endpoint for UMA configuration, see Discovering UMA Configuration in the AM User-Managed Access (UMA) 2.0 Guide.

See also, AmService(5).

"wellKnownEndpoint": URI string, required if "amService" is not configured

The URI to the well-known endpoint for this UMA authorization server.

If the UMA authorization server is not AM, use this property to define the endpoint.

If amService is configured, it takes precedence over wellKnownEndpoint.

In this example, the UMA configuration is in the default realm of AM:

https://openam.example.com:8088/openam/uma/.well-known/uma2-configuration

In this example, the UMA configuration is in a European customer realm:

https://openam.example.com:8088/openam/uma/realms/root/realms/customer/realms/europe/.well-known/uma2-configuration

For more information about the endpoint for UMA configuration, see Discovering UMA Configuration in the AM User-Managed Access (UMA) 2.0 Guide.

"resources": array of resources, required

Resource objects matching the resources the resource owner wants to share.

Each resource object has the following form:

{
    "pattern": resource pattern,
    "actions": [
        {
            "scopes": [ scope string, ... ],
            "condition": runtime expression<boolean>
        },
        {
            ...
        }
    ]
}

Each resource pattern can be seen to represent an application, or a consistent set of endpoints that share scope definitions. The actions map each request to the associated scopes. This configuration serves to set the list of scopes in the following ways:

  1. When registering a resource set, IG uses the list of actions to provide the aggregated, exhaustive list of all scopes that can be used.

  2. When responding to an initial request for a resource, IG derives the scopes for the ticket based on the scopes that apply according to the request.

  3. When verifying the RPT, IG checks that all required scopes are encoded in the RPT.

A description of each field follows:

"pattern": resource pattern, required

A pattern matching resources to be shared by the resource owner, such as .* to match any resource path, and /photos/.* to match paths starting with /photos/.

See also Patterns(5).

"actions": array of action objects, optional

A set of actions on matching resources that the resource owner can authorize.

When granting permission, the resource owner specifies the action scope. Conditions specify what the scopes mean in concrete terms. A given scope matches a requesting party operation when the corresponding condition evaluates to true.

"scopes": array of scope strings, optional

Scope strings to identify permissions.

For example, #read (read access on a resource).

"condition": runtime expression<boolean>, required

A boolean expression representing the meaning of a scope.

For example, ${request.method == 'GET'} (true when reading a resource).

See also Expressions(5).

The REST API for Shares

The REST API for UMA shares is exposed at a registered endpoint. IG logs the paths to registered endpoints when the log level is INFO or finer. Look for messages such as the following in the log:

UMA Share endpoint available at
 '/openig/api/system/objects/_router/routes/00-uma/objects/umaservice/share'
  

To access the endpoint over HTTP or HTTPS, prefix the path with the IG scheme, host, and port to obtain a full URL, such as http://localhost:8080/openig/api/system/objects/_router/routes/00-uma/objects/umaservice/share.

The UMA REST API supports create (POST only), read, delete, and query (_queryFilter=true only). For an introduction to common REST APIs, see Section 5, "About ForgeRock Common REST".

In the present implementation, IG does not have a mechanism for persisting shares. When the IG container stops, the shares are discarded.

For information about API descriptors for the UMA share endpoint, see Section 1.10, "Understanding IG APIs With API Descriptors" in the Gateway Guide. For information about Common REST, see Section 5, "About ForgeRock Common REST".

A share object has the following form:

{
    "path": pattern,
    "pat": UMA protection API token (PAT) string,
    "id": unique identifier string,
    "resource_id": unique identifier string,
    "user_access_policy_uri": URI string
}

The fields are as follows:

"path": pattern, required

A pattern matching the path to protected resources, such as /photos/.*.

This pattern must match a pattern defined in the UmaService for this API.

See also Patterns(5).

"pat": PAT string, required

A PAT granted by the UMA authorization server given consent by the resource owner.

In the present implementation, IG has access only to the PAT, not to any refresh tokens.

"id": unique identifier string, read-only

This uniquely identifies the share. This value is set by the service when the share is created, and can be used when reading or deleting a share.

"resource_id": unique identifier string, read-only

This uniquely identifies the UMA resource set registered with the authorization server. This value is obtained by the service when the resource set is registered, and can be used when setting access policy permissions.

"user_access_policy_uri": URI string, read-only

This URI indicates the location on the UMA authorization server where the resource owner can set or modify access policies. This value is obtained by the service when the resource set is registered.

Property Value Substitution


In an environment with multiple IG instances, you can require similar but not identical configurations across the different instances.

Property value substitution enables you to do the following:

  • Define a configuration that is specific to a single instance, for example, setting the location of the keystore on a particular host.

  • Define a configuration whose parameters vary between different environments, for example, the URLs and passwords for test, development, and production environments.

  • Disable certain capabilities on specific nodes.

Property value substitution uses configuration tokens to introduce variables into the server configuration. For information, see Configuration Tokens(5).

The substitution follows a process of token resolution, JSON evaluation, and data transformation, as described in the following sections:

Name

Configuration Tokens — introduce variables into the server configuration

Description

A configuration token is a simple reference to a value. When configuration tokens are resolved, the result is always a string. Transformation described in Transformations(5) can be used to coerce the output type.

Configuration Tokens for File System

IG provides ig.instance.dir and ig.instance.url to define the file system directory and URL for configuration files.

Their values are computed at startup, and evaluate to a directory such as $HOME/.openig (%appdata%\OpenIG). You can use these tokens in your configuration without explicitly setting their values.

For information about how to change the default values, see Section 2.4, "Changing the Default Location of the Configuration Folders" in the Gateway Guide.

Configuration Token for Run Mode

If mode is not set in admin.json, the provided configuration token ig.run.mode can be resolved at startup to define the run mode.

Set the value to development or production, the value is not case-sensitive:

  • Development mode (mutable mode)

    Use development mode to evaluate or demo IG, or to develop configurations on a single instance. This mode is not suitable for production.

    In development mode, by default all endpoints are open and accessible. You can create, edit, and deploy routes through IG Studio, and manage routes through Common REST, without authentication or authorization.

    To protect specific endpoints in development mode, configure an ApiProtectionFilter in admin.json and add it to the IG configuration.

  • Production mode (immutable mode)

    After you have developed your configuration, switch to production mode to test the configuration, to run the software in pre-production or production, or to run multiple instances of the software with the same configuration.

    In production mode, the /routes endpoint is not exposed or accessible. Studio is effectively disabled, and you cannot manage, list, or even read routes through Common REST.

