HTTP Access

Set the HTTP Port

The following steps demonstrate how to set up an HTTP port if none was configured at setup time with the --httpPort option:

  1. Create an HTTP connection handler:

    $ dsconfig \
     create-connection-handler \
     --hostname localhost \
     --port 4444 \
     --bindDN uid=admin \
     --bindPassword password \
     --handler-name HTTP \
     --type http \
     --set enabled:true \
     --set listen-port:8080 \
     --no-prompt \
     --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
     --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin
  2. Enable an HTTP access log.

    1. The following command enables JSON-based HTTP access logging:

      $ dsconfig \
       set-log-publisher-prop \
       --hostname localhost \
       --port 4444 \
       --bindDN uid=admin \
       --bindPassword password \
       --publisher-name "Json File-Based HTTP Access Logger" \
       --set enabled:true \
       --no-prompt \
       --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
       --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin
    2. The following command enables HTTP access logging:

      $ dsconfig \
       set-log-publisher-prop \
       --hostname localhost \
       --port 4444 \
       --bindDN uid=admin \
       --bindPassword password \
       --publisher-name "File-Based HTTP Access Logger" \
       --set enabled:true \
       --no-prompt \
       --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
       --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin
  3. After you set up an HTTP port, enable an HTTP endpoint.

Set the HTTPS Port

At setup time use the --httpsPort option.

Later, follow these steps to set up an HTTPS port:

  1. Create an HTTPS connection handler.

    The following example sets the port to 8443 and uses the default server certificate:

    $ dsconfig \
     create-connection-handler \
     --hostname localhost \
     --port 4444 \
     --bindDN uid=admin \
     --bindPassword password \
     --handler-name HTTPS \
     --type http \
     --set enabled:true \
     --set listen-port:8443 \
     --set use-ssl:true \
     --set key-manager-provider:PKCS12 \
     --set trust-manager-provider:"JVM Trust Manager" \
     --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
     --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin \
     --no-prompt
  2. Enable the HTTP access log.

    1. The following command enables JSON-based HTTP access logging:

      $ dsconfig \
       set-log-publisher-prop \
       --hostname localhost \
       --port 4444 \
       --bindDN uid=admin \
       --bindPassword password \
       --publisher-name "Json File-Based HTTP Access Logger" \
       --set enabled:true \
       --no-prompt \
       --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
       --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin
    2. The following command enables HTTP access logging:

      $ dsconfig \
       set-log-publisher-prop \
       --hostname localhost \
       --port 4444 \
       --bindDN uid=admin \
       --bindPassword password \
       --publisher-name "File-Based HTTP Access Logger" \
       --set enabled:true \
       --no-prompt \
       --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
       --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin
  3. If the deployment requires SSL client authentication, set the properties ssl-client-auth-policy and trust-manager-provider appropriately.

  4. After you set up an HTTPS port, enable an HTTP endpoint.

Configure HTTP User APIs

The way directory data appears to client applications is configurable. You configure a Rest2ldap endpoint for each HTTP API to user data.

A Rest2ldap mapping file defines how JSON resources map to LDAP entries. The default mapping file is /path/to/opendj/config/rest2ldap/endpoints/api/example-v1.json. The default mapping works with Example.com data from the evaluation setup profile.

Edit or add mapping files for your own APIs. For details, see REST to LDAP Reference.

If you have set up a directory server with the ds-evaluation profile, you can skip the first two steps:

  1. If necessary, change the properties of the default Rest2ldap endpoint, or create a new endpoint.

    The default Rest2ldap HTTP endpoint is named /api after its base-path. The base-path must be the same as the name, and is read-only after creation. By default, the /api endpoint requires authentication.

    The following example enables the default /api endpoint:

    $ dsconfig \
     set-http-endpoint-prop \
     --hostname localhost \
     --port 4444 \
     --bindDN uid=admin \
     --bindPassword password \
     --endpoint-name /api \
     --set authorization-mechanism:"HTTP Basic" \
     --set config-directory:config/rest2ldap/endpoints/api \
     --set enabled:true \
     --no-prompt \
     --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
     --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin

    Alternatively, you can create another Rest2ldap endpoint to expose a different HTTP API, or to publish data under an alternative base path, such as /rest:

    $ dsconfig \
     create-http-endpoint \
     --hostname localhost \
     --port 4444 \
     --bindDN uid=admin \
     --bindPassword password \
     --endpoint-name /rest \
     --type rest2ldap-endpoint \
     --set authorization-mechanism:"HTTP Basic" \
     --set config-directory:config/rest2ldap/endpoints/api \
     --set enabled:true \
     --no-prompt \
     --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
     --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin
  2. If necessary, adjust the endpoint configuration to use an alternative HTTP authorization mechanism.

