ForgeOps

Secret Agent operator

The open source Secret Agent operator generates all the secrets needed for CDK and CDM deployments except for the DS master key and TLS key. When the DS operator creates directory instances, it calls certificate manager to generate these two keys.

In addition to generating secrets, the operator also integrates with Google Cloud Secret Manager, AWS Secrets Manager, and Azure Key Vault to manage secrets, providing cloud backup and retrieval for secrets.

The Secret Agent operator runs as a Kubernetes deployment that must be available before you can install AM, IDM, and DS.

Secret generation

By default, the operator examines your namespace to determine whether it contains all the secrets that it manages for ForgeRock Identity Platform deployments. If any of the secrets it manages are not present, the operator generates them.

See the Secret Agent project README for information about:

Cloud secret management

Configuring the Secret Agent operator to integrate with a cloud secret manager, such as Google Cloud Secret Manager, AWS Secret Manager, or Azure Key Vault, changes the operator’s behavior:

  • First, the operator examines your namespace to determine whether it contains all the secrets it manages for ForgeRock Identity Platform deployments.

  • If any of the secrets it manages are not in your namespace, the operator checks to see if the missing secrets are available in the cloud secret manager:

    • If any of the secrets missing from your namespace are available in the cloud secret manager, the operator gets them from the cloud secret manager and adds them to your namespace.

    • If missing secrets are not available in the cloud secret manager, the Secret Agent operator generates them.

Configure cloud secret management when you have multiple ForgeRock Identity Platform deployments that need to use the same secrets.

See the Secret Agent project README for information about how to configure the Secret Agent operator for cloud secret management using these cloud secret managers:

Administration password changes

The CDM uses these administration passwords:

  • The AM and IDM administration user, amadmin

  • The AM application store service account, uid=am-config,ou=admins,ou=am-config

  • The AM CTS service account, uid=openam_cts,ou=admins,ou=famrecords,ou=openam-session,ou=tokens

  • The shared identity repository service account, uid=am-identity-bind-account,ou=admins,ou=identities

  • The DS root user, uid=admin

Some organizations have a requirement to change administration passwords from time to time. Follow these steps if you need to change the CDM administration passwords:

  1. Change the amadmin user’s password:

    1. Change to the bin directory in your forgeops repository clone.

    2. Run the forgeops info command. Note the current password for the amadmin user.

    3. If you have enabled cloud secret management, delete the entry that contains the amadmin user’s password from the cloud secret manager:

      Google Cloud

      List the secrets managed by the cloud secret manager, locate the URI for the secret that contains the AM-PASSWORDS-AMADMIN-CLEAR password, and delete it. For example:

      $ gcloud secrets list --uri
      $ gcloud secrets delete \
       https://secretmanager.googleapis.com/. . ./prod-am-env-secrets-AM-PASSWORDS-AMADMIN-CLEAR
      AWS

      List the secrets managed by the cloud secret manager, locate the ARN for the secret that contains the AM-PASSWORDS-AMADMIN-CLEAR password, and delete it. For example:

      $ aws secretsmanager list-secrets --region=my-region
      $ aws secretsmanager delete-secret --region=my-region \
       --force-delete-without-recovery \
       --secret-id arn:aws:secretsmanager:. . .:prod-am-env-secrets-AM-PASSWORDS-AMADMIN-CLEAR-c3KfsL
      Azure

      Soft delete the secret that contains the AM-PASSWORDS-AMADMIN-CLEAR password from Azure Key Vault. For example:

      $ az keyvault secret delete --vault-name my-key-vault --name prod-am-env-secrets-AM-PASSWORDS-AMADMIN-CLEAR

      Purge the soft deleted secret from Azure Key Vault. For example:

      $ az keyvault secret purge --vault-name my-key-vault --name prod-am-env-secrets-AM-PASSWORDS-AMADMIN-CLEAR
    4. Delete the Kubernetes secret that contains the amadmin user’s password from the prod namespace:

      $ kubens prod
      $ kubectl patch secrets am-env-secrets --type=json \
       --patch='[{"op":"remove", "path": "/data/AM_PASSWORDS_AMADMIN_CLEAR"}]'
    5. Restart AM by deleting all active AM pods: list all the pods in the prod namespace, and then delete all the pods running AM.