    By default, other endpoints, such as /monitoring, /share, and api/info are exposed to the loopback address only. To change the default protection for specific endpoints, configure an ApiProtectionFilter in admin.json and add it to the IG configuration.

For more information about admin.json, see AdminHttpApplication(5).

Syntax

Configuration tokens follow the syntax &{token[|default]}, as follows:

  • Are preceded by an ampersand, &

  • Are enclosed in braces, {}

  • Define default values with a vertical bar (|) after the configuration token

  • Are in lowercase

  • Use the period as a separator, .

When a configuration token is supplied in a configuration parameter, it is always inside a string enclosed in quotation marks, as shown in the following example:

"&{listen.port|8080}"

To escape a string with the syntax of a configuration token, use a backslash (\). The following string is treated as normal text:

"\&{listen.port|8080}"

A configuration property can include a mix of static values and expressions, as shown in the following example:

"&{hostname}.example.com"

Configuration tokens can be nested inside other configuration tokens as shown in the following example:

"&{&{protocol.scheme}.port}"

Default values or values in the property resolver chain can be nested, as shown in the following example:

"&{&{protocol.scheme|http}.port|8080}"


Name

JSON Evaluation — evaluation JSON files to substitute tokens and transform data types

Description

JSON evaluation is the process of substituting configuration tokens and transforming JSON nodes for an entire JSON configuration. After JSON evaluation, all configuration tokens and transformations in the configuration are replaced by values.

At startup, IG evaluates the configuration tokens in config.json and admin.json. When routes are deployed, IG evaluates the configuration tokens in the route.

Configuration tokens are matched with tokens available in the chain of resolvers, and the configuration token is substituted with the value available in the resolver. For information about each of the resolvers mentioned in the following section, see Token Resolution(5).

IG searches for matching tokens in the chain of resolvers, using the following order of precedence:

  1. Local resolver:

    • The route resolver for the route being deployed

  2. Intermediate resolver:

    • All intermediate route resolvers (for example, for parent routes to the route being deployed) up to the bootstrap resolver

  3. Bootstrap resolver:

    1. Environment variables resolver

    2. System properties resolver

    3. Token source file resolvers

    4. Hardcoded default values

The first resolver that matches the token returns the value of the token.

If the token can't be resolved, IG uses the default value defined with the configuration token. If there is no default value, the token can't be resolved and an error occurs:

  • If the configuration token is in config.json or admin.json, IG fails to start up.

  • If the configuration token is in a route, the route fails to load.

When configuration tokens are nested inside other configuration tokens, the tokens are evaluated bottom-up, or leaf-first. For example, if the following configuration token takes only the default values, it is resolved as follows:

  1. "&{&{protocol.scheme|http}.port|8080}"

  2. "&{http.port|8080}"

    When &{protocol.scheme|http} takes the default value http.

  3. "8080"

    When &{http.port|8080} takes the default value 8080.

If the configuration includes a transformation, IG applies the transformation after the token is substituted. When transformations are nested inside other transformations, the transformations are applied bottom-up, or leaf-first. For more information, see Transformations(5).


Name

Token Resolution — build a chain of token resolvers

Description

At startup, the bootstrap resolver builds a chain of resolvers to resolve configuration tokens included in config.json and admin.json. When a route is deployed, route resolvers build on the chain to add resolvers for the route.

Route Token Resolvers

When a route is deployed in IG a route resolver is created to resolve the configuration tokens for the route. The resolvers uses token values defined in the properties section of the route.

If the token can't be resolved locally, the route resolver accesses token values recursively in a parent route.

For more information, about route properties, see Properties(5).

Environment Variables Resolver

When the bootstrap resolver resolves a configuration token to an environment variable, it replaces the lowercase and periods (.) in the token to match the convention for environment variables.

The name of the environment variable must be composed of uppercase characters and underscores. The following example sets the value of an environment variable for the port number:

$ export LISTEN_PORT=8080

In the following IG configuration, the value of port is 8080:

{
  "port": "&{listen.port}"
}

System Properties Resolver

The system property name must match a configuration token exactly. The following example sets a system property for a port number:

$ java -Dlisten.port=8080 -jar start.jar

In the following IG configuration, the value of port is 8080:

{
  "port": "&{listen.port}"
}

Token Source File Resolvers

Token source files have the .json or .properties extension. The bootstrap resolver uses the files to add file resolvers to the chain of resolvers:

  • JSON file resolvers

    Token source files with the .json extension take a JSON format. The token name is mapped either to the JSON attribute name or to the JSON path.

    Each of the following .json files set the value for the configuration token product.listen.port :

    {
      "product.listen.port": 8080
    }

    {
      "product.listen {
         "port": 8080
      }
    }

    {
      "product" {
        "listen" {
          "port": 8080
        }
      }
    }

  • Properties file resolvers

    Token source files with the .properties extension are Java properties files. They contain a flat list of key/value pairs, and keys must match tokens exactly.

    The following .properties file also sets the value for the tokens listen.port and listen.address:

    listen.port: 8080
    listen.address: 192.168.0.10

Token source files are stored in one or more directories defined by the environment variable IG_ENVCONFIG_DIRS or the system property ig.envconfig.dirs.

If token source files are in multiple directories, each directory must be specified in a comma-separated list. IG doesn't scan subdirectories. The following example sets an environment variable to define two directories that hold token source files:

$ export IG_ENVCONFIG_DIRS="/myconfig/directory1, /myconfig/directory2"

At startup, the bootstrap resolver scans the directories in the specified order, and adds a resolver to the chain of resolvers for each token source file in the directories.

Although the bootstrap resolver scans the directories in the specified order, within a directory it scans the files in a nondeterministic order.

Note the following constraints for using the same configuration token more than once:

  • Do not define the same configuration token more than once in a single file. There is no error, but you won't know which token is used.

  • Do not define the same configuration token in more than one file in a single directory. An error occurs.

    Important

    This constraint implies that you can't have backup .properties and .json files in a single directory if they define the same tokens.

  • You can define the same configuration token once in several files that are located in different directories, but the first value that IG reads during JSON evaluation is used.

Note

When logging is enabled at the DEBUG level for token resolvers, the origin of the token value is logged.

If you are using the logback implementation in Section 18.2, " Reference Logback Configuration " in the Gateway Guide, add the following line to your logback.xml to enable logging:

<logger name="org.forgerock.config.resolvers" level="DEBUG"/>


Name

Transformations — built-in transformations to coerce strings to other data types

Description

A set of built-in transformations are available to coerce strings to other data types. The transformations can be applied to any string, including strings resulting from the resolution of configurations tokens.