    By default, the Rest2ldap endpoint maps HTTP Basic authentication to LDAP authentication. Change the authorization-mechanism setting as necessary. For details, see Configure HTTP Authorization.

  3. Try reading a resource.

    The following example generates the CA certificate in PEM format from the server deployment key and password. It uses the CA certificate to trust the server certificate. A CA certificate is only necessary if the CA is not well-known:

    $ dskeymgr \
     export-ca-cert \
     --deploymentKey $DEPLOYMENT_KEY \
     --deploymentKeyPassword password \
     --outputFile ca-cert.pem
    
    $ curl \
     --cacert ca-cert.pem \
     --user bjensen:hifalutin \
     https://localhost:8443/api/users/bjensen?_prettyPrint=true
    
    {
      "_id" : "bjensen",
      "_rev" : "<revision>",
      "_schema" : "frapi:opendj:rest2ldap:posixUser:1.0",
      "_meta" : { },
      "userName" : "bjensen@example.com",
      "displayName" : [ "Barbara Jensen", "Babs Jensen" ],
      "name" : {
        "givenName" : "Barbara",
        "familyName" : "Jensen"
      },
      "description" : "Original description",
      "contactInformation" : {
        "telephoneNumber" : "+1 408 555 1862",
        "emailAddress" : "bjensen@example.com"
      },
      "uidNumber" : 1076,
      "gidNumber" : 1000,
      "homeDirectory" : "/home/bjensen",
      "manager" : {
        "_id" : "trigden",
        "displayName" : "Torrey Rigden"
      }
    }

Configure HTTP Authorization

HTTP authorization mechanisms map HTTP credentials to LDAP credentials.

Multiple HTTP authorization mechanisms can be enabled simultaneously. You can assign different mechanisms to Rest2ldap endpoints and to the Admin endpoint.

By default, these HTTP authorization mechanisms are supported:

HTTP Anonymous

Process anonymous HTTP requests, optionally binding with a specified DN.

If no bind DN is specified (default), anonymous LDAP requests are used.

This mechanism is enabled by default.

HTTP Basic (enabled by default)

Process HTTP Basic authentication requests by mapping the HTTP Basic identity to a user’s directory account.

By default, the exact match identity mapper with its default configuration is used to map the HTTP Basic user name to an LDAP uid. The DS server then searches in all local public naming contexts to find the user’s entry based in the uid value. For details, see Identity Mappers.

HTTP OAuth2 CTS

Process OAuth 2.0 requests as a resource server, acting as an AM Core Token Service (CTS) store.

When the client bearing an OAuth 2.0 access token presents the token to access the JSON resource, the server tries to resolve the access token against the CTS data that it serves for AM. If the access token resolves correctly (is found in the CTS data and has not expired), the DS server extracts the user identity and OAuth 2.0 scopes. If the required scopes are present and the token is valid, it maps the user identity to a directory account.

This mechanism makes it possible to resolve access tokens by making an internal request, avoiding a request to AM. This mechanism does not ensure that the token requested will have already been replicated to the replica where the request is routed.

AM’s CTS store is constrained to a specific layout. The authzid-json-pointer must use userName/0 for the user identifier.

HTTP OAuth2 OpenAM

Process OAuth 2.0 requests as a resource server, sending requests to AM for access token resolution.

When the client bearing an OAuth 2.0 access token presents the token to access the JSON resource, the directory service requests token information from AM. If the access token is valid, the DS server extracts the user identity and OAuth 2.0 scopes. If the required scopes are present, it maps the user identity to a directory account.

Access token resolution requests should be sent over HTTPS. You can configure a truststore manager if necessary to trust the authorization server certificate, and a keystore manager to obtain the DS server certificate if the authorization server requires mutual authentication.

HTTP OAuth2 Token Introspection (RFC7662)

Handle OAuth 2.0 requests as a resource server, sending requests to an RFC 7662-compliant authorization server for access token resolution.

The DS server must be registered as a client of the authorization server.

When the client bearing an OAuth 2.0 access token presents the token to access the JSON resource, the DS server requests token introspection from the authorization server. If the access token is valid, the DS server extracts the user identity and OAuth 2.0 scopes. If the required scopes are present, it maps the user identity to a directory account.

