Reference

ForgeRock Identity Platform® serves as the basis for our simple and comprehensive Identity and Access Management solution. We help our customers deepen their relationships with their customers, and improve the productivity and connectivity of their employees and partners. For more information about ForgeRock and about the platform, see https://www.forgerock.com.

This guide describes in detail the configuration options for IG. It is for IG designers, developers, and administrators.

For API specifications, see the appropriate Javadoc.

The examples in this guide use some of the following third-party tools:

Reserved Routes

By default, IG reserves all paths starting with /openig for administrative use, and only local client applications can access resources exposed under /openig.

To change the base for administrative routes, edit admin.json. For more information, see AdminHttpApplication (admin.json).

Reserved Field Names

IG reserves all configuration field names that contain only alphanumeric characters.

If you must define your own field names, for example, in custom decorators, use names with dots, ., or dashes, -. Examples include my-decorator and com.example.myDecorator.

Field Value Conventions

IG configuration uses JSON notation.

This reference uses the following terms when referring to values of configuration object fields:

array

JSON array.

boolean

Either true or false.

certificate

java.security.cert.Certificate instance.

configuration token

Configuration tokens introduce variables into the server configuration. They can take values from Java system properties, environment variables, JSON and Java properties files held in specified directories, and from properties configured in routes. For more information, see JSON Evaluation.

duration

A duration is a lapse of time expressed in English, such as 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds. Durations are not case sensitive, and negative durations are not supported. The following units can be used in durations:

  • indefinite, infinity, undefined, unlimited: unlimited duration

  • zero, disabled: zero-length duration

  • days, day, d: days

  • hours, hour, h: hours

  • minutes, minute, min, m: minutes

  • seconds, second, sec, s: seconds

  • milliseconds, millisecond, millisec, millis, milli, ms: milliseconds

  • microseconds, microsecond, microsec, micros, micro, us, µs: microseconds

  • nanoseconds, nanosecond, nanosec, nanos, nano, ns: nanoseconds

expression

See Expressions.

configuration expression

Expression evaluated at configuration time, when routes are loaded. See Configuration Expressions.

runtime expression

Expression evaluated at runtime, for each request and response. See Runtime Expressions.

instant

An instantaneous point on the timeline, as a Java type. For more information, see Class Instant.

lvalue-expression

Expression yielding an object whose value is to be set.

Properties whose format is lvalue-expression cannot consume streamed content. They must be written with $ instead of #.

number

JSON number.

object

JSON object where the content depends on the object’s type.

pattern

A regular expression according to the rules for the Java Pattern class.

pattern-template

Template for referencing capturing groups in a pattern by using $n, where n is the index number of the capturing group starting from zero.

For example, if the pattern is \w+\s*=\s*(\w)+, the pattern-template is $1, and the text to match is key = value, the pattern-template yields value.

reference

References an object in the following ways:

  • An inline configuration object, where the name is optional.

  • A configuration expression that is a string or contains variable elements that evaluate to a string, where the string is the name of an object declared in the heap.

    For example, the following temporaryStorage object takes the value of the system property storage.ref, which must a be string equivalent to the name of an object defined in the heap:

    {
      "temporaryStorage": "${system['storage.ref']}"
    }
secret-id

String that references a secret managed the ForgeRock Commons Secrets Service, as described in Secrets.

The secret ID must conform to the following regex pattern: Pattern.compile("[a-zA-Z0-9]+(\\.[a-zA-Z0-9]+)*");

string

JSON string.

url

String representation for a resource available via the Internet. For more information, see RFC 1738.

About ForgeRock Common REST

ForgeRock® Common REST is a common REST API framework. It works across the ForgeRock platform to provide common ways to access web resources and collections of resources. Adapt the examples in this section to your resources and deployment.

This page describes the full Common REST framework. Some platform component products do not implement all Common REST behaviors exactly as described. For details, refer to the product-specific examples and reference information.

Common REST Resources

Servers generally return JSON-format resources, though resource formats can depend on the implementation.