After transformation, the JSON node representing the transformation is replaced by the result value.

Usage

{
   "$transformation": string or transformation
}

A transformation is a JSON object with a required main attribute, starting with a $. The following example transforms a string to an integer:

{"$int": string}

.

The value of a transformation value can be a JSON string or another transformation that results in a string. The following example shows a nested transformation:

{
  "$array": {
    "$base64:decode": string
  }
}

The input string must match the format expected by the transformation. In the previous example, because the final transformation is to an array, the input string must be a string that represents an array, such as "[ \"one\", \"two\" ]".

In the first transformation, the encoded string is transformed to a base64-decoded string. In the second, the string is transformed into a JSON array, for example, [ "one", "two" ].

array

{"$array": string}

Returns a JSON array of the argument.

Argument
string

String representing a JSON array.

Returns
array

JSON array.

Example

The transformation {"$array": "[ \"one\", \"two\" ]"} results in the JSON array [ "one", "two" ].

bool

{"$bool": string}

Returns a Boolean with a value represented by the argument.

Returns true if the input value equals "true" (ignoring case). Otherwise, returns false.

Argument
string

String containing the boolean representation.

Returns
boolean

Boolean value represented by the argument.

Example

If the configuration token &{capture.entity}" resolves to "true", the transformation {"$bool": "&{capture.entity}"} results in the value true.

decodeBase64

{
  "$base64:decode": string,
  "$charset": "charset"
}

Transforms a base64-encoded string into a decoded string.

If $charset is specified, the decoded value is interpreted with the character set.

Argument
string

Base64-encoded string.

Parameters
$charset

The name of a Java character set, as described in Class Charset.

Returns
string

Base64-decoded string in the given character set.

Example

The transformation

{
 "$base64:decode": "SGVsbG8=",
 "$charset": "UTF-8"
}

returns the Hello string.

encodeBase64

{
  "$base64:encode": string,
  "$charset": "charset"
}

Transforms a string into a base64-encoded string. Transforms to null if the string is null.

If $charset is specified, the string is encoded with the character set.

Argument
string

String to encode with the given character set.

Parameters
$charset

The name of a Java character set, as described in Class Charset.

Returns
string

Base64-encoded string.

int

{"$int": string}

Transforms a string into an integer.

If the parameter is not a valid number in radix 10, returns null.

Argument
string

String containing the integer representation.

Returns
int

Integer value represented by the argument.

Example

The transformation {"$int": "1234"}, results in the integer 1234.

list

{$list: string}

Transforms a comma-separated list of strings into a JSON array of strings

Argument
string

A string representing a comma-separated list of strings.

Returns
array

The JSON array of the provided argument. Values are not trimmed of leading spaces.

Example

The transformation {"$list": "Apple,Banana,Orange,Strawberry"}, results in the array of strings ["Apple","Banana","Orange","Strawberry"].

The transformation {"$list": "Apple, Banana, Orange, Strawberry"} results in the array of strings ["Apple"," Banana"," Orange"," Strawberry"], including the untrimmed spaces.

The transformation {"$list": "1,2,3,4"} results in the array of strings ["1","2","3","4"], and not an array of JSON numbers [1,2,3,4].

number

{$number: string}

Transform a string into a Java number, as defined in Class Number.

Argument
strings

A string containing the number representation.

Returns
number

The number value represented by the argument.

Example

The transformation {"$number": ".999"}, results in the number 0.999.

object

{"$object": string}

Transforms a string representation of a JSON object into a JSON object.

Argument
string

String representation of a JSON object.

Returns
object

JSON object of the argument.

Example

The transformation {"$object": "{\"ParamOne\":{\"InnerParamOne\":\"InnerParamOneValue\",\"InnerParamTwo\": false}}"}, results in the following JSON object:

{
  "ParamOne": {
    "InnerParamOne": "myValue",
    "InnerParamTwo": false
  }
}

Expressions


Many configuration parameters support dynamic expressions.

Name

Expressions — expression configuration parameter values

Description

Expressions are specified as configuration parameter values for a number of built-in objects. Such expressions conform to the Universal Expression Language as specified in JSR-245.

General Syntax

All expressions follow standard Universal Expression Language syntax: ${expression}. The expression can be a simple reference to a value, a function call, or arbitrarily complex arithmetic, logical, relational and conditional operations. When supplied within a configuration parameter, an expression is always a string enclosed in quotation marks, for example: "${request.method}".

Configuration and Runtime Expressions

Expressions are evaluated at configuration time (when routes are loaded), or at runtime (when IG is running).

When expressions are evaluated, they access the current environment through the implicit object openig. The object has the following properties:

  • baseDirectory, the path to the base location for IG files. The default location is $HOME/.openig (%appdata%\OpenIG).

  • configDirectory, the path to the IG configuration files. The default location is $HOME/.openig/config (%appdata%\OpenIG\config).

  • tempDirectory, the path to the IG temporary files. The default location is $HOME/.openig/tmp (%appdata%\OpenIG\tmp).

For information about how to change the default values, see Section 2.4, "Changing the Default Location of the Configuration Folders" in the Gateway Guide.

configuration expression

Expression evaluated at configuration time, when routes are loaded.

Configuration expressions can refer to the system heap properties, the built-in functions listed in Functions(5), the ${env['variable']}, and ${system['property']}. Because configuration expressions are evaluated before any requests are made, they cannot refer to the runtime properties, request, response, or context. For more information, see Expressions(5).

runtime expression

Expression evaluated at runtime, for each request and response.

Runtime expressions can refer to the same information as configuration expressions, plus the following objects:

Value Expressions

A value expression references a value relative to the scope supplied to the expression. For example, "${request.method}" references the method of an incoming HTTP request.

An lvalue-expression is a specific type of value expression that references a value to be written. For example, "${session.gotoURL}" specifies a session attribute named gotoURL to write a value to. Attempts to write values to read-only values are ignored.

Indexed Properties

Properties of values are accessed using the . and [] operators, and can be nested arbitrarily.

The value expressions "${request.method}" and "${request['method']}" are equivalent.

In the case of arrays, the index of an element in the array is expressed as a number in brackets. For example, "${request.headers['Content-Type'][0]}" references the first Content-Type header value in a request. If a property does not exist, then the index reference yields a null (empty) value.