Access token resolution requests should be sent over HTTPS. You can configure a truststore manager if necessary to trust the authorization server certificate, and a keystore manager to obtain the DS server certificate if the authorization server requires mutual authentication.

The HTTP OAuth2 File mechanism is an internal interface intended for testing, and not supported for production use.

When more than one authentication mechanism is specified, mechanisms are applied in the following order:

  • If the client request has an Authorization header, and an OAuth 2.0 mechanism is specified, the server attempts to apply the OAuth 2.0 mechanism.

  • If the client request has an Authorization header, or has the custom credentials headers specified in the configuration, and an HTTP Basic mechanism is specified, the server attempts to apply the Basic Auth mechanism.

  • Otherwise, if an HTTP anonymous mechanism is specified, and none of the previous mechanisms apply, the server attempts to apply the mechanism for anonymous HTTP requests.

There are many possibilities when configuring HTTP authorization mechanisms. This procedure shows only one OAuth 2.0 example.

The example below uses settings as listed in the following table. When using secure connections, make sure the servers can trust each other’s certificates. Download ForgeRock Access Management software from the ForgeRock BackStage download site:

Setting Value

OpenAM URL

https://am.example.com:8443/openam
(When using HTTPS, make sure DS can trust the AM certificate.)

Authorization server endpoint

/oauth2/tokeninfo (top-level realm)

Identity repository

DS server configured by the examples that follow.

OAuth 2.0 client ID

myClientID

OAuth 2.0 client secret

password

OAuth 2.0 client scopes

read, uid, write

Rest2ldap configuration

Default settings. See Configure HTTP User APIs.

Read the ForgeRock Access Management documentation if necessary to install and configure AM. Then follow these steps to try the demonstration:

  1. Update the default HTTP OAuth2 OpenAM configuration:

    $ dsconfig \
     set-http-authorization-mechanism-prop \
     --hostname localhost \
     --port 4444 \
     --bindDN uid=admin \
     --bindPassword password \
     --mechanism-name "HTTP OAuth2 OpenAM" \
     --set enabled:true \
     --set token-info-url:https://am.example.com:8443/openam/oauth2/tokeninfo \
     --no-prompt \
     --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
     --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin
  2. Update the default Rest2ldap endpoint configuration to use HTTP OAuth2 OpenAM as the authorization mechanism:

    $ dsconfig \
     set-http-endpoint-prop \
     --hostname localhost \
     --port 4444 \
     --bindDN uid=admin \
     --bindPassword password \
     --endpoint-name "/api" \
     --set authorization-mechanism:"HTTP OAuth2 OpenAM" \
     --no-prompt \
     --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
     --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin
  3. Obtain an access token with the appropriate scopes:

    $ curl \
     --request POST \
     --user "myClientID:password" \
     --data "grant_type=password&username=bjensen&password=hifalutin&scope=read%20uid%20write" \
     https://am.example.com:8443/openam/oauth2/access_token
    {
     "access_token": "token-string",
     "scope": "uid read write",
     "token_type": "Bearer",
     "expires_in": 3599
    }

    Use HTTPS when obtaining access tokens.

  4. Request a resource at the Rest2ldap endpoint using HTTP Bearer authentication with the access token:

    $ curl \
     --header "Authorization: Bearer token-string" \
     --cacert ca-cert.pem \
     https://localhost:8443/api/users/bjensen?_prettyPrint=true
    {
      "_id": "bjensen",
      "_rev": "<revision>",
      "_schema": "frapi:opendj:rest2ldap:posixUser:1.0",
      "_meta": {},
      "userName": "bjensen@example.com",
      "displayName": ["Barbara Jensen", "Babs Jensen"],
      "name": {
        "givenName": "Barbara",
        "familyName": "Jensen"
      },
      "description": "Original description",
      "contactInformation": {
        "telephoneNumber": "+1 408 555 1862",
        "emailAddress": "bjensen@example.com"
      },
      "uidNumber": 1076,
      "gidNumber": 1000,
      "homeDirectory": "/home/bjensen",
      "manager": {
        "_id": "trigden",
        "displayName": "Torrey Rigden"
      }
    }

    Use HTTPS when presenting access tokens.

Use Administrative APIs

The APIs for configuring and monitoring DS servers are under the following endpoints:

/admin/config

Provides a REST API to the server configuration under cn=config.

By default, this endpoint is protected by the HTTP Basic authorization mechanism. Users reading and editing the configuration must have appropriate privileges, such as config-read and config-write.

Each LDAP entry maps to a resource under /admin/config, with default values shown in the resource even if they are not set in the LDAP representation.