Resources in collections can be found by their unique identifiers (IDs). IDs are exposed in the resource URIs. For example, if a server has a user collection under /users, then you can access a user at /users/user-id. The ID is also the value of the _id field of the resource.

Resources are versioned using revision numbers. A revision is specified in the resource’s _rev field. Revisions make it possible to figure out whether to apply changes without resource locking and without distributed transactions.

Common REST Verbs

The Common REST APIs use the following verbs, sometimes referred to collectively as CRUDPAQ. For details and HTTP-based examples of each, follow the links to the sections for each verb.

Create

Add a new resource.

This verb maps to HTTP PUT or HTTP POST.

For details, see Create.

Read

Retrieve a single resource.

This verb maps to HTTP GET.

For details, see Read.

Update

Replace an existing resource.

This verb maps to HTTP PUT.

For details, see Update.

Delete

Remove an existing resource.

This verb maps to HTTP DELETE.

For details, see Delete.

Patch

Modify part of an existing resource.

This verb maps to HTTP PATCH.

For details, see Patch.

Action

Perform a predefined action.

This verb maps to HTTP POST.

For details, see Action.

Query

Search a collection of resources.

This verb maps to HTTP GET.

For details, see Query.

Common REST Parameters

Common REST reserved query string parameter names start with an underscore, _. Reserved query string parameters include, but are not limited to, the following names:

  • _action

  • _api

  • _crestapi

  • _fields

  • _mimeType

  • _pageSize

  • _pagedResultsCookie

  • _pagedResultsOffset

  • _prettyPrint

  • _queryExpression

  • _queryFilter

  • _queryId

  • _sortKeys

  • _totalPagedResultsPolicy

Some parameter values are not safe for URLs, so URL-encode parameter values as necessary.

Continue reading for details about how to use each parameter.

Common REST Extension Points

The action verb is the main vehicle for extensions. For example, to create a new user with HTTP POST rather than HTTP PUT, you might use /users?_action=create. A server can define additional actions. For example, /tasks/1?_action=cancel.

A server can define stored queries to call by ID. For example, /groups?_queryId=hasDeletedMembers. Stored queries can call for additional parameters. The parameters are also passed in the query string. Which parameters are valid depends on the stored query.

Common REST API Documentation

Common REST APIs often depend at least in part on runtime configuration. Many Common REST endpoints therefore serve API descriptors at runtime. An API descriptor documents the actual API as it is configured.

Use the following query string parameters to retrieve API descriptors:

_api

Serves an API descriptor that complies with the OpenAPI specification.

This API descriptor represents the API accessible over HTTP. It is suitable for use with popular tools such as Swagger UI.

_crestapi

Serves a native Common REST API descriptor.

This API descriptor provides a compact representation that is not dependent on the transport protocol. It requires a client that understands Common REST, as it omits many Common REST defaults.

Consider limiting access to API descriptors in production environments in order to avoid unnecessary traffic.

To provide documentation in production environments, see To Publish OpenAPI Documentation instead.

To Publish OpenAPI Documentation

In production systems, developers expect stable, well-documented APIs. Rather than retrieving API descriptors at runtime through Common REST, prepare final versions, and publish them alongside the software in production.

Use the OpenAPI-compliant descriptors to provide API reference documentation for your developers:

  1. Configure the software to produce production-ready APIs.

    In other words, configure the software as for production so that the APIs match exactly.

  2. Retrieve the OpenAPI-compliant descriptor.

    The following command saves the descriptor to a file, myapi.json :

    $ curl -o myapi.json endpoint?_api
  3. If necessary, edit the descriptor.

    For example, add security definitions to describe the API protection.

  4. Publish the descriptor using a tool such as Swagger UI.

Create

There are two ways to create a resource, HTTP POST or HTTP PUT.

To create a resource using POST, perform an HTTP POST with the query string parameter _action=create, and the JSON resource as a payload. Accept a JSON response. The server creates the identifier if not specified:

POST /users?_action=create HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
Content-Length: ...
Content-Type: application/json
{ JSON resource }

To create a resource using PUT, perform an HTTP PUT including the case-sensitive identifier for the resource in the URL path, and the JSON resource as a payload. Use the If-None-Match: * header. Accept a JSON response:

PUT /users/some-id HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
Content-Length: ...
Content-Type: application/json
If-None-Match: *
{ JSON resource }

The _id and content of the resource depend on the server implementation. The server is not required to use the _id that the client provides. The server response to the request indicates the resource location as the value of the Location header.