Operations

Universal Expression Language supports arbitrarily complex arithmetic, logical, relational and conditional operations. They are, in order of precedence:

  • Index property value: [], .

  • Change precedence of operation: ()

  • Unary negative: -

  • Logical operations: not, !, empty

  • Arithmetic operations: *, /, div, %, mod

  • Binary arithmetic operations: +, -

  • Relational operations: <, >, <=, >=, lt, gt, le, ge, ==, !=, eq, ne

  • Logical operations: &&, and, ||, or

  • Conditional operations: ?, :

System Properties and Environment Variables

You can use expressions to retrieve Java system properties, and to retrieve environment variables.

For system properties, ${system['property']} yields the value of property, or null if there is no value for property. For example, ${system['user.home']} yields the home directory of the user running the application server for IG.

For environment variables, ${env['variable']} yields the value of variable, or null if there is no value for variable. For example, ${env['HOME']} yields the home directory of the user running the application server for IG.

Token Resolution

Runtime expressions have access to evaluated configuration tokens described in JSON Evaluation(5). For example, the following boolean expression returns true if the configuration token my.status.code resolves to 200:

${integer(_token.resolve('my.status.code', '404')) == 200}

Functions

A number of built-in functions described in Functions(5) can be called within an expression.

Syntax is ${function(parameter, ...)}, where zero or more parameters are supplied to the function. For example, "${toLowerCase(request.method)}" yields the method of the request, converted to lower case. Functions can be operands for operations, and can yield parameters for other function calls.

Escaping Literal Expressions

Use the backslash \ character as the escape character. For example, ${true} as an expression normally evaluates to true. To include the string ${true} in an expression, write \${true}.

You can also escape literal expressions by single-quoting the initial characters. For example, ${'${'}true} evaluates to ${true}. To include a single backslash \ character, write ${'\\'}. To include a double backslash, write ${'\\\\'}.

Embedding Expressions

Although an expression cannot be embedded as ${expression} inside another expression, embedding system property, environment variable, and function expressions within each other is fine. Do not enclose the embedded elements in ${}.

The following single line example embeds an env environment variable expression and the Java String.concat() method in the argument to a read() function:

"entity" : "${read('&{ig.instance.dir}/html/defaultResponse.html')}"

In the example the entity property value is set to the contents of the file $HOME/.openig/html/defaultResponse.html.

Extensions

IG offers a plugin interface for extending expressions. See Section 14.6.1, "Key Extension Points" in the Gateway Guide.

If your deployment uses expression plugins, read the plugin documentation about the additional expressions you can use.

Examples

"${request.uri.path == '/wordpress/wp-login.php'
   and request.form['action'][0] != 'logout'}"

"${request.uri.host == 'wiki.example.com'}"

"${request.cookies[keyMatch(request.cookies,'^SESS.*')][0].value}"

"${toString(request.uri)}"

"${request.method == 'POST' and request.uri.path == '/wordpress/wp-login.php'}"

"${request.method != 'GET'}"

"${request.headers['cookie'][0]}"

"${request.uri.scheme == 'http'}"

"${not (response.status.code == 302 and not empty session.gotoURL)}"

"${response.headers['Set-Cookie'][0]}"

"${request.headers['host'][0]}"

"${not empty system['my-variable'] ? system['my-variable'] : '/path/to'}/logs/gateway.log"

Name

Functions — built-in functions to call within expressions

Description

A set of built-in functions that can be called from within expressions, which are described in Expressions(5).

array

array(strings...)

Returns an array of the strings given as argument.

Parameters
strings

the strings to put in the array.

Returns
array

the resulting array of containing the given strings.

boolean

boolean(string)

Returns a Boolean with a value represented by the specified string.

The returned Boolean represents a true value if the string argument is not null and is equal to the string "true", ignoring case.

Parameters
string

the string containing the boolean representation.

Returns
Boolean

the Boolean value represented by the string.

contains

contains(object, value)

Returns true if the object contains the specified value. If the object is a string, a substring is searched for the value. If the object is a collection or array, its elements are searched for the value.

Parameters
object

the object to be searched for the presence of.

value

the value to be searched for.

Returns
true

if the object contains the specified value.

decodeBase64

decodeBase64(string)

Returns the base64-decoded string, or null if the string is not valid Base64.

Parameters
string

The base64-encoded string to decode.

Returns
string

The base64-decoded string.

encodeBase64

encodeBase64(string)

Returns the base64-encoded string, or null if the string is null.

Parameters
string

The string to encode into Base64.

Returns
string

The base64-encoded string.

fileToUrl

fileToUrl(file)

Converts a java.io.File into a string representation for the URL of the file or directory.

Parameters
file

The file or directory for which to build the URL.

For example, ${fileToUrl(openig.configDirectory)}/myProperties.json.

Returns
file

The string representation for the URL of the file or directory, or null if the file or directory is null.

For example, file:///home/gcostanza/.openig/config/myProperties.json.

formDecodeParameterNameOrValue

formDecodeParameterNameOrValue(string)

Returns the string that results from decoding the provided form encoded parameter name or value as per application/x-www-form-urlencoded, which can be null if the input is null.

Parameters
string

the parameter name or value

Returns
string

The string resulting from decoding the provided form encoded parameter name or value as per application/x-www-form-urlencoded.

formEncodeParameterNameOrValue

formEncodeParameterNameOrValue(string)

Returns the string that results from form encoding the provided parameter name or value as per application/x-www-form-urlencoded, which can be null if the input is null.

Parameters
string

the parameter name or value

Returns
string

The string resulting from form encoding the provided parameter name or value as per application/x-www-form-urlencoded.

indexOf

indexOf(string, substring)

Returns the index within a string of the first occurrence of a specified substring.

Parameters
string

the string in which to search for the specified substring.

substring

the value to search for within the string.

Returns
number

the index of the first instance of substring, or -1 if not found.

The index count starts from 1, not 0.

integer

integer(string)

Transforms the string parameter into an integer. If the parameter is not a valid number in radix 10, returns null.

Parameters
string

the string containing the integer representation.

Returns
integer

the integer value represented by the string.

integerWithRadix

integer(string, radix)

Uses the radix as the base for the string, and transforms the string into a base-10 integer. For example:

  • ("20", 8): transforms 20 in base 8, and returns 16

  • ("11", 16) transforms 11 in base 16, and returns 17

If either parameter is not a valid number, returns null.

Parameters
string

a string containing the integer representation, and an integer containing the radix representation.

Returns
integer

the integer value in base-10

join

join(strings, separator)

Joins an array of strings into a single string value, with a specified separator.