    6. After AM comes up, run the forgeops info command again to get the current administration passwords.

      Verify that the amadmin user’s password has changed by comparing its previous value to its current value.

    7. Verify that you can log in to the platform UI using the new password.

  2. Change the AM application store service account’s password:

    1. Change to the bin directory in your forgeops repository clone.

    2. Run the forgeops info command. Note the current password for the AM application store service account.

    3. If you have enabled cloud secret management, delete the entry that contains this account’s password from the cloud secret manager:

      Google Cloud

      List the secrets managed by the cloud secret manager, locate the URI for the secret that contains the AM_STORES_APPLICATION_PASSWORD password, and delete it. For example:

      $ gcloud secrets list --uri
      $ gcloud secrets delete \
       https://secretmanager.googleapis.com/. . ./prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_APPLICATION_PASSWORD
      AWS

      List the secrets managed by the cloud secret manager, locate the ARN for the secret that contains the AM_STORES_APPLICATION_PASSWORD password, and delete it. For example:

      $ aws secretsmanager list-secrets --region=my-region
      $ aws secretsmanager delete-secret --region=my-region \
       --force-delete-without-recovery \
       --secret-id arn:aws:secretsmanager:. . .:prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_APPLICATION_PASSWORD-1d4432
      Azure

      Soft delete the secret that contains the AM_STORES_APPLICATION_PASSWORD password from Azure Key Vault. For example:

      $ az keyvault secret delete --vault-name my-key-vault --name prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_APPLICATION_PASSWORD

      Purge the deleted secret from Azure Key Vault. For example:

      $ az keyvault secret purge --vault-name my-key-vault --name prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_APPLICATION_PASSWORD
    4. Delete the Kubernetes secret that contains the service account’s password from the prod namespace:

      $ kubens prod
      $ kubectl patch secrets ds-env-secrets --type=json \
       --patch='[{"op":"remove", "path": "/data/AM_STORES_APPLICATION_PASSWORD"}]'
    5. Redeploy the platform:

      $ cd /path/to/forgeops/bin
      $ forgeops delete
      $ forgeops install --small --fqdn cdm.example.com
    6. After the platform comes up, run the forgeops info command again to get the current administration passwords.

      Verify that the AM application store service account’s password has changed by comparing its previous value to its current value.

  3. Change the CTS service account’s password:

    1. Change to the bin directory in your forgeops repository clone.

    2. Run the forgeops info command. Note the current password for the identity repository service account.

    3. If you have enabled cloud secret management, delete the entry that contains this account’s password from the cloud secret manager:

      Google Cloud

      List the secrets managed by the cloud secret manager, locate the URI for the secret that contains the AM_STORES_CTS_PASSWORD password, and delete it. For example:

      $ gcloud secrets list --uri
      $ gcloud secrets delete \
       https://secretmanager.googleapis.com/. . ./prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_CTS_PASSWORD
      AWS

      List the secrets managed by the cloud secret manager, locate the ARN for the secret that contains the AM_STORES_CTS_PASSWORD password, and delete it. For example:

      $ aws secretsmanager list-secrets --region=my-region
      $ aws secretsmanager delete-secret --region=my-region \
       --force-delete-without-recovery \
       --secret-id arn:aws:secretsmanager:. . .:prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_CTS_PASSWORD-1d4432
      Azure

      Soft delete the secret that contains the AM_STORES_CTS_PASSWORD password from Azure Key Vault. For example:

      $ az keyvault secret delete --vault-name my-key-vault --name prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_CTS_PASSWORD

      Purge the deleted secret from Azure Key Vault. For example:

      $ az keyvault secret purge --vault-name my-key-vault --name prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_CTS_PASSWORD
    4. Delete the Kubernetes secret that contains the service account’s password from the prod namespace:

      $ kubens prod
      $ kubectl patch secrets ds-env-secrets --type=json \
       --patch='[{"op":"remove", "path": "/data/AM_STORES_CTS_PASSWORD"}]'
    5. Redeploy the platform:

      $ cd /path/to/forgeops/bin
      $ forgeops delete
      $ forgeops install --small --fqdn cdm.example.com
    6. After the platform comes up, run the forgeops info command again to get the current administration passwords.