If you include the If-None-Match header, you must use If-None-Match: *. In this case, the request creates the object if it does not exist, and fails if the object does exist. If you include any value other If-None-Match: *, the server returns an HTTP 400 Bad Request error. For example, creating an object with If-None-Match: revision returns a bad request error.

If you do not include If-None-Match: *, the request creates the object if it does not exist, and updates the object if it does exist.

Parameters
_fields=field[,field…​]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

Read

To retrieve a single resource, perform an HTTP GET on the resource by its case-sensitive identifier (_id), and accept a JSON response:

GET /users/some-id HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
Parameters
_fields=field[,field…​]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

_mimeType=mime-type

Some resources have fields whose values are multi-media resources, such as a profile photo.

If the feature is enabled for the endpoint, you can read a single field that is a multi-media resource by specifying the field and mime-type.

In this case, the content type of the field value returned matches the mime-type that you specify, and the body of the response is the multi-media resource.

Do not use the Accept header in this case. For example, Accept: image/png does not work. Use the _mimeType query string parameter instead.

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

Update

To update a resource, perform an HTTP PUT including the case-sensitive identifier (_id) as the final element of the path to the resource, and the JSON resource as the payload. Use the If-Match: _rev header to check that you are actually updating the version you modified. Use If-Match: * if the version does not matter. Accept a JSON response:

PUT /users/some-id HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
Content-Length: ...
Content-Type: application/json
If-Match: _rev
{ JSON resource }

When updating a resource, include all the attributes to retain. Omitting an attribute in the resource amounts to deleting the attribute unless it is not under the control of your application. Attributes not under the control of your application include private and read-only attributes. In addition, virtual attributes and relationship references might not be under the control of your application.

Parameters
_fields=field[,field…​]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

Delete

To delete a single resource, perform an HTTP DELETE by its case-sensitive identifier (\_id) and accept a JSON response:

DELETE /users/some-id HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
Parameters
_fields=field[,field…​]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

Patch

To patch a resource, send an HTTP PATCH request with the following parameters:

  • operation

  • field

  • value

  • from (optional with copy and move operations)

You can include these parameters in the payload for a PATCH request, or in a JSON PATCH file. If successful, you’ll see a JSON response similar to the following:

PATCH /users/some-id HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json
Content-Length: ...
Content-Type: application/json
If-Match: _rev
{ JSON array of patch operations }

PATCH operations apply to three types of targets:

  • single-valued, such as an object, string, boolean, or number.

  • list semantics array, where the elements are ordered, and duplicates are allowed.

  • set semantics array, where the elements are not ordered, and duplicates are not allowed.

ForgeRock PATCH supports multiple operations:

Patch Operation: Add

The add operation ensures that the target field contains the value provided, creating parent fields as necessary.

If the target field is single-valued, then the value you include in the PATCH replaces the value of the target. A single-valued field is an object, string, boolean, or number.

An add operation has different results on two standard types of arrays:

  • List semantic arrays: you can run any of these add operations on that type of array:

    • If you add an array of values, the PATCH operation appends it to the existing list of values.

    • If you add a single value, specify an ordinal element in the target array, or use the {-} special index to add that value to the end of the list.

  • Set semantic arrays: The value included in the patch is merged with the existing set of values. Any duplicates within the array are removed.

As an example, start with the following list semantic array resource:

{
    "fruits" : [ "orange", "apple" ]
}

The following add operation includes the pineapple to the end of the list of fruits, as indicated by the - at the end of the fruits array.