Parameters
separator

the separator to place between joined elements.

strings

the array of strings to be joined.

Returns
string

the string containing the joined strings.

keyMatch

keyMatch(map, pattern)

Returns the first key found in a map that matches the specified regular expression pattern, or null if no such match is found.

Parameters
map

the map whose keys are to be searched.

pattern

a string containing the regular expression pattern to match.

Returns
string

the first matching key, or null if no match found.

length

length(object)

Returns the number of items in a collection, or the number of characters in a string.

Parameters
object

the object whose length is to be determined.

Returns
number

the length of the object, or 0 if length could not be determined.

matchingGroups

matchingGroups(string, pattern)

Returns an array of matching groups for the specified regular expression pattern applied to the specified string, or null if no such match is found. The first element of the array is the entire match, and each subsequent element correlates to any capture group specified within the regular expression.

Parameters
string

the string to be searched.

pattern

a string containing the regular expression pattern to match.

Returns
array

an array of matching groups, or null if no such match is found.

matches

matches(string, pattern)

Returns true if the string contains a match for the specified regular expression pattern.

Parameters
string

the string to be searched.

pattern

a string containing the regular expression pattern to find.

Returns
true

if the string contains the specified regular expression pattern.

pathToUrl

pathToUrl(path)

Converts the given path into the string representation of its URL.

Parameters
path

The path of a file or directory as a string.

For example, ${pathToUrl(system['java.io.tmpdir'])}.

Returns
string

The string representation for the URL of the path, or null if the path is null.

For example, file:///var/tmp.

read

read(string)

Takes a file name as a string, and returns the content of the file as a plain string, or null on error (due to the file not being found, for example).

Either provide the absolute path to the file, or a path relative to the location of the Java system property user.dir.

Parameters
string

The name of the file to read.

Returns
string

The content of the file or null on error.

readProperties

readProperties(string)

Takes a Java Properties file name as a string, and returns the content of the file as a key/value map of properties, or null on error (due to the file not being found, for example).

Either provide the absolute path to the file, or a path relative to the location of the Java system property user.dir.

For example, to get the value of the key property in the properties file /path/to/my.properties, use ${readProperties('/path/to/my.properties')['key']}.

Parameters
string

The name of the Java Properties file to read.

Returns
object

The key/value map of properties or null on error.

split

split(string, pattern)

Splits the specified string into an array of substrings around matches for the specified regular expression pattern.

Parameters
string

the string to be split.

pattern

the regular expression to split substrings around.

Returns
array

the resulting array of split substrings.

toLowerCase

toLowerCase(string)

Converts all of the characters in a string to lower case.

Parameters
string

the string whose characters are to be converted.

Returns
string

the string with characters converted to lower case.

toString

toString(object)

Returns the string value of an arbitrary object.

Parameters
object

the object whose string value is to be returned.

Returns
string

the string value of the object.

toUpperCase

toUpperCase(string)

Converts all of the characters in a string to upper case.

Parameters
string

the string whose characters are to be converted.

Returns
string

the string with characters converted to upper case.

trim

trim(string)

Returns a copy of a string with leading and trailing whitespace omitted.

Parameters
string

the string whose white space is to be omitted.

Returns
string

the string with leading and trailing white space omitted.

urlDecode

urlDecode(string)

Returns the URL decoding of the provided string.

This is equivalent to "formDecodeParameterNameOrValue".

Parameters
string

The string to be URL decoded, which may be null.

Returns
string

The URL decoding of the provided string, or null if string was null.

urlEncode

urlEncode(string)

Returns the URL encoding of the provided string.

This is equivalent to "formEncodeParameterNameOrValue".

Parameters
string

The string to be URL encoded, which may be null.

Returns
string

The URL encoding of the provided string, or null if string was null.

urlDecodeFragment

urlDecodeFragment(string)

Returns the string that results from decoding the provided URL encoded fragment as per RFC 3986, which can be null if the input is null.

Parameters
string

the fragment

Returns
string

The string resulting from decoding the provided URL encoded fragment as per RFC 3986.

urlDecodePathElement

urlDecodePathElement(string)

Returns the string that results from decoding the provided URL encoded path element as per RFC 3986, which can be null if the input is null.

Parameters
string

the path element

Returns
string

The string resulting from decoding the provided URL encoded path element as per RFC 3986.

urlDecodeQueryParameterNameOrValue

urlDecodeQueryParameterNameOrValue(string)

Returns the string that results from decoding the provided URL encoded query parameter name or value as per RFC 3986, which can be null if the input is null.

Parameters
string

the parameter name or value

Returns
string

The string resulting from decoding the provided URL encoded query parameter name or value as per RFC 3986.

urlDecodeUserInfo

urlDecodeUserInfo(string)

Returns the string that results from decoding the provided URL encoded userInfo as per RFC 3986, which can be null if the input is null.

Parameters
string

the userInfo

Returns
string

The string resulting from decoding the provided URL encoded userInfo as per RFC 3986.

urlEncodeFragment

urlEncodeFragment(string)

Returns the string that results from URL encoding the provided fragment as per RFC 3986, which can be null if the input is null.

Parameters
string

the fragment

Returns
string

The string resulting from URL encoding the provided fragment as per RFC 3986.

urlEncodePathElement

urlEncodePathElement(string)

Returns the string that results from URL encoding the provided path element as per RFC 3986, which can be null if the input is null.

Parameters
string

the path element

Returns
string

The string resulting from URL encoding the provided path element as per RFC 3986.

urlEncodeQueryParameterNameOrValue

urlEncodeQueryParameterNameOrValue(string)

Returns the string that results from URL encoding the provided query parameter name or value as per RFC 3986, which can be null if the input is null.

Parameters
string

the parameter name or value

Returns
string

The string resulting from URL encoding the provided query parameter name or value as per RFC 3986.

urlEncodeUserInfo

urlEncodeUserInfo(string)

Returns the string that results from URL encoding the provided userInfo as per RFC 3986, which can be null if the input is null.

Parameters
string

the userInfo

Returns
string

The string resulting from URL encoding the provided userInfo as per RFC 3986.

More Information

Some functions are provided by org.forgerock.openig.el.Functions.

Other functions are provided by org.forgerock.http.util.Uris.


Name

Patterns — regular expression patterns

Description

Patterns in configuration parameters and expressions use the standard Java regular expression Pattern class. For more information on regular expressions, see Oracle's tutorial on Regular Expressions.