      Verify that the CTS service account’s password has changed by comparing its previous value to its current value.

  4. Change the identity repository service account’s password:

    1. Change to the bin directory in your forgeops repository clone.

    2. Run the forgeops info command. Note the current password for the the identity repository service account.

    3. If you have enabled cloud secret management, delete the entry that contains this account’s password from the cloud secret manager:

      Google Cloud

      List the secrets managed by the cloud secret manager, locate the URI for the secret that contains the AM_STORES_USER_PASSWORD password, and delete it. For example:

      $ gcloud secrets list --uri
      $ gcloud secrets delete \
       https://secretmanager.googleapis.com/. . ./prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_USER_PASSWORD
      AWS

      List the secrets managed by the cloud secret manager, locate the ARN for the secret that contains the AM_STORES_USER_PASSWORD password, and delete it. For example:

      $ aws secretsmanager list-secrets --region=my-region
      $ aws secretsmanager delete-secret --region=my-region \
       --force-delete-without-recovery \
       --secret-id arn:aws:secretsmanager:. . .:prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_USER_PASSWORD-1d4432
      Azure

      Soft delete the secret that contains the AM_STORES_USER_PASSWORD password from Azure Key Vault. For example:

      $ az keyvault secret delete --vault-name my-key-vault --name prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_USER_PASSWORD

      Purge the deleted secret from Azure Key Vault. For example:

      $ az keyvault secret purge --vault-name my-key-vault --name prod-ds-env-secrets-AM_STORES_USER_PASSWORD
    4. Delete the Kubernetes secret that contains the service account’s password from the prod namespace:

      $ kubens prod
      $ kubectl patch secrets ds-env-secrets --type=json \
       --patch='[{"op":"remove", "path": "/data/AM_STORES_USER_PASSWORD"}]'
    5. Redeploy the platform:

      $ cd /path/to/forgeops/bin
      $ forgeops delete
      $ forgeops install --small --fqdn cdm.example.com
    6. After the platform comes up, run the forgeops info command again to get the current administration passwords.

      Verify that the identity repository service account’s password has changed by comparing its previous value to its current value.

  5. Change the DS root user’s password:

    1. Change to the bin directory in your forgeops repository clone.

    2. Run the forgeops info command. Note the current password for the uid=admin account.

    3. If you have enabled cloud secret management, delete the entry that contains this account’s password from the cloud secret manager:

      Google Cloud

      List the secrets managed by the cloud secret manager, locate the URI for the secret that contains the dirmanager-pw password, and delete it. For example:

      $ gcloud secrets list --uri
      $ gcloud secrets delete \
       https://secretmanager.googleapis.com/. . ./prod-ds-passwords-dirmanager-pw
      AWS

      List the secrets managed by the cloud secret manager, locate the ARN for the secret that contains the dirmanager-pw password, and delete it. For example:

      $ aws secretsmanager list-secrets --region=my-region
      $ aws secretsmanager delete-secret --region=my-region \
       --force-delete-without-recovery \
       --secret-id arn:aws:secretsmanager:. . .:prod-ds-passwords-dirmanager-pw-2eeaa0
      Azure

      Soft delete the secret that contains the dirmanager-pw password from Azure Key Vault. For example:

      $ az keyvault secret delete --vault-name my-key-vault --name prod-ds-passwords-dirmanager-pw

      Purge the deleted secret from Azure Key Vault. For example:

      $ az keyvault secret purge --vault-name my-key-vault --name prod-ds-passwords-dirmanager-pw
    4. Delete the Kubernetes secret that contains the service account’s password from the prod namespace:

      $ kubens prod
      $ kubectl patch secrets ds-passwords --type=json \
       --patch='[{"op":"remove", "path": "/data/dirmanager.pw"}]'
    5. Redeploy the platform:

      $ cd /path/to/forgeops/bin
      $ forgeops delete
      $ forgeops install --small --fqdn cdm.example.com
    6. After the platform comes up, run the forgeops info command again to get the current administration passwords.

      Verify that the password for the uid=admin account has changed by comparing its previous value to its current value.

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