{
    "operation" : "add",
    "field" : "/fruits/-",
    "value" : "pineapple"
}

The following is the resulting resource:

{
    "fruits" : [ "orange", "apple", "pineapple" ]
}

You can add only one array element one at a time, as per the corresponding JSON Patch specification. If you add an array of elements, for example:

{
    "operation" : "add",
    "field" : "/fruits/-",
    "value" : ["pineapple", "mango"]
}

The resulting resource would have the following invalid JSON structure:

{
    "fruits" : [ "orange", "apple", ["pineapple", "mango"]]
}

Patch Operation: Copy

The copy operation takes one or more existing values from the source field. It then adds those same values on the target field. Once the values are known, it is equivalent to performing an add operation on the target field.

The following copy operation takes the value from a field named mail, and then runs a replace operation on the target field, another_mail.

[
  {
     "operation":"copy",
     "from":"mail",
     "field":"another_mail"
  }
]

If the source and target field values are arrays, the result depends on whether the array has list semantics or set semantics, as described in Patch Operation: Add.

Patch Operation: Increment

The increment operation changes the value or values of the target field by the amount you specify. The value that you include must be one number, and may be positive or negative. The value of the target field must accept numbers. The following increment operation adds 1000 to the target value of /user/payment.

[
  {
    "operation" : "increment",
    "field" : "/user/payment",
    "value" : "1000"
  }
]

Since the value of the increment is a single number, arrays do not apply.

Patch Operation: Move

The move operation removes existing values on the source field. It then adds those same values on the target field. This is equivalent to a remove operation on the source, followed by an add operation with the same values, on the target.

The following move operation is equivalent to a remove operation on the source field, surname, followed by a replace operation on the target field value, lastName. If the target field does not exist, it is created:

[
  {
     "operation":"move",
     "from":"surname",
     "field":"lastName"
  }
]

To apply a move operation on an array, you need a compatible single-value, list semantic array, or set semantic array on both the source and the target. For details, see the criteria described in Patch Operation: Add.

Patch Operation: Remove

The remove operation ensures that the target field no longer contains the value provided. If the remove operation does not include a value, the operation removes the field. The following remove deletes the value of the phoneNumber, along with the field.

[
  {
    "operation" : "remove",
    "field" : "phoneNumber"
  }
]

If the object has more than one phoneNumber, those values are stored as an array.

A remove operation has different results on two standard types of arrays:

  • List semantic arrays: A remove operation deletes the specified element in the array. For example, the following operation removes the first phone number, based on its array index (zero-based):

    [
       {
          "operation" : "remove",
          "field" : "/phoneNumber/0"
       }
    ]
  • Set semantic arrays: The list of values included in a patch are removed from the existing array.

Patch Operation: Replace

The replace operation removes any existing value(s) of the targeted field, and replaces them with the provided value(s). It is essentially equivalent to a remove followed by a add operation. If the arrays are used, the criteria is based on Patch Operation: Add. However, indexed updates are not allowed, even when the target is an array.

The following replace operation removes the existing telephoneNumber value for the user, and then adds the new value of +1 408 555 9999.

[
  {
    "operation" : "replace",
    "field" : "/telephoneNumber",
    "value" : "+1 408 555 9999"
  }
]

A PATCH replace operation on a list semantic array works as a PATCH remove operation. The following example demonstrates how the effect of both operations. Start with the following resource:

{
    "fruits" : [ "apple", "orange", "kiwi", "lime" ],
}

Apply the following operations on that resource:

[
  {
    "operation" : "remove",
    "field" : "/fruits/0",
    "value" : ""
  },
  {
    "operation" : "replace",
    "field" : "/fruits/1",
    "value" : "pineapple"
  }
]

The PATCH operations are applied sequentially. The remove operation removes the first member of that resource, based on its array index, (fruits/0), with the following result:

[
  {
    "fruits" : [ "orange", "kiwi", "lime" ],
  }
]

The second PATCH operation, a replace, is applied on the second member (fruits/1) of the intermediate resource, with the following result:

[
  {
    "fruits" : [ "orange", "pineapple", "lime" ],
  }
]

Patch Operation: Transform

The transform operation changes the value of a field based on a script, or some other data transformation command. The following transform operation takes the value from the field named /objects, and applies the something.js script as shown:

[
  {
    "operation" : "transform",
    "field" : "/objects",
    "value" : {
      "script" : {
        "type" : "text/javascript",
        "file" : "something.js"
      }
    }
  }
]

Patch Operation Limitations

Some HTTP client libraries do not support the HTTP PATCH operation. Make sure that the library you use supports HTTP PATCH before using this REST operation.