Pattern Templates

A regular expression pattern template expresses a transformation to be applied for a matching regular expression pattern. It may contain references to capturing groups within the match result. Each occurrence of $g (where g is an integer value) is substituted by the indexed capturing group in a match result. Capturing group zero "$0" denotes the entire pattern match. A dollar sign or numeral literal immediately following a capture group reference can be included as a literal in the template by preceding it with a backslash ( \ ). Backslash itself must be also escaped in this manner.

More Information

Java Pattern class

Regular Expressions tutorial

Properties


Configuration parameters can be declared as properties in the IG configuration or in an external JSON file.

Name

Properties — declare configuration parameters as property variables in a route

Description

Configuration parameters, such as host names, port numbers, and directories, can be declared as property variables in the IG configuration or in an external JSON file. The variables can then be used in expressions in routes and in config.json to set the value of configuration parameters.

Properties can be inherited across the router, so a property defined in config.json can be used in any of the routes in the configuration.

Storing the configuration centrally and using variables for parameters that can be different for each installation makes it easier to deploy IG in different environments without changing a single line in your route configuration.

Usage

Simple Property Configured Inline

{
    "properties": {
        "<variable name>": "valid JSON value"
    }
}

Group Property Configured Inline

{
    "properties": {
        "<group name>": {
            ["<variable name>": "valid JSON value", ... ]
        }
    }
}

Properties Configured in One or More External Files

{
    "properties": {
        "$location": expression
    }
}

In this example, description1 and description2 prefix the variable names contained in the external file.

{
    "properties": {
        "description1" {
            "$location": expression
        {
        "description2" {
            "$location": expression
        {
    }
}

Properties

"<variable name>": string

The name of a variable to use in the IG configuration. The variable can be used in expressions in routes or in config.json to assign the value of a configuration parameter.

The value assigned to the variable can be any valid JSON value: string, number, boolean, array, object, or null.

  • In the following example from config.json, the URL of an application is declared as a property variable named appLocation. The variable is then used by the baseURI parameter of the handler, and can be used again in other routes in the configuration.

    {
        "properties": {
            "appLocation": "http://app.example.com:8081"
        },
        "handler": {
            "type": "Router",
            "baseURI": "${appLocation}",
            "capture": "all"
        }
    }

  • The following example adds the property variable ports to define an array of port numbers used by the configuration. The ports variable is referenced in the appLocation variable, and is resolved at runtime with the value in the ports array:

    {
        "properties" : {
            "ports": [8080, 8081, 8088],
            "appLocation": "http://app.example.com:${ports[1]}"
        },
        "handler": {
            "type": "Router",
            "baseURI": "${appLocation}",
            "capture": "all"
        }
    }

"<group name>": string, required

The name of a group of variables to use in the IG configuration. The group name and variable name are combined using dot notation in an expression.

In the following example from config.json, the property group directories contains two variables that define the location of files:

{
    "properties" : {
        "directories": {
            "config": "${openig.configDirectory.path}",
            "auditlog": "/tmp/logs"
        }
    }
}

The group name and variable name are combined using dot notation in the following example to define the directory where the audit log is stored:

{
    "type": "AuditService",
    "config": {
        "event-handlers": [
            {
            "class": "org.forgerock.audit.handlers.csv.CsvAuditEventHandler",
            "config": {
                "name": "csv",
                "logDirectory": "${directories.auditlog}",
                . . .
"$location": expression, required

The location and name of one or more JSON files where property variables are configured.

Files must be .json files, and contain property variables with a key/value format, where the key cannot contain the period (.) separator.

For example, this file is correct:

{
  "openamLocation": "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam/",
  "portNumber": 8081
}

This file would cause an error:

{
  "openam.location": "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam/",
  "port.number": 8081
}

Example 1. Property Variables Configured In One File

In the following example, the location of the file that contains the property variables is defined as an expression:

{
    "properties" : {
        "$location": "${fileToUrl(openig.configDirectory)}/myProperties.json"
    }
}

In the following example, the location of the file that contains the property variables is defined as a string:

{
    "properties" : {
        "$location": "file:///Users/user-id/.openig/config/myProperties.json"
    }
}

The file location can be defined as any real URL.

The file myProperties.json contains the base URL of an AM service and the port number of an application.

{
    "openamLocation": "http://openam.example.com:8088/openam/",
    "appPortNumber": 8081
}


Example 2. Properties Variables Configured In Multiple Files

In the following example, the property variables are contained in two files, defined as a set of strings:

{
    "properties": {
        "urls": {
            "$location": "file://path-to-file/myUrlProperties.json"
        },
        "ports": {
            "$location": "file://path-to-file/myPortProperties.json"
        }
    }
}

The file myUrlProperties.json contains the base URL of the sample application:

{
    "appUrl": "http://app.example.com"
}

The file myPortProperties.json contains the port number of an application:

{
    "appPort": 8081
}

The base config file, config.json, can use the properties as follows:

{
  "properties": {
    "urls": {
       "$location": "file:///Users/user-id/.openig/config/myUrlProperties.json"
    },
    "ports": {
       "$location": "file:///Users/user-id/.openig/config/myPortProperties.json"
    }
  },
  "handler": {
    "type": "Router",
    "name": "_router",
    "baseURI": "${urls.appUrl}:${ports.appPort}",
    . . .


Requests, Responses, and Contexts


This part of the reference describes the IG object model. The top-level objects are request, response, and contexts.

Name

AttributesContext — context for request attributes

Description

Provides a map for request attributes. When IG processes a single request, it injects transient state information about the request into this context. Attributes stored when processing one request are not accessible when processing a subsequent request.

IG automatically provides access to the attributes field through the attributes bindings in expressions. For example, to access a username with an expression, use ${attributes.credentials.username} instead of ${contexts.attributes.attributes.credentials.username}

Use SessionContext(5) to maintain state between successive requests from the same logical client.

Properties

"attributes": map

Map of information conveyed between filters and handlers. Cannot be null.


Name

CapturedUserPasswordContext — context for the decrypted AM password of the current user

Description

Provides the decrypted AM password of the current user. When the CapturedUserPasswordFilter(5) processes a request, it injects the decrypted password from AM into this context.

Properties

The context name is capturedPassword. The context has the following properties:

"raw": byte[]

The decrypted password as bytes.

"value": string

The decrypted password as a UTF-8 string.


Name

ClientContext — context for the HTTP client information

Description

Information about the client sending a request. When IG receives a request, it injects information about the client sending the request into this context.

