ForgeOps

About the forgeops repository

Use ForgeRock’s forgeops repository to customize and deploy the ForgeRock Identity Platform on a Kubernetes cluster.

The repository contains files needed for customizing and deploying the ForgeRock Identity Platform on a Kubernetes cluster:

  • Files used to build Docker images for the ForgeRock Identity Platform:

    • Dockerfiles

    • Scripts and configuration files incorporated into ForgeRock’s Docker images

    • Canonical configuration profiles for the platform

  • Kustomize bases and overlays

  • Skaffold configuration files

In addition, the repository contains numerous utility scripts and sample files. The scripts and samples are useful for:

  • Deploying ForgeRock’s CDK and CDM quickly and easily

  • Exploring monitoring, alerts, and security customization

  • Modeling a CI/CD solution for cloud deployment

See Repository reference for information about the files in the repository, recommendations about how to work with them, and the support status for the files.

Repository updates

New forgeops repository features become available in the release/7.2.0 branch of the repository from time to time.

When you start working with the forgeops repository, clone the repository. Depending on your organization’s setup, you’ll clone the repository either from ForgeRock’s public repository on GitHub, or from a fork. See Git clone or Git fork? for more information.

Then, check out the release/7.2.0 branch and create a working branch. For example:

$ git checkout release/7.2.0
$ git checkout -b my-working-branch

ForgeRock recommends that you regularly incorporate updates to the release/7.2.0 into your working branch:

  1. Review the Release Notes from time to time—they provide information about updates.

  2. Pull new commits in the release/7.2.0 branch into your clone’s release/7.2.0 branch.

  3. Rebase the commits from the new branch into your working branch in your forgeops repository clone.

It’s important to understand the impact of rebasing changes from the forgeops repository into your branches. Repository reference provides advice about which files in the forgeops repository to change, which files not to change, and what to look out for when you rebase. Follow the advice in Repository reference to reduce merge conflicts, and to better understand how to resolve them when you rebase your working branch with updates that ForgeRock has made to the release/7.2.0 branch.

Repository reference

For more information about support for the forgeops repository, see Support from ForgeRock.

Directories

bin

Example scripts you can use or model for a variety of deployment tasks.

Recommendation: Don’t modify the files in this directory. If you want to add your own scripts to the forgeops repository, create a subdirectory under bin, and store your scripts there.

Support Status: Sample files. Not supported by ForgeRock.

cicd

Example files for working with Google Cloud Build CI/CD.

Recommendation: Don’t modify the files in this directory. If you want to add your own CI/CD support files to the forgeops repository, create a subdirectory under cicd, and store your files there.

Support Status: Sample files. Not supported by ForgeRock.

cluster

Example scripts and artifacts that automate cluster creation.

Recommendation: Don’t modify the files in this directory. If you want to add your own cluster creation support files to the forgeops repository, create a subdirectory under cluster, and store your files there.

Support Status: Sample files. Not supported by ForgeRock.

config

Deprecated. Supported an older implementation of the CDK.

docker

Contains three types of files needed to build Docker images for the ForgeRock Identity Platform: Dockerfiles, support files that go into Docker images, and configuration profiles.

Dockerfiles

Common deployment customizations require modifications to Dockerfiles in the docker directory.

Recommendation: Expect to encounter merge conflicts when you rebase changes from ForgeRock into your branches. Be sure to track changes you’ve made to Dockerfiles, so that you’re prepared to resolve merge conflicts after a rebase.

Support Status: Dockerfiles. Support is available from ForgeRock.

Support Files Referenced by Dockerfiles

When customizing ForgeRock’s default deployments, you might need to add files to the docker directory. For example, to customize the AM WAR file, you might need to add plugin JAR files, user interface customization files, or image files.

Recommendation: If you only add new files to the docker directory, you should not encounter merge conflicts when you rebase changes from ForgeRock into your branches. However, if you need to modify any files from ForgeRock, you might encounter merge conflicts. Be sure to track changes you’ve made to any files in the docker directory, so that you’re prepared to resolve merge conflicts after a rebase.