For example, the Java Development Kit HTTP client does not support PATCH as a valid HTTP method. Instead, the method HttpURLConnection.setRequestMethod("PATCH") throws ProtocolException.

Parameters
_fields=field[,field…​]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

Action

Actions are a means of extending Common REST APIs and are defined by the resource provider, so the actions you can use depend on the implementation.

The standard action indicated by _action=create is described in Create.

Parameters

In addition to these parameters, specific action implementations have their own parameters:

_fields=field[,field…​]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

Query

To query a resource collection (or resource container), perform an HTTP GET, and accept a JSON response, including either a _queryExpression, _queryFilter, or _queryId parameter. The parameters cannot be used together:

GET /users?_queryFilter=true HTTP/1.1
Host: example.com
Accept: application/json

The server returns the result as a JSON object including a "results" array, and other fields that depend on the parameters.

Parameters
_fields=field[,field…​]

Return only the specified fields in the body of the response.

The field values are JSON pointers. For example if the resource is {"parent":{"child":"value"}}, parent/child refers to the "child":"value".

If the field is left blank, the server returns all default values.

_queryFilter=filter-expression

Query filters request that the server return entries that match the filter expression. You must URL-escape the filter expression.

The string representation is summarized as follows. Continue reading for additional explanation:

Expr           = OrExpr
OrExpr         = AndExpr ( 'or' AndExpr ) *
AndExpr        = NotExpr ( 'and' NotExpr ) *
NotExpr        = '!' PrimaryExpr | PrimaryExpr
PrimaryExpr    = '(' Expr ')' | ComparisonExpr | PresenceExpr | LiteralExpr
ComparisonExpr = Pointer OpName JsonValue
PresenceExpr   = Pointer 'pr'
LiteralExpr    = 'true' | 'false'
Pointer        = JSON pointer
OpName         = 'eq' |  # equal to
                 'co' |  # contains
                 'sw' |  # starts with
                 'lt' |  # less than
                 'le' |  # less than or equal to
                 'gt' |  # greater than
                 'ge' |  # greater than or equal to
                 STRING  # extended operator
JsonValue      = NUMBER | BOOLEAN | '"' UTF8STRING '"'
STRING         = ASCII string not containing white-space
UTF8STRING     = UTF-8 string possibly containing white-space

JsonValue components of filter expressions follow RFC 7159: The JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) Data Interchange Format. In particular, as described in section 7 of the RFC, the escape character in strings is the backslash character. For example, to match the identifier test\, use _id eq 'test\\'. In the JSON resource, the \ is escaped the same way: "_id":"test\\".

When using a query filter in a URL, the filter expression is part of a query string parameter. A query string parameter must be URL encoded, as described in RFC 3986: Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax. For example, white space, double quotes ("), parentheses, and exclamation characters must be URL encoded in HTTP query strings. The following rules apply to URL query components:

query       = *( pchar / "/" / "?" )
pchar       = unreserved / pct-encoded / sub-delims / ":" / "@"
unreserved  = ALPHA / DIGIT / "-" / "." / "_" / "~"
pct-encoded = "%" HEXDIG HEXDIG
sub-delims  = "!" / "$" / "&" / "'" / "(" / ")"
                  / "*" / "+" / "," / ";" / "="

ALPHA, DIGIT, and HEXDIG are core rules of RFC 5234: Augmented BNF for Syntax Specifications:

ALPHA       =  %x41-5A / %x61-7A   ; A-Z / a-z
DIGIT       =  %x30-39             ; 0-9
HEXDIG      =  DIGIT / "A" / "B" / "C" / "D" / "E" / "F"

As a result, a backslash escape character in a JsonValue component is percent-encoded in the URL query string parameter as %5C. To encode the query filter expression _id eq 'test\\', use _id+eq+'test%5C%5C', for example.

A simple filter expression can represent a comparison, presence, or a literal value.