Properties

"certificates": array

List of X.509 certificates presented by the client

If the client does not present any certificates, IG returns an empty list.

Never null.

"isExternal": boolean

True if the client connection is external.

"isSecure": boolean

True if the client connection is secure.

"localAddress": string

The IP address of the interface that received the request

"localPort": number

The port of the interface that received the request

"remoteAddress": string

The IP address of the client (or the last proxy) that sent the request

"remotePort": number

The source port of the client (or the last proxy) that sent the request

"remoteUser": string

The login of the user making the request, or null if unknown

This is likely to be null unless you have deployed IG with a non-default deployment descriptor that secures the IG web application.

"userAgent": string

The value of the User-Agent HTTP header in the request if any, otherwise null


Name

Contexts — HTTP request contexts

Description

The root object for request context information.

Contexts is a map of available contexts, which implement the Context interface. The contexts map's keys are strings and the values are context objects. A context holds type-safe information useful for processing requests and responses. The contexts map is populated dynamically when creating bindings for evaluation of expressions and scripts.

All context objects use their version of the following properties:

"context-Name": string

Name of the context.

"context-ID": string

Read-only string uniquely identifying the context object.

"context-rootContext": boolean

True if the context object is a RootContext (has no parent).

"context-Parent": Context object

Parent of this context object.

Properties

The contexts object can provide access to the following contexts for each request:

The contexts object can provide access to the following contexts when related filters are used:


Name

CdSsoContext — context for cross-domain SSO properties

Description

Provides the cross-domain SSO properties for the CDSSO token, the user ID of the session, and the full claims set. When the CrossDomainSingleSignOnFilter(5) processes a request, it injects the information in this context.

Properties

The context is named cdsso, and is accessible at ${contexts.cdsso}. The context has the following properties:

"claimsSet": JwtClaimsSet object, required

Full claims set for the identity of the authenticated user. Cannot be null.

"cookieInfo": object

Configuration data for the CDSSO authentication cookie, with the following attributes:

  • name: Cookie name (string)

  • domain: Cookie domain (optional string)

  • path: Cookie path (string)

None of the attributes can be null.

redirectEndpoint": string

Redirect endpoint URI configured for communication with AM. Cannot be null.

"sessionUid": string

Universal session ID. Cannot be null.

"token": string

Value of the CDSSO token. Cannot be null.


Name

CdSsoFailureContext — context for cross-domain SSO authentication error details

Description

Contains the error details for any error that occured during cross-domain SSO authentication. When the CrossDomainSingleSignOnFilter(5) processes a request, should an error occur that prevents authentication, the error details are captured in this context.

Properties

The context is named cdssoFailure, and is accessible at ${contexts.cdssoFailure}. The context has the following properties:

"error": The error (string)

The error that occurred during authentication. Cannot be null.

"description": Error description (string)

A description of the error that occurred during authentication. Cannot be null.

"throwable": Throwable

Any Throwable associated with the error that occured during authentication. Can be null.


Name

OAuth2Context — context for OAuth 2.0 access tokens

Description

Provides OAuth 2.0 access tokens. When the OAuth2ResourceServerFilter(5) processes a request, it injects the access token into this context.

Properties

The context name is oauth2, and the context has the following property:

"accessToken": AccessTokenInfo

The AccessTokenInfo is built from the following properties:

"info": (map<string>, object)

Raw JSON as a map.

"token": string

Access token identifier issued from the authorization server.

"scopes": space separated string

Scopes associated to this token.

"expiresAt": long

Timestamp (in milliseconds since epoch) when the token expires.


Name

PolicyDecisionContext — context for attributes and advices returned by AM policy decisions

Description

Provides attributes and advices returned by AM policy decisions. When the PolicyEnforcementFilter(5) processes a request, it injects the attributes and advices into this context.

Properties

The context name is policyDecision. The context has the following properties:

"attributes": unmodifiable map

The map of attributes provided in the policy decision. Can be empty, but not null.

"jsonAttributes": JsonValue

The map of attributes provided in the policy decision. Cannot be null.

"advices": map

The map of advices provided in the policy decision. Can be empty, but not null.

"jsonAdvices": JsonValue

The map of advices provided in the policy decision. Cannot be null.


Name

Request — HTTP request

Description

An HTTP request message.

Properties

"method": string

The method to be performed on the resource. Example: "GET".

"uri": object

The fully-qualified URI of the resource being accessed. Example: "http://www.example.com/resource.txt".

See also URI(5).

"version": string

Protocol version. Example: "HTTP/1.1".

"headers": object

Exposes message header fields as name-value pairs, where name is header name and value is an array of header values.

"cookies": object

Exposes incoming request cookies as name-value pairs, where name is cookie name and value is an array of string cookie values.

"form": object

Exposes query parameters and/or application/x-www-form-urlencoded entity as name-value pairs, where name is the field name and value is an array of string values.

"entity": object

The message entity body.

Methods are provided for accessing the entity as byte, string, or JSON content. For information, see Entity.


Name

Response — HTTP response

Description

An HTTP response message.

Properties

"cause": Exception object

The cause of an error if the status code is in the range 4xx-5xx. Possibly null.

"status": Status object

The response status.

For details, see Status(5).

"version": string

Protocol version. Example: "HTTP/1.1".

"headers": object

Exposes message header fields as name-value pairs, where name is header name and value is an array of header values.

"entity": object

The message entity body.

Methods are provided for accessing the entity as byte, string, or JSON content. For information, see Entity.


Name

SessionContext — context for the HTTP session

Description

Provides access to the HTTP session. When IG processes a request, an HTTP session is automatically created. Subsequent requests that resend the same session cookie share the session content.

When processing a single request, use AttributesContext(5) to transfer transient state between components and prevent IG from creating additional sessions.

IG automatically provides access to the session field through the session bindings in expressions. For example, to access a username with an expression, use ${session.username} instead of ${contexts.session.session.username}

Properties

"session": map

Provides access to the HTTP session. The session is a map with attributes that are name-value pairs of the format Map<String, Object>.

For web container sessions, any object can be stored in the session. For JwtSession, only JSON compatible types (such as primitive JSON structures, lists, arrays, and maps) can be stored in the session.

By default, sessions are web container sessions.


Name

SessionInfoContext — context for AM session information and properties

Description

Provides AM session information and properties. When the SessionInfoFilter(5) processes a request, it injects info and properties from the AM session into this context.

Properties

The context name is amSession. The context has the following properties:

"asJsonValue()": JsonValue

Raw JSON.