Support Status:

Scripts and other files from ForgeRock that are incorporated into Docker images for the ForgeRock Identity Platform: Support is available from ForgeRock.

User customizations that are incorporated into custom Docker images for the ForgeRock Identity Platform: Support is not available from ForgeRock.

Configuration Profiles

Add your own configuration profiles to the docker directory using the export command. Do not modify the canonical CDK profile or ForgeRock’s internal-use only am-only, idm-only, ds-only, and ig-only configuration profiles.

Recommendation: You should not encounter merge conflicts when you rebase changes from ForgeRock into your branches.

Support Status: Configuration profiles. Support is available from ForgeRock.

etc

Files used to support several examples, including the CDM.

Recommendation: Don’t modify the files in this directory (or its subdirectories). If you want to use CDM automated cluster creation as a model or starting point for your own automated cluster creation, then create your own subdirectories under etc, and copy the files you want to model into the subdirectories.

Support Status: Sample files. Not supported by ForgeRock.

jenkins-scripts

For ForgeRock internal use only. Do not modify or use.

kustomize

Artifacts for orchestrating the ForgeRock Identity Platform using Kustomize.

Recommendation: Common deployment customizations, such as changing the deployment namespace and providing a customized FQDN, require modifications to files in the kustomize/overlay directory. You’ll probably change, at minimum, the kustomize/overlay/all/kustomization.yaml file.

Expect to encounter merge conflicts when you rebase changes into your branches. Be sure to track changes you’ve made to files in the kustomize directory, so that you’re prepared to resolve merge conflicts after a rebase.

Support Status: Kustomize bases and overlays. Support is available from ForgeRock.

legacy-docs

Documentation for deploying the ForgeRock Identity Platform using DevOps techniques. Includes documentation for supported and deprecated versions of the forgeops repository.

Recommendation: Don’t modify the files in this directory.

Support Status:

Documentation for supported versions of the forgeops repository: Support is available from ForgeRock.

Documentation for deprecated versions of the forgeops repository: Not supported by ForgeRock.

Files in the top-level directory

.gcloudignore, .gitchangelog.rc, .gitignore

For ForgeRock internal use only. Do not modify.

LICENSE

Software license for artifacts in the forgeops repository. Do not modify.

Makefile

For ForgeRock internal use only. Do not modify.

notifications.json

For ForgeRock internal use only. Do not modify.

README.md

The top-level forgeops repository README file. Do not modify.

skaffold.yaml

Contains configuration used by the forgeops build command to build Docker images for the ForgeRock Identity Platform. Note that the forgeops build command calls Skaffold to build Docker images. Do not modify.

Git clone or Git fork?

For the simplest use cases—a single user in an organization installing the CDK or CDM for a proof of concept, or exploration of the platform—cloning ForgeRock’s public forgeops repository from GitHub provides a quick and adequate way to access the repository.

If, however, your use case is more complex, you might want to fork the forgeops repository, and use the fork as your common upstream repository. For example:

  • Multiple users in your organization need to access a common version of the repository and share changes made by other users.

  • Your organization plans to incorporate forgeops repository changes from ForgeRock.

  • Your organization wants to use pull requests when making repository updates.

If you’ve forked the forgeops repository:

  • You’ll need to synchronize your fork with ForgeRock’s public repository on GitHub when ForgeRock releases a new release tag.

  • Your users will need to clone your fork before they start working instead of cloning the public forgeops repository on GitHub. Because procedures in the CDK documentation and the CDM documentation tell users to clone the public repository, you’ll need to make sure your users follow different procedures to clone the forks instead.

  • The steps for initially obtaining and updating your repository clone will differ from the steps provided in the documentation. You’ll need to let users know how to work with the fork as the upstream instead of following the steps in the documentation.

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