For comparison expressions, use json-pointer comparator json-value, where the comparator is one of the following:

eq (equals)
co (contains)
sw (starts with)
lt (less than)
le (less than or equal to)
gt (greater than)
ge (greater than or equal to)

For presence, use json-pointer pr to match resources where the JSON pointer is present, and the value it points to is not null.

Literal values include true (match anything) and false (match nothing).

Complex expressions employ and, or, and ! (not), with parentheses, (expression), to group expressions.

_queryId=identifier

Specify a query by its identifier.

Specific queries can take their own query string parameter arguments, which depend on the implementation.

_pagedResultsCookie=string

The string is an opaque cookie used by the server to keep track of the position in the search results. The server returns the cookie in the JSON response as the value of pagedResultsCookie.

In the request _pageSize must also be set and non-zero. You receive the cookie value from the provider on the first request, and then supply the cookie value in subsequent requests until the server returns a null cookie, meaning the final page of results has been returned.

The _pagedResultsCookie parameter is supported when used with the _queryFilter parameter. The _pagedResultsCookie parameter is not guaranteed to work with the _queryExpression or _queryId parameters.

The _pagedResultsCookie and _pagedResultsOffset parameters are mutually exclusive, and not to be used together.

_pagedResultsOffset=integer

When _pageSize is non-zero, use this as an index in the result set indicating the first page to return.

The _pagedResultsCookie and _pagedResultsOffset parameters are mutually exclusive, and not to be used together.

_pageSize=integer

Return query results in pages of this size. After the initial request, use _pagedResultsCookie or _pageResultsOffset to page through the results.

_prettyPrint=true

Format the body of the response.

_totalPagedResultsPolicy=string

When a _pageSize is specified, and non-zero, the server calculates the "totalPagedResults", in accordance with the totalPagedResultsPolicy, and provides the value as part of the response.

The "totalPagedResults" is either an estimate of the total number of paged results (_totalPagedResultsPolicy=ESTIMATE), or the exact total result count (_totalPagedResultsPolicy=EXACT). If no count policy is specified in the query, or if _totalPagedResultsPolicy=NONE, result counting is disabled, and the server returns value of -1 for "totalPagedResults".

_sortKeys=(+|-)field[,(+|-)field…​]

Sort the resources returned based on the specified field(s), either in + (ascending, default) order, or in - (descending) order.

Because ascending order is the default, including the + character in the query is unnecessary. If you do include the + character, it must be URL-encoded as %2B, for example:

http://localhost:8080/api/users?_queryFilter=true&_sortKeys=%2Bname/givenName

The _sortKeys parameter is not supported for predefined queries (_queryId).

HTTP Status Codes

When working with a Common REST API over HTTP, client applications should expect at least these HTTP status codes. Not all servers necessarily return all status codes identified here:

200 OK

The request was successful and a resource returned, depending on the request.

201 Created

The request succeeded and the resource was created.

204 No Content

The action request succeeded, and there was no content to return.

304 Not Modified

The read request included an If-None-Match header, and the value of the header matched the revision value of the resource.

400 Bad Request

The request was malformed.

401 Unauthorized

The request requires user authentication.

403 Forbidden

Access was forbidden during an operation on a resource.

404 Not Found

The specified resource could not be found, perhaps because it does not exist.

405 Method Not Allowed

The HTTP method is not allowed for the requested resource.

406 Not Acceptable

The request contains parameters that are not acceptable, such as a resource or protocol version that is not available.

409 Conflict

The request would have resulted in a conflict with the current state of the resource.

410 Gone

The requested resource is no longer available, and will not become available again. This can happen when resources expire for example.

412 Precondition Failed

The resource’s current version does not match the version provided.

415 Unsupported Media Type

The request is in a format not supported by the requested resource for the requested method.

428 Precondition Required

The resource requires a version, but no version was supplied in the request.

500 Internal Server Error

The server encountered an unexpected condition that prevented it from fulfilling the request.

501 Not Implemented

The resource does not support the functionality required to fulfill the request.

503 Service Unavailable

The requested resource was temporarily unavailable. The service may have been disabled, for example.