"latestAccessTime": instant

The timestamp of when the session was last used. Can be null if the DN is not resident on the SSO token, or if the time cannot be obtained from the session.

"maxIdleExpirationTime": instant

The timestamp of when the session would time out for inactivity. Can be null if the DN is not resident on the SSO token, or if the time cannot be obtained from the session.

"maxSessionExpirationTime": instant

The timestamp of when the session would time out regardless of activity. Can be null if the DN is not resident on the SSO token, or if the time cannot be obtained from the session.

"properties": map

The read-only map of properties bound to the session. Can be empty, but not null.

Only session properties that are whitelisted in AM are available. For information, see Session Property Whitelist Service .

"realm": string

The realm as specified by AM, in a user-friendly slash (/) separated format. Can be null if the DN is not resident on the SSO token.

"sessionHandle": string

The handle to use for logging out of the session. Can be null if the handle is not available for the session.

"universalId": string

The DN that AM uses to uniquely identify the user. Can be null if it cannot be obtained from the SSO token.

"username": string

A user-friendly version of the username. Can be null if the DN is not resident on the SSO token, or empty if it cannot be obtained from the DN.


Name

SsoTokenContext — context for SSO tokens and their validation information

Description

Provides SSO tokens and their validation information. When the SingleSignOnFilter(5) processes a request, it injects the value of the SSO token and additional information in this context.

Properties

The context name is ssoToken. The context has the following properties:

"info": map

Information associated with the SSO token, such as realm or uid. Cannot be null.

"value": string

The value of the SSO token. Cannot be null.


Name

Status — HTTP response status

Description

Represents an HTTP response status. For details, see RFC 7231: HTTP/1.1 Semantics and Content, Section 6.1. Overview of Status Codes.

Properties

"code": integer

Three-digit integer reflecting the HTTP status code.

"family": enum

Family Enum value representing the class of response that corresponds to the code:

Family.INFORMATIONAL

Status code reflects a provisional, informational response: 1xx.

Family.SUCCESSFUL

The server received, understood, accepted and processed the request successfully. Status code: 2xx.

Family.REDIRECTION

Status code indicates that the client must take additional action to complete the request: 3xx.

Family.CLIENT_ERROR

Status code reflects a client error: 4xx.

Family.SERVER_ERROR

Status code indicates a server-side error: 5xx.

Family.UNKNOWN

Status code does not belong to one of the known families: 600+.

"reasonPhrase": string

The human-readable reason-phrase corresponding to the status code.

For details, see RFC 7231: HTTP/1.1 Semantics and Content, Section 6.1. Overview of Status Codes.

"isClientError": boolean

True if Family.CLIENT_ERROR.

"isInformational": boolean

True if Family.INFORMATIONAL.

"isRedirection": boolean

True if Family.REDIRECTION.

"isServerError": boolean

True if Family.SERVER_ERROR.

"isSuccessful": boolean

True if Family.SUCCESSFUL.


Name

StsContext — context for the result of a token transformation

Description

Provides the result of a token transformation. When the TokenTransformationFilter(5) processes a request, it injects the result into this context.

Properties

The context name is sts. The context has the following properties:

"issuedToken": string

The result of the token transformation.


Name

TransactionIdContext — context for the transaction ID of a request

Description

The transaction ID of a request. When IG receives a request, it injects the transaction ID into this context.

Properties

The context name is transactionId. The context has the following properties:

"transactionId": TransactionId

The ID of the transaction.


Name

URI — Uniform Resource Identifier

Description

Represents a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) reference.

Properties

"scheme": string

The scheme component of the URI, or null if the scheme is undefined.

"authority": string

The decoded authority component of the URI, or null if the authority is undefined.

Use "rawAuthority" to access the raw (encoded) component.

"userInfo": string

The decoded user-information component of the URI, or null if the user information is undefined.

Use "rawUserInfo" to access the raw (encoded) component.

"host": string

The host component of the URI, or null if the host is undefined.

"port": number

The port component of the URI, or null if the port is undefined.

"path": string

The decoded path component of the URI, or null if the path is undefined.

Use "rawPath" to access the raw (encoded) component.

"query": string

The decoded query component of the URI, or null if the query is undefined.

Note

The query key and value is decoded. However, because a query value can be encoded more than once in a redirect chain, even though it is decoded it can contain unsafe ASCII characters.

Use "rawQuery" to access the raw (encoded) component.

"fragment": string

The decoded fragment component of the URI, or null if the fragment is undefined.

Use "rawFragment" to access the raw (encoded) component.


Name

UriRouterContext — context for HTTP request routing

Description

Provides routing information associated with a request. When IG routes a request, it injects information about the routing into this context.

Properties

The context name is router. The context has the following properties:

"baseUri": string

The portion of the request URI which has been routed so far.

"matchedUri": string

The portion of the request URI that matched the URI template.

"originalUri": URI

The original target URI for the request, as received by the web container.

The value of this field is read-only.

"remainingUri": string

The portion of the request URI that is remaining to be matched.

"uriTemplateVariables": map

An unmodifiable map, where the keys and values are strings. The map contains the parsed URI template variables keyed on the URI template variable name.


Name

UserProfileContext — context for user profile information from AM

Description

When the UserProfileFilter(5) processes a request, it injects the user profile information into this context. This context provides raw JSON representation, and convenience accessors that map commonly used LDAP field names to a context names.

Properties

The context name is userProfile, available at ${contexts.userProfile} with the following properties:

"username": string

User-friendly version of the username. This field is always fetched. If the underlying data store doesn't include username, this field is null.

Example of use: ${contexts.userProfile.username}

"realm": string

Realm as specified by AM, in a user-friendly slash (/) separated format. Can be null.

Example of use: ${contexts.userProfile.realm}

"distinguishedName": string

Distinguished name of the user. Can be null.

Example of use: ${contexts.userProfile.distinguishedName}

"commonName": string

Common name of the user. Can be null.

Example of use: ${contexts.userProfile.commonName}

"rawInfo": (map<string>, object)

Unmodifiable map of the user profile information.

This context contains the object structure of the AM user profile. Any individual field can be retrieved from the map. Depending on the requested fields, the context can be empty or values can be null.

Examples of use: ${contexts.userProfile.rawInfo}, ${contexts.userProfile.rawInfo.username}, ${contexts.userProfile.rawInfo.employeeNumber[0]}.

"asJsonValue()": JsonValue

Raw JSON of the user profile information.

Example of use: ${contexts.userProfile.asJsonValue()}

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