/alive

Provides an endpoint to check whether the server is currently alive, meaning that its internal checks have not found any errors that would require administrative action.

By default, this endpoint returns a status code to anonymous requests, and supports authenticated requests. For details, see Server is Alive (HTTP).

/healthy

Provides an endpoint to check whether the server is currently healthy, meaning that it is alive and any replication delays are below a configurable threshold.

By default, this endpoint returns a status code to anonymous requests, and supports authenticated requests. For details, see Server Health (HTTP).

/metrics/api

Provides a read-only REST API to the server monitoring information under cn=monitor.

By default, this endpoint is protected by the HTTP Basic authorization mechanism. Users reading monitoring information must have the monitor-read privilege.

Each LDAP entry maps to a resource under /metrics/api.

/metrics/prometheus

Provides an API to the server monitoring information for use with Prometheus monitoring software.

By default, this endpoint is protected by the HTTP Basic authorization mechanism. Users reading monitoring information must the monitor-read privilege.

To use the Admin endpoint APIs, follow these steps:

  1. Grant users access to the endpoints as appropriate:

    1. For access to /admin/config, assign config-read or config-write privileges.

      The following example assigns the config-read privilege to Kirsten Vaughan:

      $ ldapmodify \
       --hostname localhost \
       --port 1636 \
       --useSsl \
       --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
       --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin \
       --bindDN uid=admin \
       --bindPassword password << EOF
      dn: uid=kvaughan,ou=People,dc=example,dc=com
      changetype: modify
      add: ds-privilege-name
      ds-privilege-name: config-read
      EOF
    2. For access to /metrics endpoints, if no account for monitoring was created at setup time, assign the monitor-read privilege.

      The following example adds the monitor-read privilege to Kirsten Vaughan’s entry:

      $ ldapmodify \
       --hostname localhost \
       --port 1636 \
       --useSsl \
       --usePkcs12TrustStore /path/to/opendj/config/keystore \
       --trustStorePassword:file /path/to/opendj/config/keystore.pin \
       --bindDN uid=admin \
       --bindPassword password << EOF
      dn: uid=kvaughan,ou=People,dc=example,dc=com
      changetype: modify
      add: ds-privilege-name
      ds-privilege-name: monitor-read
      EOF

    For details, see Administrative Privileges.

  2. Adjust the authorization-mechanism settings for the Admin endpoint.

    By default, the Admin endpoint uses the HTTP Basic authorization mechanism. The HTTP Basic authorization mechanism default configuration resolves the user identity extracted from the HTTP request to an LDAP user identity as follows:

    1. If the request has an Authorization: Basic header for HTTP Basic authentication, the server extracts the username and password.

    2. If the request has X-OpenIDM-Username and X-OpenIDM-Password headers, the server extracts the username and password.

    3. The server uses the default exact match identity mapper to search for a unique match between the username and the UID attribute value of an entry in the local public naming contexts of the DS server.

      In other words, in LDAP terms, it searches under all user data base DNs for (uid=http-username). The username kvaughan maps to the example entry with DN uid=kvaughan,ou=People,dc=example,dc=com.

  3. Test access to the endpoint as an authorized user.

    The following example reads the Admin endpoint resource under /admin/config. The following example generates the CA certificate in PEM format from the server deployment key and password. It uses the CA certificate to trust the server certificate. A CA certificate is only necessary if the CA is not well-known:

    $ dskeymgr \
     export-ca-cert \
     --deploymentKey $DEPLOYMENT_KEY \
     --deploymentKeyPassword password \
     --outputFile ca-cert.pem
    
    $ curl \
     --cacert ca-cert.pem \
     --user kvaughan:bribery \
     https://localhost:8443/admin/config/http-endpoints/%2Fadmin?_prettyPrint=true
    
    {
      "_id" : "/admin",
      "_rev" : "<revision>",
      "_schema" : "admin-endpoint",
      "java-class" : "org.opends.server.protocols.http.rest2ldap.AdminEndpoint",
      "base-path" : "/admin",
      "enabled" : true,
      "authorization-mechanism" : "HTTP Basic"
    }

    Notice how the path to the resource in the example above, /admin/config/http-endpoints/%2Fadmin, corresponds to the DN of the entry under cn=config, which is ds-cfg-base-path=/admin,cn=HTTP Endpoints,cn=config.

    The following example demonstrates reading everything under /metrics/api:

    $ curl \
     --cacert ca-cert.pem \
     --user kvaughan:bribery \
     https://localhost:8443/metrics/api?_queryFilter=true